VS.

Drift vs. Skid

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Driftnoun

(physical) Movement; that which moves or is moved.

Skidverb

(intransitive) To slide in an uncontrolled manner as in a car with the brakes applied too hard.

‘They skidded around the corner and accelerated up the street.’;

Driftnoun

(obsolete) A driving; a violent movement.

Skidverb

(transitive) To protect or support with a skid or skids.

Driftnoun

Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

Skidverb

(transitive) To cause to move on skids.

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Driftnoun

That which is driven, forced, or urged along.

Skidverb

(transitive) To check or halt (wagon wheels, etc.) with a skid.

Driftnoun

Anything driven at random.

Skidnoun

A shoe or clog, as of iron, attached to a chain, and placed under the wheel of a wagon to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill; a drag; a skidpan; also, by extension, a hook attached to a chain, and used for the same purpose.

Driftnoun

A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., especially by wind or water.

‘a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, etc.’;

Skidnoun

A piece of timber used as a support, or to receive pressure.

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Driftnoun

The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

Skidnoun

A runner (one or two) under some flying machines, used for landing.

Driftnoun

A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

Skidnoun

A low movable platform for supporting heavy items to be transported, typically of two layers, and having a space between the layers into which the fork of a fork lift can be inserted; it is used to conveniently transport heavy objects by means of a fork lift; - a skid without wheels is the same as a pallet.

Driftnoun

A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the retreat of continental glaciers, such as that which buries former river valleys and creates young river valleys.

Skidnoun

Declining fortunes; a movement toward defeat or downfall; - used mostly in the phrase on the skids and hit the skids.

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Driftnoun

Driftwood included in flotsam washed up onto the beach.

Skidnoun

Act of skidding; - called also side slip.

Driftnoun

The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

Skidverb

To protect or support with a skid or skids; also, to cause to move on skids.

Driftnoun

A place (a ford) along a river where the water is shallow enough to permit crossing to the opposite side.

Skidverb

To check with a skid, as wagon wheels.

Driftnoun

The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

Skidverb

To haul (logs) to a skid and load on a skidway.

Driftnoun

(architecture) The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

Skidverb

To slide without rotating; - said of a wheel held from turning while the vehicle moves onward.

Driftnoun

(handiwork) A tool.

Skidverb

To fail to grip the roadway; specif., to slip sideways on the road; to side-slip; - said esp. of a cycle or automobile.

Driftnoun

A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

Skidnoun

one of a pair of planks used to make a track for rolling or sliding objects

Driftnoun

A tool used to pack down the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

Skidnoun

a restraint provided when the brake linings are moved hydraulically against the brake drum to retard the wheel's rotation

Driftnoun

A tool used to insert or extract a removable pin made of metal or hardwood, for the purpose of aligning and/or securing two pieces of material together.

Skidnoun

an unexpected slide

Driftnoun

A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.

Skidverb

slide without control;

‘the car skidded in the curve on the wet road’;

Driftnoun

(mining) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

Skidverb

elevate onto skids

Driftnoun

(nautical) Movement.

Skidverb

apply a brake or skid to

Driftnoun

The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.

Skidverb

move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner;

‘the wheels skidded against the sidewalk’;

Driftnoun

The distance a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.

Driftnoun

The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.

Driftnoun

The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.

Driftnoun

The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

Driftnoun

(cricket) A sideways movement of the ball through the air, when bowled by a spin bowler.

Driftnoun

Slow, cumulative change.

‘genetic drift’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To move slowly, especially pushed by currents of water, air, etc.

‘The boat drifted away from the shore.’; ‘The balloon was drifting in the breeze.’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To move haphazardly without any destination.

‘He drifted from town to town, never settling down.’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To deviate gently from the intended direction of travel.

‘This car tends to drift left at high speeds.’;

Driftverb

(transitive) To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

Driftverb

(transitive) To drive into heaps.

‘A current of wind drifts snow or sand’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps.

‘Snow or sand drifts.’;

Driftverb

To make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

Driftverb

To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

Driftverb

To oversteer a vehicle, causing loss of traction, while maintaining control from entry to exit of a corner. See Drifting (motorsport).

Driftnoun

A driving; a violent movement.

‘The dragon drew him [self] away with drift of his wings.’;

Driftnoun

The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

‘A bad man, being under the drift of any passion, will follow the impulse of it till something interpose.’;

Driftnoun

Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

Driftnoun

The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

‘He has made the drift of the whole poem a compliment on his country in general.’; ‘Now thou knowest my drift.’;

Driftnoun

That which is driven, forced, or urged along

‘Drifts of rising dust involve the sky.’; ‘We got the brig a good bed in the rushing drift [of ice].’;

Driftnoun

A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

‘Cattle coming over the bridge (with their great drift doing much damage to the high ways).’;

Driftnoun

The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

Driftnoun

A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the agency of ice.

