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Discipline vs. Philosophy — What's the Difference?

Discipline vs. Philosophy — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Discipline and Philosophy

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Discipline

Discipline is action or inaction that is regulated to be in accordance (or to achieve accord) with a particular system of governance. Discipline is commonly applied to regulating human and animal behavior to its society or environment it belongs.

Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek: φιλοσοφία, philosophia, 'love of wisdom') is the study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about existence, reason, knowledge, values, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved.

Discipline

Training expected to produce a specific character or pattern of behavior, especially training that produces moral or mental improvement
Was raised in the strictest discipline.

Philosophy

The study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when considered as an academic discipline.

Discipline

Control obtained by enforcing compliance or order
Military discipline.
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Philosophy

A theory or attitude that acts as a guiding principle for behaviour
Don't expect anything and you won't be disappointed, that's my philosophy

Discipline

Controlled behavior resulting from disciplinary training; self-control
Dieting takes a lot of discipline.

Philosophy

The study of the nature, causes, or principles of reality, knowledge, or values, based on logical reasoning.

Discipline

A state of order based on submission to rules and authority
A teacher who demanded discipline in the classroom.

Philosophy

A system of thought based on or involving such study
The philosophy of Hume.

Discipline

Punishment intended to correct or train
Subjected to harsh discipline.

Philosophy

The study of the theoretical underpinnings of a particular field or discipline
The philosophy of history.

Discipline

A set of rules or methods, as those regulating the practice of a church or monastic order.

Philosophy

An underlying theory or set of ideas relating to a particular field of activity or to life as a whole
An original philosophy of advertising.
An unusual philosophy of life.

Discipline

A branch of knowledge or teaching
The discipline of mathematics.

Philosophy

The love of wisdom.

Discipline

To train by instruction and practice, as in following rules or developing self-control
The sergeant disciplined the recruits to become soldiers.

Philosophy

(uncountable) An academic discipline that seeks truth through reasoning rather than empiricism.
Philosophy is often divided into five major branches: logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics.

Discipline

To punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience.

Philosophy

(countable) A comprehensive system of belief.

Discipline

To impose order on
Needed to discipline their study habits.

Philosophy

(countable) A view or outlook regarding fundamental principles underlying some domain.
A philosophy of government;
A philosophy of education

Discipline

A controlled behaviour; self-control.

Philosophy

(countable) A general principle (usually moral).

Discipline

An enforced compliance or control.

Philosophy

(archaic) A broader branch of (non-applied) science.

Discipline

A systematic method of obtaining obedience.

Philosophy

A calm and thoughtful demeanor; calmness of temper.

Discipline

A state of order based on submission to authority.

Philosophy

Synonym of small pica.

Discipline

A set of rules regulating behaviour.

Philosophy

To philosophize.

Discipline

A punishment to train or maintain control.

Philosophy

Literally, the love of, inducing the search after, wisdom; in actual usage, the knowledge of phenomena as explained by, and resolved into, causes and reasons, powers and laws.

Discipline

A specific branch of knowledge or learning.

Philosophy

A particular philosophical system or theory; the hypothesis by which particular phenomena are explained.
[Books] of Aristotle and his philosophie.
We shall in vain interpret their words by the notions of our philosophy and the doctrines in our school.

Discipline

A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.

Philosophy

Practical wisdom; calmness of temper and judgment; equanimity; fortitude; stoicism; as, to meet misfortune with philosophy.
Then had he spent all his philosophy.

Discipline

(transitive) To train someone by instruction and practice.

Philosophy

Reasoning; argumentation.
Of good and evil much they argued then, . . . Vain wisdom all, and false philosophy.

Discipline

(transitive) To teach someone to obey authority.

Philosophy

The course of sciences read in the schools.

Discipline

(transitive) To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.

Philosophy

A treatise on philosophy.

Discipline

(transitive) To impose order on someone.

Philosophy

A belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school

Discipline

The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.
Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity.
Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.

Philosophy

The rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics

Discipline

Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.
Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part,Obey the rules and discipline of art.

Philosophy

Any personal belief about how to live or how to deal with a situation;
Self-indulgence was his only philosophy
My father's philosophy of child-rearing was to let mother do it

Discipline

Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.
The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.

Discipline

Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.
A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate us.

Discipline

Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
Giving her the discipline of the strap.

Discipline

The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.

Discipline

The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.

Discipline

Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.

Discipline

A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.

Discipline

To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

Discipline

To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.
Ill armed, and worse disciplined.
His mind . . . imperfectly disciplined by nature.

Discipline

To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.
Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly?

Discipline

To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.

Discipline

A branch of knowledge;
In what discipline is his doctorate?
Teachers should be well trained in their subject
Anthropology is the study of human beings

Discipline

A system of rules of conduct or method of practice;
He quickly learned the discipline of prison routine
For such a plan to work requires discipline

Discipline

The trait of being well behaved;
He insisted on discipline among the troops

Discipline

Training to improve strength or self-control

Discipline

The act of punishing;
The offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received

Discipline

Train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control;
Parents must discipline their children
Is this dog trained?

Discipline

Punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience;
The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently

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