VS.

Direct vs. Move

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Directadjective

Proceeding without deviation or interruption.

Moveverb

(intransitive) To change place or posture; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.

‘A ship moves rapidly.’; ‘I was sitting on the sofa for a long time, feeling too lazy to move.’;

Directadjective

Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end.

‘the most direct route between two buildings’;

Moveverb

(intransitive) To act; to take action; to begin to act

‘to move in a matter’; ‘Come on guys, let's move: there's work to do!’;

Directadjective

Straightforward; sincere.

Moveverb

(intransitive) To change residence, for example from one house, town, or state, to another; to go and live at another place. See also move out and move in.

‘I decided to move to the country for a more peaceful life.’; ‘They moved closer to work to cut down commuting time.’;

Directadjective

Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.

Moveverb

To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.

‘The rook moved from a8 to a6.’; ‘My opponent's counter was moving much quicker round the board than mine.’;

Directadjective

In the line of descent; not collateral.

‘a descendant in the direct line’;

Moveverb

To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another

‘The waves moved the boat up and down.’; ‘The horse moves a carriage.’;

Directadjective

(astronomy) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; said of the motion of a celestial body.

Moveverb

To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game

‘She moved the queen closer to the centre of the board.’;

Directadjective

(political science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates.

‘direct nomination; direct legislation’;

Moveverb

(transitive) To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.

‘This song moves me to dance.’;

Directadjective

having a single flight number.

Moveverb

(transitive) To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion, to excite (for example, an emotion).

‘That book really moved me.’;

Directadverb

Directly.

Moveverb

To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit

‘I move to repeal the rule regarding obligatory school uniform.’;

Directverb

To manage, control, steer.

‘to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army’;

Moveverb

To mention; to raise (a question); to suggest (a course of action); to lodge (a complaint).

Directverb

To aim (something) at (something else).

‘They directed their fire towards the men on the wall.’; ‘He directed his question to the room in general.’;

Moveverb

To incite, urge (someone to do something); to solicit (someone for or of an issue); to make a proposal to.

Directverb

To point out or show to (somebody) the right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way.

‘He directed me to the left-hand road.’;

Moveverb

To apply to, as for aid.

Directverb

To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order.

‘She directed them to leave immediately.’;

Moveverb

To request an action from the court.

‘An attorney moved the court to issue a restraining order.’; ‘The district attorney moved for a non-suit.’;

Directverb

(dated) To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent.

‘to direct a letter’;

Moveverb

To bow or salute upon meeting.

Directadjective

Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means.

‘What is direct to, what slides by, the question.’;

Movenoun

The act of moving; a movement.

‘A slight move of the tiller, and the boat will go off course.’;

Directadjective

Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken.

‘Be even and direct with me.’;

Movenoun

An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.

‘He made another move towards becoming a naturalized citizen.’;

Directadjective

Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.

‘He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words.’; ‘A direct and avowed interference with elections.’;

Movenoun

A formalized or practiced action used in athletics, dance, physical exercise, self-defense, hand-to-hand combat, etc.

‘She always gets spontaneous applause for that one move.’; ‘He can win a match with that one move.’;

Directadjective

In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line.

Movenoun

The event of changing one's residence.

‘The move into my fiancé's house took two long days.’; ‘They were pleased about their move to the country.’;

Directadjective

In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; - said of the motion of a celestial body.

Movenoun

A change in strategy.

‘I am worried about our boss's move.’; ‘It was a smart move to bring on a tall striker to play against the smaller defenders.’;

Directadjective

Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation.

Movenoun

A transfer, a change from one employer to another.

Directverb

To arrange in a direct or straight line, as against a mark, or towards a goal; to point; to aim; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance.

Movenoun

(board games) The act of moving a token on a gameboard from one position to another according to the rules of the game.

‘The best move of the game was when he sacrificed his rook in order to gain better possession.’; ‘It's your move! Roll the dice!’; ‘If you roll a six, you can make two moves.’;

Directverb

To point out or show to (any one), as the direct or right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way; as, he directed me to the left-hand road.

‘The Lord direct your into the love of God.’; ‘The next points to which I will direct your attention.’;

Moveverb

To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir; as, the wind moves a vessel; the horse moves a carriage.

Directverb

To determine the direction or course of; to cause to go on in a particular manner; to order in the way to a certain end; to regulate; to govern; as, to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army.

‘I will direct their work in truth.’;

Moveverb

To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another on a playing board, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.

Directverb

To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order; as, he directed them to go.

‘I 'll first direct my men what they shall do.’;

Moveverb

To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.

‘Minds desirous of revenge were not moved with gold.’; ‘No female arts his mind could move.’;

Directverb

To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent; to superscribe; as, to direct a letter.

Moveverb

To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion; to touch pathetically; to excite, as an emotion.

‘When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them.’; ‘[The use of images] in orations and poetry is to move pity or terror.’;

Directverb

To give direction; to point out a course; to act as guide.

‘Wisdom is profitable to direct.’;

Moveverb

To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted; as, to move to adjourn.