Driftnoun

In South Africa, a ford in a river.

Driftnoun

A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

Driftnoun

A tool used in driving down compactly the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

Driftnoun

A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

Driftnoun

The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

Driftnoun

The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

Driftnoun

One of the slower movements of oceanic circulation; a general tendency of the water, subject to occasional or frequent diversion or reversal by the wind; as, the easterly drift of the North Pacific.

Driftnoun

The horizontal component of the pressure of the air on the sustaining surfaces of a flying machine. The lift is the corresponding vertical component, which sustains the machine in the air.

Driftverb

To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east.

‘We drifted o'er the harbor bar.’;

Driftverb

To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps; as, snow or sand drifts.

Driftverb

to make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

Driftverb

To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

Driftverb

To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand.

Driftverb

To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

Driftadjective

That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud.

Driftnoun

a force that moves something along

Driftnoun

the gradual departure from an intended course due to external influences (as a ship or plane)

Driftnoun

a process of linguistic change over a period of time

Driftnoun

something that is heaped up by the wind or by water currents

Driftnoun

a general tendency to change (as of opinion);

‘not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book’; ‘a broad movement of the electorate to the right’;

Driftnoun

general meaning or tenor;

‘caught the drift of the conversation’;

Driftnoun

a horizontal (or nearly horizontal) passageway in a mine;

‘they dug a drift parallel with the vein’;

Driftverb

be in motion due to some air or water current;

‘The leaves were blowing in the wind’; ‘the boat drifted on the lake’; ‘The sailboat was adrift on the open sea’; ‘the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore’;

Driftverb

wander from a direct course or at random;

‘The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her’; ‘don't drift from the set course’;

Driftverb

move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment;

‘The gypsies roamed the woods’; ‘roving vagabonds’; ‘the wandering Jew’; ‘The cattle roam across the prairie’; ‘the laborers drift from one town to the next’; ‘They rolled from town to town’;

Driftverb

vary or move from a fixed point or course;

‘stock prices are drifting higher’;

Driftverb

live unhurriedly, irresponsibly, or freely;

‘My son drifted around for years in California before going to law school’;

Driftverb

move in an unhurried fashion;

‘The unknown young man drifted among the invited guests’;

Driftverb

cause to be carried by a current;

‘drift the boats downstream’;

Driftverb

drive slowly and far afield for grazing;

‘drift the cattle herds westwards’;

Driftverb

be subject to fluctuation;

‘The stock market drifted upward’;

Driftverb

be piled up in banks or heaps by the force of wind or a current;

‘snow drifting several feet high’; ‘sand drifting like snow’;

Driftverb

be carried slowly by a current of air or water

‘the cabin cruiser started to drift downstream’; ‘excited voices drifted down the hall’;

Driftverb

walk slowly, aimlessly, or casually

‘people began to drift away’;

Driftverb

move passively, aimlessly, or involuntarily into a certain situation or condition

‘I was drifting off to sleep’;

Driftverb

(of a person or their attention) digress or stray to another subject

‘I noticed my audience's attention drifting’;

Driftverb

(especially of snow or leaves) be blown into heaps by the wind

‘fallen leaves start to drift in the gutters’;

Driftnoun

a continuous slow movement from one place to another

‘there was a drift to the towns’;

Driftnoun

the deviation of a vessel, aircraft, or projectile from its intended or expected course as the result of currents or winds

‘the pilot had not noticed any appreciable drift’;

Driftnoun

a steady movement or development from one thing towards another that is perceived as unwelcome

‘the drift towards a more repressive style of policing’;

Driftnoun

a state of inaction or indecision

‘after so much drift, any expression of enthusiasm is welcome’;

Driftnoun

a controlled skid, used in taking bends at high speeds.

Driftnoun

the general intention or meaning of an argument or someone's remarks

‘maybe I'm too close to the forest to see the trees, if you catch my drift’; ‘he didn't understand much Greek, but he got her drift’;

Driftnoun

a large mass of snow, leaves, or other material piled up or carried along by the wind

‘four sheep were dug out of the drift’;

Driftnoun

glacial and fluvioglacial deposits left by retreating ice sheets.

Driftnoun

a large spread of flowering plants growing together

‘a drift of daffodils’;

Driftnoun

a horizontal or inclined passage following a mineral vein or coal seam

‘the drift led to another smaller ore chamber’;

Driftnoun

an act of driving cattle or sheep.

Driftnoun

an act of herding cattle within a forest to a particular place on an appointed day in order to determine ownership or to levy fines.

Driftnoun

a ford.

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