VS.

Disadvantage vs. Limitation

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Disadvantagenoun

A weakness or undesirable characteristic; a con.

‘The disadvantage to owning a food processor is that you have to store it somewhere.’;

Limitationnoun

The act of limiting or the state of being limited.

Disadvantagenoun

A setback or handicap.

‘My height is a disadvantage for reaching high shelves.’;

Limitationnoun

A restriction; a boundary, real or metaphorical, caused by some thing or some circumstance.

‘Getting into his wheelchair after his amputation, it felt like a limitation you could roll in.’; ‘He understood the exam material, but his fear was a limitation he could not overcome.’;

Disadvantagenoun

Loss; detriment; hindrance.

Limitationnoun

An imperfection or shortcoming that limits something's use or value.

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Disadvantageverb

(transitive) To place at a disadvantage.

‘They fear it might disadvantage honest participants to allow automated entries.’;

Limitationnoun

(law) A time period after which some legal action may no longer be brought.

‘The lawyer obtained impunity by dragging his obviously guilty client's case beyond the ten-year limitation.’;

Disadvantagenoun

Deprivation of advantage; unfavorable or prejudicial quality, condition, circumstance, or the like; that which hinders success, or causes loss or injury.

‘I was brought here under the disadvantage of being unknown by sight to any of you.’; ‘Abandoned by their great patron, the faction henceforward acted at disadvantage.’;

Limitationnoun

The act of limiting; the state or condition of being limited; as, the limitation of his authority was approved by the council.

‘They had no right to mistake the limitation . . . of their own faculties, for an inherent limitation of the possible modes of existence in the universe.’;

Disadvantagenoun

Loss; detriment; hindrance; prejudice to interest, fame, credit, profit, or other good.

‘They would throw a construction on his conduct, to his disadvantage before the public.’;

Limitationnoun

That which limits; a restriction; a qualification; a restraining condition, defining circumstance, or qualifying conception; as, limitations of thought.

‘The cause of error is ignorance what restraints and limitations all principles have in regard of the matter whereunto they are applicable.’;

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Disadvantageverb

To injure the interest of; to be detrimental to.

Limitationnoun

A certain precinct within which friars were allowed to beg, or exercise their functions; also, the time during which they were permitted to exercise their functions in such a district.

Disadvantagenoun

the quality of having an inferior or less favorable position

Limitationnoun

A limited time within or during which something is to be done.

‘You have stood your limitation, and the tribunesEndue you with the people's voice.’;

Disadvantageverb

put at a disadvantage; hinder, harm;

‘This rule clearly disadvantages me’;

Limitationnoun

A certain period limited by statute after which the claimant shall not enforce his claims by suit.

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Disadvantage

In policy debate, a disadvantage (abbreviated as DA, and sometimes referred to as: Disad) is an argument that a team brings up against a policy action that is being considered. A disadvantage is also used in Lincoln Douglas Debate.

Limitationnoun

a principle that limits the extent of something;

‘I am willing to accept certain restrictions on my movements’;

Limitationnoun

the quality of being limited or restricted;

‘it is a good plan but it has serious limitations’;

Limitationnoun

the greatest amount of something that is possible or allowed;

‘there are limits on the amount you can bet’; ‘it is growing rapidly with no limitation in sight’;

Limitationnoun

(law) a time period after which suits cannot be brought;

‘statute of limitations’;

Limitationnoun

an act of limiting or restricting (as by regulation)

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