VS.

Drill vs. Dig

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Drillverb

(transitive) To create (a hole) by removing material with a drill tool.

‘Drill a small hole to start tmhe screw in the right direction.’;

Digverb

To move hard-packed earth out of the way, especially downward to make a hole with a shovel. Or to drill, or the like, through rocks, roads, or the like. More generally, to make any similar hole by moving material out of the way.should this be split into senses?

‘They dug an eight-foot ditch along the side of the road.’; ‘In the wintertime, heavy truck tires dig into the road, forming potholes.’; ‘If the plane can't pull out of the dive it is in, it'll dig a hole in the ground.’; ‘My seven-year-old son always digs a hole in the middle of his mashed potatoes and fills it with gravy before he starts to eat them.’;

Drillverb

(intransitive) To practice, especially in (or as in) a military context.

‘They drilled daily to learn the routine exactly.’;

Digverb

(transitive) To get by digging; to take from the ground; often with up.

‘to dig potatoes’; ‘to dig up gold’;

Drillverb

(ergative) To cause to drill practice; to train in military arts.

‘The sergeant was up by 6:00 every morning, drilling his troops.’;

Digverb

(mining) To take ore from its bed, in distinction from making excavations in search of ore.

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Drillverb

(transitive) To repeat an idea frequently in order to encourage someone to remember it.

‘The instructor drilled into us the importance of reading the instructions.’;

Digverb

To work like a digger; to study ploddingly and laboriously.

Drillverb

(intransitive) To investigate or examine something in more detail or at a different level

‘Drill deeper and you may find the underlying assumptions faulty.’;

Digverb

(figurative) To investigate, to research, often followed by out or up.

‘to dig up evidence’; ‘to dig out the facts’;

Drillverb

(transitive) To hit or kick with a lot of power.

Digverb

To thrust; to poke.

‘He dug an elbow into my ribs and guffawed at his own joke.’;

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Drillverb

(baseball) To hit someone with a pitch, especially in an intentional context.

Digverb

(volleyball) To defend against an attack hit by the opposing team by successfully passing the ball

Drillverb

To have sexual intercourse with; to penetrate.

Digverb

(slang) To understand or show interest in. should this be split into two senses?

‘You dig?’;

Drillverb

(transitive) To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling.

‘waters drilled through a sandy stratum’;

Digverb

(slang) To appreciate, or like.

‘Baby, I dig you.’;

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Drillverb

(transitive) To sow (seeds) by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row.

Dignoun

An archeological or paleontological investigation, or the site where such an investigation is taking place.

Drillverb

To entice or allure; to decoy; with on.

Dignoun

A plodding and laborious student.

Drillverb

To cause to slip or waste away by degrees.

Dignoun

A thrust; a poke.

‘He guffawed and gave me a dig in the ribs after telling his latest joke.’;

Drillnoun

A tool used to remove material so as to create a hole, typically by plunging a rotating cutting bit into a stationary workpiece.

‘Wear safety glasses when operating an electric drill.’;

Dignoun

A tool for digging.

Drillnoun

The portion of a drilling tool that drives the bit.

‘Use a drill with a wire brush to remove any rust or buildup.’;

Dignoun

(volleyball) A defensive pass of the ball that has been attacked by the opposing team.

Drillnoun

An agricultural implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made.

Dignoun

A cutting, sarcastic remark.

Drillnoun

A light furrow or channel made to put seed into, when sowing.

Dignoun

A rare or interesting vinyl record bought second-hand.

‘a £1 charity shop dig’;

Drillnoun

A row of seed sown in a furrow.

Dignoun

Digoxin.

‘dig toxicity’;

Drillnoun

An activity done as an exercise or practice (especially a military exercise), particularly in preparation for some possible future event or occurrence.

‘Regular fire drills can ensure that everyone knows how to exit safely in an emergency.’;

Digverb

To turn up, or delve in, (earth) with a spade or a hoe; to open, loosen, or break up (the soil) with a spade, or other sharp instrument; to pierce, open, or loosen, as if with a spade.

‘Be first to dig the ground.’;

Drillnoun

(obsolete) A small trickling stream; a rill.

