VS.

Direct vs. Oversee

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Directadjective

Proceeding without deviation or interruption.

Overseeverb

(literally) To survey, look at something in a wide angle.

Directadjective

Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end.

‘the most direct route between two buildings’;

Overseeverb

(figuratively) To supervise, guide, review or direct the actions of a person or group.

‘It is congress's duty to oversee the spending of federal funds.’;

Directadjective

Straightforward; sincere.

Overseeverb

To inspect, examine

‘Gamekeepers oversee a hunting ground to see to the wildlife's welfare and look for poachers.’;

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Directadjective

Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.

Overseeverb

(obsolete) To fail to see; to overlook, ignore.

Directadjective

In the line of descent; not collateral.

‘a descendant in the direct line’;

Overseeverb

To observe secretly or unintentionally.

Directadjective

(astronomy) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; said of the motion of a celestial body.

Overseeverb

To superintend; to watch over; to direct; to look or see after; to overlook{2}.

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Directadjective

(political science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates.

‘direct nomination; direct legislation’;

Overseeverb

To omit or neglect seeing; to overlook{5}.

Directadjective

having a single flight number.

Overseeverb

To see unintentionally or unexpectedly; - the visual analogy to overhear.

Directadverb

Directly.

Overseeverb

To see too or too much; hence, to be deceived.

‘The most expert gamesters may sometimes oversee.’; ‘Your partiality to me is much overseen, if you think me fit to correct your Latin.’;

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Directverb

To manage, control, steer.

‘to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army’;

Overseeverb

watch and direct;

‘Who is overseeing this project?’;

Directverb

To aim (something) at (something else).

‘They directed their fire towards the men on the wall.’; ‘He directed his question to the room in general.’;

Overseeverb

supervise (a person or their work), especially in an official capacity

‘the Home Secretary oversees the police service’;

Directverb

To point out or show to (somebody) the right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way.

‘He directed me to the left-hand road.’;

Directverb

To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order.

‘She directed them to leave immediately.’;

Directverb

(dated) To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent.

‘to direct a letter’;

Directadjective

Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means.

‘What is direct to, what slides by, the question.’;

Directadjective

Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken.

‘Be even and direct with me.’;

Directadjective

Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.

‘He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words.’; ‘A direct and avowed interference with elections.’;

Directadjective

In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line.

Directadjective

In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; - said of the motion of a celestial body.

Directadjective

Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation.

Directverb

To arrange in a direct or straight line, as against a mark, or towards a goal; to point; to aim; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance.

Directverb

To point out or show to (any one), as the direct or right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way; as, he directed me to the left-hand road.

‘The Lord direct your into the love of God.’; ‘The next points to which I will direct your attention.’;

Directverb

To determine the direction or course of; to cause to go on in a particular manner; to order in the way to a certain end; to regulate; to govern; as, to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army.

‘I will direct their work in truth.’;

Directverb

To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order; as, he directed them to go.

‘I 'll first direct my men what they shall do.’;

Directverb

To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent; to superscribe; as, to direct a letter.

Directverb

To give direction; to point out a course; to act as guide.

‘Wisdom is profitable to direct.’;

Directnoun

A character, thus [ ], placed at the end of a staff on the line or space of the first note of the next staff, to apprise the performer of its situation.

Directverb

command with authority;

‘He directed the children to do their homework’;

Directverb

intend (something) to move towards a certain goal;

‘He aimed his fists towards his opponent's face’; ‘criticism directed at her superior’; ‘direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself’;

Directverb

guide the actors in (plays and films)

Directverb

be in charge of

Directverb

take somebody somewhere;

‘We lead him to our chief’; ‘can you take me to the main entrance?’; ‘He conducted us to the palace’;

Directverb

cause to go somewhere;

‘The explosion sent the car flying in the air’; ‘She sent her children to camp’; ‘He directed all his energies into his dissertation’;

Directverb

aim or direct at; as of blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment;

‘Please don't aim at your little brother!’; ‘He trained his gun on the burglar’; ‘Don't train your camera on the women’; ‘Take a swipe at one's opponent’;

Directverb

lead, as in the performance of a composition;

‘conduct an orchestra; Bairenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years’;

Directverb

give directions to; point somebody into a certain direction;

‘I directed them towards the town hall’;

