VS.

Dispatch vs. Post

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Dispatchverb

To send a shipment with promptness.

Postnoun

A long dowel or plank protruding from the ground; a fencepost; a lightpost.

Dispatchverb

To send an important official message sent by a diplomat or military officer with promptness.

Postnoun

(construction) A stud; a two-by-four.

Dispatchverb

To send a journalist to a place in order to report.

Postnoun

A pole in a battery.

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Dispatchverb

To hurry.

Postnoun

(dentistry) A long, narrow piece inserted into a root canal to provide retention for a crown.

Dispatchverb

To dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform.

Postnoun

A prolonged final melody note, among moving harmony notes.

Dispatchverb

To rid; to free.

Postnoun

A printing paper size measuring 19.25 inches x 15.5 inches.

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Dispatchverb

(obsolete) To deprive.

Postnoun

(sports) A goalpost.

Dispatchverb

To destroy quickly and efficiently.

Postnoun

(obsolete) The doorpost of a victualler's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt.

Dispatchverb

(computing) To pass on for further processing, especially via a dispatch table (often with to).

Postnoun

(obsolete) Each of a series of men stationed at specific places along a postroad, with responsibility for relaying letters and dispatches of the monarch (and later others) along the route.

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Dispatchnoun

A message sent quickly, as a shipment, a prompt settlement of a business, or an important official message sent by a diplomat, or military officer.

Postnoun

(dated) A station, or one of a series of stations, established for the refreshment and accommodation of travellers on some recognized route.

‘a stage or railway post’;

Dispatchnoun

The act of doing something quickly.

‘We must act with dispatch in this matter.’;

Postnoun

A military base; the place at which a soldier or a body of troops is stationed; also, the troops at such a station.

Dispatchnoun

A mission by an emergency response service, typically attend to an emergency in the field.

Postnoun

Someone who travels express along a set route carrying letters and dispatches; a courier.

Dispatchnoun

(computing) The passing on of a message for further processing, especially via a dispatch table.

Postnoun

An organisation for delivering letters, parcels etc., or the service provided by such an organisation.

‘sent via post; parcel post’;

Dispatchnoun

(obsolete) A dismissal.

Postnoun

A single delivery of letters; the letters or deliveries that make up a single batch delivered to one person or one address.

Dispatchverb

To dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform.

‘Ere we put ourselves in arms, dispatch weThe business we have talked of.’; ‘[The] harvest men . . . almost in one fair day dispatcheth all the harvest work.’;

Postnoun

A message posted in an electronic or Internet forum.

Dispatchverb

To rid; to free.

‘I had clean dispatched myself of this great charge.’;

Postnoun

A location on a basketball court near the basket.

Dispatchverb

To get rid of by sending off; to send away hastily.

‘Unless dispatched to the mansion house in the country . . . they perish among the lumber of garrets.’;

Postnoun

(American football) A moderate to deep passing route in which a receiver runs 10-20 yards from the line of scrimmage straight down the field, then cuts toward the middle of the field (towards the facing goalposts) at a 45-degree angle.

‘Two of the receivers ran post patterns.’;

Dispatchverb

To send off or away; - particularly applied to sending off messengers, messages, letters, etc., on special business, and implying haste.

‘Even with the speediest expeditionI will dispatch him to the emperor's cou .’;

Postnoun

(obsolete) Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier.

Dispatchverb

To send out of the world; to put to death.

‘The company shall stone them with stones, and dispatch them with their swords.’;

Postnoun

(obsolete) One who has charge of a station, especially a postal station.

Dispatchverb

To make haste; to conclude an affair; to finish a matter of business.

‘They have dispatched with Pompey.’;

Postnoun

An assigned station; a guard post.

Dispatchnoun

The act of sending a message or messenger in haste or on important business.

Postnoun

An appointed position in an organization, job.

Dispatchnoun

Any sending away; dismissal; riddance.

‘To the utter dispatch of all their most beloved comforts.’;

Postnoun

Post-production.

Dispatchnoun

The finishing up of a business; speedy performance, as of business; prompt execution; diligence; haste.

‘Serious business, craving quick dispatch.’; ‘To carry his scythe . . . with a sufficient dispatch through a sufficient space.’;

Postverb

(transitive) To hang (a notice) in a conspicuous manner for general review.

‘Post no bills.’;

Dispatchnoun

A message dispatched or sent with speed; especially, an important official letter sent from one public officer to another; - often used in the plural; as, a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American minister; naval or military dispatches.

Postverb

To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation.

‘to post someone for cowardice’;

Dispatchnoun

A message transmitted by telegraph.

Postverb

(accounting) To carry (an account) from the journal to the ledger.

Dispatchnoun

an official report (usually sent in haste)

Postverb

To inform; to give the news to; to make acquainted with the details of a subject; often with up.

Dispatchnoun

the act of sending off something

Postverb

To pay (a blind).

‘Since Jim was new to the game, he had to post $4 in order to receive a hand.’;

Dispatchnoun

the property of being prompt and efficient;

‘it was done with dispatch’;

Postverb

To put content online, usually through a publicly accessible mean, such as a video channel, gallery, message board, blog etc.