Digverb

To get by digging; as, to dig potatoes, or gold.

Drillnoun

Any of several molluscs, of the genus Urosalpinx, especially the oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea), that drill holes in the shells of other animals.

Digverb

To hollow out, as a well; to form, as a ditch, by removing earth; to excavate; as, to dig a ditch or a well.

Drillnoun

A style of trap music with gritty, violent lyrics, originating on the South Side of Chicago.

Digverb

To thrust; to poke.

‘You should have seen children . . . dig and push their mothers under the sides, saying thus to them: Look, mother, how great a lubber doth yet wear pearls.’;

Drillnoun

An Old World monkey of West Africa, Mandrillus leucophaeus, similar in appearance to the mandrill, but lacking the colorful face.

Digverb

To like; enjoy; admire.

Drillnoun

A strong, durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave.

Digverb

To work with a spade or other like implement; to do servile work; to delve.

‘Dig for it more than for hid treasures.’; ‘I can not dig; to beg I am ashamed.’;

Drillverb

To pierce or bore with a drill, or a with a drill; to perforate; as, to drill a hole into a rock; to drill a piece of metal.

Digverb

To take ore from its bed, in distinction from making excavations in search of ore.

Drillverb

To train in the military art; to exercise diligently, as soldiers, in military evolutions and exercises; hence, to instruct thoroughly in the rudiments of any art or branch of knowledge; to discipline.

‘He [Frederic the Great] drilled his people, as he drilled his grenadiers.’;

Digverb

To work hard or drudge;

‘Peter dug at his books all the harder.’;

Drillverb

To practice an exercise or exercises; to train one's self.

Digverb

Of a tool: To cut deeply into the work because ill set, held at a wrong angle, or the like, as when a lathe tool is set too low and so sprung into the work.

Drillverb

To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling; as, waters drilled through a sandy stratum.

Digverb

To understand; as, do you dig me?.

Drillverb

To sow, as seeds, by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row, like a trickling rill of water.

Digverb

To notice; to look at; as, dig that crazy hat!.

Drillverb

To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; - with on.

‘See drilled him on to five-fifty.’;

Digverb

To appreciate and enjoy; as, he digs classical music as well as rock.

Drillverb

To cause to slip or waste away by degrees.

‘This accident hath drilled away the whole summer.’;

Dignoun

A thrust; a punch; a poke; as, a dig in the side or the ribs. See Dig, v. t., 4.

Drillverb

To trickle.

Dignoun

A plodding and laborious student.

Drillverb

To sow in drills.

Dignoun

A tool for digging.

Drillnoun

An instrument with an edged or pointed end used for making holes in hard substances; strictly, a tool that cuts with its end, by revolving, as in drilling metals, or by a succession of blows, as in drilling stone; also, a drill press.

Dignoun

An act of digging.

Drillnoun

The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill.

Dignoun

An amount to be dug.

Drillnoun

Any exercise, physical or mental, enforced with regularity and by constant repetition; as, a severe drill in Latin grammar.

Dignoun

same as Gouge.

Drillnoun

A marine gastropod, of several species, which kills oysters and other bivalves by drilling holes through the shell. The most destructive kind is Urosalpinx cinerea.

Dignoun

a critical and sometimes sarcastic or insulting remark, but often good-humored; as, celebrities at a roast must suffer through countless digs.

Drillnoun

A small trickling stream; a rill.

‘Springs through the pleasant meadows pour their drills.’;

Dignoun

An archeological excavation site.

Drillnoun

An implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made.

Dignoun

the site of an archeological exploration;

‘they set up camp next to the dig’;

Drillnoun

A large African baboon (Cynocephalus leucophæus).

Dignoun

an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect;

‘his parting shot was `drop dead'’; ‘she threw shafts of sarcasm’; ‘she takes a dig at me every chance she gets’;

Drillnoun

Same as Drilling.