Directverb

specifically design a product, event, or activity for a certain public

Directverb

direct the course; determine the direction of travelling

Directverb

put an address on (an envelope, for example)

Directverb

plan and direct (a complex undertaking);

‘he masterminded the robbery’;

Directadjective

direct in spatial dimensions; proceeding without deviation or interruption; straight and short;

‘a direct route’; ‘a direct flight’; ‘a direct hit’;

Directadjective

immediate or direct in bearing or force; having nothing intervening;

‘in direct sunlight’; ‘in direct contact with the voters’; ‘direct exposure to the disease’; ‘a direct link’; ‘the direct cause of the accident’;

Directadjective

extended senses; direct in means or manner or behavior or language or action;

‘a direct question’; ‘a direct response’; ‘a direct approach’;

Directadjective

in a straight unbroken line of descent from parent to child;

‘lineal ancestors’; ‘lineal heirs’; ‘a direct descendant of the king’; ‘direct heredity’;

Directadjective

moving from west to east on the celestial sphere; or--for planets--around the sun in the same direction as the Earth

Directadjective

similar in nature or effect or relation to another quantity;

‘a term is in direct proportion to another term if it increases (or decreases) as the other increases (or decreases)’;

Directadjective

of a current flowing in one direction only; not alternating;

‘direct current’;

Directadjective

as an immediate result or consequence;

‘a direct result of the accident’;

Directadjective

in precisely the same words used by a writer or speaker;

‘a direct quotation’; ‘repeated their dialog verbatim’;

Directadjective

effected directly by action of the voters rather than through elected representatives;

‘many people favor direct election of the President rather than election by the Electoral College’;

Directadjective

exact;

‘the direct opposite’;

Directadverb

without deviation;

‘the path leads directly to the lake’; ‘went direct to the office’;

Directadjective

extending or moving from one place to another without changing direction or stopping

‘there was no direct flight that day’;

Directadjective

(of apparent planetary motion) proceeding from west to east in accord with actual motion.

Directadjective

without intervening factors or intermediaries

‘the complications are a direct result of bacteria spreading’; ‘I had no direct contact with Mr Clark’;

Directadjective

(of light or heat) proceeding from a source without being reflected or blocked

‘ferns like a bright position out of direct sunlight’;

Directadjective

(of genealogy) proceeding in continuous succession from parent to child

‘a direct descendant of Edward III’;

Directadjective

(of a quotation) taken from someone's words without being changed.

Directadjective

(of taxation) levied on income or profits rather than on goods or services.

Directadjective

complete (used for emphasis)

‘attitudes which were in direct contrast to the confrontational perspectives of the past’;

Directadjective

(of a person or their behaviour) going straight to the point; frank

‘he is very direct and honest’;

Directadjective

(of evidence or proof) bearing immediately and unambiguously upon the facts at issue

‘there is no direct evidence that officials accepted bribes’;

Directadjective

perpendicular to a surface; not oblique

‘a direct butt joint between surfaces of steel’;

Directadverb

with no one or nothing in between

‘they seem reluctant to deal with me direct’;

Directadverb

by a straight route or without breaking a journey

‘Austrian Airlines are flying direct to Innsbruck again’;

Directverb

control the operations of; manage or govern

‘an economic elite directed the nation's affairs’;

Directverb

supervise and control (a film, play, or other production, or the actors in it)

‘the film is directed by Sir Richard Attenborough’;

Directverb

train and conduct (a group of musicians).

Directverb

aim (something) in a particular direction or at a particular person

‘his smile was directed at Lois’; ‘heating ducts to direct warm air to rear-seat passengers’;

Directverb

tell or show (someone) how to get somewhere

‘can you direct me to the railway station, please?’;

Directverb

address or give instructions for the delivery of (a letter or parcel)

‘put them all in one packet, and direct them to me’;

Directverb

focus (one's thoughts) on or address (one's efforts) towards something.

Directverb

address a comment to or aim a criticism at

‘I suggest that he direct his remarks to the council’; ‘his criticism was directed at the wastage of ammunition’;

Directverb

target a product or advertisement specifically at (someone)

‘the book is directed at the younger reader’;

Directverb

guide or advise in a course or decision

‘the conscience of the credulous prince was directed by saints and bishops’;

Directverb

give (someone) an official order or authoritative instruction

‘the judge directed him to perform community service’; ‘he directed that no picture from his collection could be sold’;

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