Dispatchnoun

killing a person or animal

Postverb

To travel with relays of horses; to travel by post horses, originally as a courier.

Dispatchverb

send away towards a designated goal

Postverb

To travel quickly; to hurry.

Dispatchverb

complete or carry out;

‘discharge one's duties’;

Postverb

(UK) To send (an item of mail etc.) through the postal service.

‘Mail items posted before 7.00pm within the Central Business District and before 5.00pm outside the Central Business District will be delivered the next working day.’;

Dispatchverb

kill intentionally and with premeditation;

‘The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered’;

Postverb

(horse-riding) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, especially in trotting.

Dispatchverb

dispose of rapidly and without delay and efficiently;

‘He dispatched the task he was assigned’;

Postverb

(Internet) To publish (a message) to a newsgroup, forum, blog, etc.

‘I couldn't figure it out, so I posted a question on the mailing list.’;

Dispatchverb

kill without delay;

‘the traitor was dispatched by the conspirators’;

Postverb

To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, etc.

Dispatchverb

send off to a destination or for a purpose

‘the government dispatched 150 police to restore order’; ‘he dispatched messages back to base’;

Postverb

To assign to a station; to set; to place.

‘Post a sentinel in front of the door.’;

Dispatchverb

deal with (a task or opponent) quickly and efficiently

‘the Welsh team were dispatched comfortably by the opposition’;

Postadverb

With the post, on post-horses; express, with speed, quickly

Dispatchverb

kill

‘he dispatched the animal with one blow’;

Postadverb

Sent via the postal service.

Dispatchnoun

the sending of someone or something to a destination or for a purpose

‘a resolution authorizing the dispatch of a peacekeeping force’;

Postpreposition

After; especially after a significant event that has long-term ramifications.

Dispatchnoun

promptness and efficiency

‘the situation might change, so he should proceed with dispatch’;

Postadjective

Hired to do what is wrong; suborned.

Dispatchnoun

an official report on state or military affairs

‘in his battle dispatch he described the gunner's bravery’;

Postnoun

A piece of timber, metal, or other solid substance, fixed, or to be fixed, firmly in an upright position, especially when intended as a stay or support to something else; a pillar; as, a hitching post; a fence post; the posts of a house.

‘They shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side posts and on the upper doorpost of the houses.’; ‘Then by main force pulled up, and on his shoulders bore,The gates of Azza, post and massy bar.’; ‘Unto his order he was a noble post.’;

Dispatchnoun

a report sent in from abroad by a journalist

‘he conducted meetings for the correspondents and censored their dispatches’;

Postnoun

The doorpost of a victualer's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt.

‘When God sends coinI will discharge your post.’;

Dispatchnoun

the killing of someone or something

‘the executioner's merciful dispatch of his victims’;

Postnoun

The place at which anything is stopped, placed, or fixed; a station.

Postnoun

A messenger who goes from station; an express; especially, one who is employed by the government to carry letters and parcels regularly from one place to another; a letter carrier; a postman.

‘In certain places there be always fresh posts, to carry that further which is brought unto them by the other.’; ‘I fear my Julia would not deign my lines,Receiving them from such a worthless post.’;

Postnoun

An established conveyance for letters from one place or station to another; especially, the governmental system in any country for carrying and distributing letters and parcels; the post office; the mail; hence, the carriage by which the mail is transported.

‘I send you the fair copy of the poem on dullness, which I should not care to hazard by the common post.’;

Postnoun

Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier.

Postnoun

One who has charge of a station, especially of a postal station.

‘He held office of postmaster, or, as it was then called, post, for several years.’;

Postnoun

A station, office, or position of service, trust, or emolument; as, the post of duty; the post of danger.

‘The post of honor is a private station.’;

Postnoun

A size of printing and writing paper. See the Table under Paper.

Postverb

To attach to a post, a wall, or other usual place of affixing public notices; to placard; as, to post a notice; to post playbills.

Postverb

To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation; as, to post one for cowardice.

‘On pain of being posted to your sorrowFail not, at four, to meet me.’;

Postverb

To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, or the like.

Postverb

To assign to a station; to set; to place; as, to post a sentinel.

Postverb

To carry, as an account, from the journal to the ledger; as, to post an account; to transfer, as accounts, to the ledger.

‘You have not posted your books these ten years.’;

Postverb

To place in the care of the post; to mail; as, to post a letter.

Postverb

To inform; to give the news to; to make (one) acquainted with the details of a subject; - often with up.

‘Thoroughly posted up in the politics and literature of the day.’;

Postverb

To travel with post horses; figuratively, to travel in haste.

‘And post o'er land and ocean without rest.’;

Postverb

To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, esp. in trotting.

Postadverb

With post horses; hence, in haste; as, to travel post.