Dignoun

a small gouge (as in the cover of a book);

‘the book was in good condition except for a dig in the back cover’;

Drillnoun

a tool with a sharp point and cutting edges for making holes in hard materials (usually rotating rapidly or by repeated blows)

Dignoun

the act of digging;

‘there's an interesting excavation going on near Princeton’;

Drillnoun

similar to the mandrill but smaller and less brightly colored

Dignoun

the act of touching someone suddenly with your finger or elbow;

‘she gave me a sharp dig in the ribs’;

Drillnoun

systematic training by multiple repetitions;

‘practice makes perfect’;

Digverb

turn up, loosen, or remove earth;

‘Dig we must’; ‘turn over the soil for aeration’;

Drillnoun

(military) the training of soldiers to march (as in ceremonial parades) or to perform the manual of arms

Digverb

create by digging;

‘dig a hole’; ‘dig out a channel’;

Drillverb

make a hole with a pointed power or hand tool;

‘don't drill here, there's a gas pipe’; ‘drill a hole into the wall’; ‘drill for oil’;

Digverb

work hard;

‘She was digging away at her math homework’; ‘Lexicographers drudge all day long’;

Drillverb

train in the military, e.g., in the use of weapons

Digverb

remove the inner part or the core of;

‘the mining company wants to excavate the hillsite’;

Drillverb

learn by repetition;

‘We drilled French verbs every day’; ‘Pianists practice scales’;

Digverb

poke or thrust abruptly;

‘he jabbed his finger into her ribs’;

Drillverb

teach by repetition

Digverb

get the meaning of something;

‘Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?’;

Drillverb

undergo military training or do military exercises

Drillnoun

a tool or machine with a rotating cutting tip or reciprocating hammer or chisel, used for making holes.

Drillnoun

a tool with a rotating tip used by a dentist for cutting away part of a tooth before filling it.

Drillnoun

instruction or training in military exercises

‘parade-ground drill’;

Drillnoun

intensive instruction or training in something, typically by means of repeated exercises

‘tables can be mastered by drill and practice’; ‘language-learning drills’;

Drillnoun

a rehearsal of the procedure to be followed in an emergency

‘air-raid drills’;

Drillnoun

the correct or recognized procedure or way of doing something

‘he didn't know the drill’;

Drillnoun

a predatory mollusc that bores into the shells of other molluscs in order to feed on the soft tissue.

Drillnoun

a machine which makes small furrows, sows seed in them, and then covers the seed with earth.

Drillnoun

a small furrow made by a drill

‘sprinkle the seeds along a four foot drill’;

Drillnoun

a row of plants sown in a drill

‘drills of lettuces’;

Drillnoun

a dark brown baboon with a short tail and a naked blue or purple rump, found in the rainforests of West Africa.

Drillnoun

a coarse twilled cotton or linen fabric

‘top quality cotton drill with reinforced seams’; ‘sturdy clothes in drill, denim and linen’;

Drillverb

produce (a hole) in something by or as if by boring with a drill

‘drill holes through the tiles for the masonry pins’;

Drillverb

make a hole in (something) by boring with a drill

‘a power tool for drilling wood’;

Drillverb

make a hole in or through something by using a drill

‘his eyes drilled into her’; ‘do not attempt to drill through a joist’;

Drillverb

sink a borehole in order to obtain oil or water

‘BP has been licensed to drill for oil in the area’;

Drillverb

(of a dentist) cut away part of (a tooth) before filling it

‘I didn't like having my teeth drilled, but extractions were worse’;

Drillverb

(of a sports player) hit (a shot) hard and in a straight line

‘he drilled a right-foot volley into the back of the net’;

Drillverb

subject (someone) to military training exercises

‘a sergeant was drilling new recruits’;

Drillverb

(of a person) take part in military training exercises

‘the troops were drilling’;

Drillverb

instruct (someone) in something by the means of repeated exercises or practice

‘I reacted instinctively because I had been drilled to do just that’;

Drillverb

cause (someone) to learn something by repeating it regularly

‘his mother had drilled into him the need to pay for one's sins’;

Drillverb

sow (seed) with a drill

‘crops drilled in autumn’;

Drillverb

plant (the ground) in furrows

‘he drilled 100 acres in eight hours’;

Drill

A drill or drilling machine is a tool primarily used for making round holes or driving fasteners. It is fitted with a bit, either a drill or driver, depending on application, secured by a chuck.

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