VS.

Discount vs. Deduct

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Discountverb

To deduct from an account, debt, charge, and the like.

‘Merchants sometimes discount five or six per cent for prompt payment of bills.’;

Deductverb

To take one thing from another; remove from; make smaller by some amount.

‘I will deduct the cost of the can of peas from the money I owe you.’;

Discountverb

To lend money upon, deducting the discount or allowance for interest

‘the banks discount notes and bills of exchange’;

Deductverb

To lead forth or out.

‘A people deducted out of the city of Philippos.’;

Discountverb

To take into consideration beforehand; to anticipate and form conclusions concerning (an event).

Deductverb

To take away, separate, or remove, in numbering, estimating, or calculating; to subtract; - often with from or out of.

‘Deduct what is but vanity, or dress.’; ‘Two and a half per cent should be deducted out of the pay of the foreign troops.’; ‘We deduct from the computation of our years that part of our time which is spent in . . . infancy.’;

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Discountverb

To leave out of account or regard as unimportant.

‘They discounted his comments.’;

Deductverb

To reduce; to diminish.

Discountverb

To lend, or make a practice of lending, money, abating the discount

Deductverb

make a subtraction

Discountnoun

A reduction in price.

‘This store offers discounts on all its wares. That store specializes in discount wares, too.’;

Deductverb

retain and refrain from disbursing; of payments;

‘My employer is withholding taxes’;

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Discountnoun

A deduction made for interest, in advancing money upon, or purchasing, a bill or note not due; payment in advance of interest upon money.

Deductverb

reason by deduction; establish by deduction

Discountnoun

The rate of interest charged in discounting.

Deductverb

subtract or take away (an amount or part) from a total

‘tax has been deducted from the payments’;

Discountadjective

Specializing in selling goods at reduced prices.

‘If you're looking for cheap clothes, there's a discount clothier around the corner.’;

Discountverb

To deduct from an account, debt, charge, and the like; to make an abatement of; as, merchants sometimes discount five or six per cent for prompt payment of bills.

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Discountverb

To lend money upon, deducting the discount or allowance for interest; as, the banks discount notes and bills of exchange.

‘Discount only unexceptionable paper.’;

Discountverb

To take into consideration beforehand; to anticipate and form conclusions concerning (an event).

Discountverb

To leave out of account; to take no notice of.

‘Of the three opinions (I discount Brown's).’;

Discountverb

To lend, or make a practice of lending, money, abating the discount; as, the discount for sixty or ninety days.

Discountnoun

A counting off or deduction made from a gross sum on any account whatever; an allowance upon an account, debt, demand, price asked, and the like; something taken or deducted.

Discountnoun

A deduction made for interest, in advancing money upon, or purchasing, a bill or note not due; payment in advance of interest upon money.

Discountnoun

The rate of interest charged in discounting.

Discountnoun

the act of reducing the selling price of merchandise

Discountnoun

interest on an annual basis deducted in advance on a loan

Discountnoun

a refund of some fraction of the amount paid

Discountnoun

an amount or percentage deducted

Discountverb

bar from attention or consideration;

‘She dismissed his advances’;

Discountverb

give a reduction in price on;

‘I never discount these books-they sell like hot cakes’;

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