Postnoun

the position where someone (as a guard or sentry) stands or is assigned to stand;

‘a soldier manned the entrance post’; ‘a sentry station’;

Postnoun

military installation at which a body of troops is stationed;

‘this military post provides an important source of income for the town nearby’; ‘there is an officer's club on the post’;

Postnoun

a job in an organization;

‘he occupied a post in the treasury’;

Postnoun

an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position;

‘he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them’;

Postnoun

United States aviator who in 1933 made the first solo flight around the world (1899-1935)

Postnoun

United States female author who wrote a book and a syndicated newspaper column on etiquette (1872-1960)

Postnoun

United States manufacturer of breakfast cereals and Postum (1854-1914)

Postnoun

any particular collection of letters or packages that is delivered;

‘your mail is on the table’; ‘is there any post for me?’; ‘she was opening her post’;

Postnoun

a pole or stake set up to mark something (as the start or end of a race track);

‘a pair of posts marked the goal’; ‘the corner of the lot was indicated by a stake’;

Postnoun

the system whereby messages are transmitted via the post office;

‘the mail handles billions of items every day’; ‘he works for the United States mail service’; ‘in England they call mail `the post'’;

Postnoun

the delivery and collection of letters and packages;

‘it came by the first post’; ‘if you hurry you'll catch the post’;

Postverb

affix in a public place or for public notice;

‘post a warning’;

Postverb

publicize with, or as if with, a poster;

‘I'll post the news on the bulletin board’;

Postverb

assign to a post; put into a post;

‘The newspaper posted him in Timbuktu’;

Postverb

assign to a station

Postverb

display, as of records in sports games

Postverb

enter on a public list

Postverb

transfer (entries) from one account book to another

Postverb

ride Western style and bob up and down in the saddle in in rhythm with a horse's trotting gait

Postverb

mark with a stake;

‘stake out the path’;

Postverb

put up;

‘post a sign’; ‘post a warning at the dump’;

Postverb

cause to be directed or transmitted to another place;

‘send me your latest results’; ‘I'll mail you the paper when it's written’;

Postverb

mark or expose as infamous;

‘She was branded a loose woman’;

Postnoun

a long, sturdy piece of timber or metal set upright in the ground and used as a support or marker

‘follow the blue posts until the track meets a road’;

Postnoun

a goalpost

‘Robertson, at the near post, headed wide’;

Postnoun

a starting post or winning post.

Postnoun

a piece of writing, image, or other item of content published online, typically on a blog or social media website or application

‘in a recent post, he cautioned investors to be wary of these predictions’;

Postnoun

the official service or system that delivers letters and parcels

‘the tickets are in the post’; ‘winners will be notified by post’;

Postnoun

letters and parcels delivered

‘she was opening her post’;

Postnoun

a single collection or delivery of mail

‘entries must be received no later than first post on 14 June’;

Postnoun

used in names of newspapers

‘the Washington Post’;

Postnoun

each of a series of couriers who carried mail on horseback between fixed stages.

Postnoun

a person or vehicle that carries mail.

Postnoun

a position of paid employment; a job

‘he resigned from the post of Foreign Minister’; ‘a teaching post’;

Postnoun

a place where someone is on duty or where a particular activity is carried out

‘a customs post’; ‘a shift worker asleep at his post’;

Postnoun

a place where a soldier or police officer is stationed or which they patrol

‘he gave the men orders not to leave their posts’;

Postnoun

a force stationed at a permanent position or camp; a garrison.

Postnoun

a local group in an organization of military veterans.

Postnoun

the status or rank of full-grade captain in the Royal Navy

‘Captain Miller was made post in 1796’;

Postverb

display (a notice) in a public place

‘a curt notice had been posted on the door’;

Postverb

put notices on or in

‘we have posted all the bars’;

Postverb

announce or publish (something, especially a financial result)

‘the company posted a £460,000 loss’;

Postverb

publish the name of (a member of the armed forces) as missing or dead

‘a whole troop had been posted missing’;

Postverb

publish (a piece of writing, image, or other item of content) online, typically on a blog or social media website or application

‘the list was promptly posted all over the Internet’; ‘I'll post an article next week revealing the results of the poll’; ‘she posted a photo of herself with the singer on Twitter’; ‘the company posted the news on its blog yesterday’;

Postverb

(of a player or team) achieve or record (a particular score or result)

‘Smith and Lamb posted a century partnership’;

Postverb

send (a letter or parcel) via the postal system

‘post off your order form today’; ‘I've just been to post a letter’;

Postverb

(in bookkeeping) enter (an item) in a ledger

‘post the transaction in the second column’; ‘initial records kept in day books are periodically posted to accounts’;

Postverb

complete (a ledger) by entering items.

Postverb

travel with relays of horses

‘we posted in an open carriage’;

Postverb

travel with haste; hurry

‘he comes posting up the street’;

Postverb

send (someone) to a place to take up an appointment

‘he was posted to Washington as military attaché’;

Postverb

station (someone, especially a soldier or police officer) in a particular place

‘a guard was posted at the entrance’;

Postadverb

with haste

‘come now, come post’;

Postpreposition

subsequent to; after

‘American poetry post the 1950s hasn't had the same impact’;

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