‘Let me but move one question to your daughter.’; ‘They are to be blamed alike who move and who decline war upon particular respects.’;

Directnoun

A character, thus [ ], placed at the end of a staff on the line or space of the first note of the next staff, to apprise the performer of its situation.

Moveverb

To apply to, as for aid.

Directverb

command with authority;

‘He directed the children to do their homework’;

Moveverb

To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another; as, a ship moves rapidly.

‘The foundations also of the hills moved and were shaken, because he was wroth.’; ‘On the green bank I sat and listened long, . . . Nor till her lay was ended could I move.’;

Directverb

intend (something) to move towards a certain goal;

‘He aimed his fists towards his opponent's face’; ‘criticism directed at her superior’; ‘direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself’;

Moveverb

To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act; as, to move in a matter.

Directverb

guide the actors in (plays and films)

Moveverb

To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another.

Directverb

be in charge of

Moveverb

To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.

Directverb

take somebody somewhere;

‘We lead him to our chief’; ‘can you take me to the main entrance?’; ‘He conducted us to the palace’;

Movenoun

The act of moving; a movement.

Directverb

cause to go somewhere;

‘The explosion sent the car flying in the air’; ‘She sent her children to camp’; ‘He directed all his energies into his dissertation’;

Movenoun

The act of moving one of the pieces, from one position to another, in the progress of the game; also, the opportunity or obligation to so move a piece; one's turn; as, you can only borrow from the bank in Monopoly when it's your move.

Directverb

aim or direct at; as of blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment;

‘Please don't aim at your little brother!’; ‘He trained his gun on the burglar’; ‘Don't train your camera on the women’; ‘Take a swipe at one's opponent’;

Movenoun

An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.

Directverb

lead, as in the performance of a composition;

‘conduct an orchestra; Bairenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years’;

Movenoun

the act of deciding to do something;

‘he didn't make a move to help’; ‘his first move was to hire a lawyer’;

Directverb

give directions to; point somebody into a certain direction;

‘I directed them towards the town hall’;

Movenoun

the act of changing your residence or place of business;

‘they say that three moves equal one fire’;

Directverb

specifically design a product, event, or activity for a certain public

Movenoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

‘the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise’; ‘movement is a sign of life’; ‘an impatient move of his hand’; ‘gastrointestinal motility’;

Directverb

direct the course; determine the direction of travelling

Movenoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

‘police controlled the motion of the crowd’; ‘the movement of people from the farms to the cities’; ‘his move put him directly in my path’;

Directverb

put an address on (an envelope, for example)

Movenoun

(game) a player's turn to move a piece or take some other permitted action

Directverb

plan and direct (a complex undertaking);

‘he masterminded the robbery’;

Moveverb

change location; move, travel, or proceed;

‘How fast does your new car go?’; ‘We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus’; ‘The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect’; ‘The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell’;

Directadjective

direct in spatial dimensions; proceeding without deviation or interruption; straight and short;

‘a direct route’; ‘a direct flight’; ‘a direct hit’;

Moveverb

cause to move, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense;

‘Move those boxes into the corner, please’; ‘I'm moving my money to another bank’; ‘The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant’;

Directadjective

immediate or direct in bearing or force; having nothing intervening;

‘in direct sunlight’; ‘in direct contact with the voters’; ‘direct exposure to the disease’; ‘a direct link’; ‘the direct cause of the accident’;

Moveverb

move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion;

‘He moved his hand slightly to the right’;

Directadjective

extended senses; direct in means or manner or behavior or language or action;

‘a direct question’; ‘a direct response’; ‘a direct approach’;

Moveverb

change residence, affiliation, or place of employment;

‘We moved from Idaho to Nebraska’; ‘The basketball player moved from one team to another’;

Directadjective

in a straight unbroken line of descent from parent to child;

‘lineal ancestors’; ‘lineal heirs’; ‘a direct descendant of the king’; ‘direct heredity’;

Moveverb

follow a procedure or take a course;

‘We should go farther in this matter’; ‘She went through a lot of trouble’; ‘go about the world in a certain manner’; ‘Messages must go through diplomatic channels’;

Directadjective

moving from west to east on the celestial sphere; or--for planets--around the sun in the same direction as the Earth

Moveverb

be in a state of action;

‘she is always moving’;

Directadjective

similar in nature or effect or relation to another quantity;

‘a term is in direct proportion to another term if it increases (or decreases) as the other increases (or decreases)’;

Moveverb

go or proceed from one point to another;

‘the debate moved from family values to the economy’;

Directadjective

of a current flowing in one direction only; not alternating;

‘direct current’;

Moveverb

perform an action, or work out or perform (an action);

‘think before you act’; ‘We must move quickly’; ‘The governor should act on the new energy bill’; ‘The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel’;

Directadjective

as an immediate result or consequence;

‘a direct result of the accident’;

Moveverb

have an emotional or cognitive impact upon;

‘This child impressed me as unusually mature’; ‘This behavior struck me as odd’;

Directadjective

in precisely the same words used by a writer or speaker;

‘a direct quotation’; ‘repeated their dialog verbatim’;

Moveverb

give an incentive for action;

‘This moved me to sacrifice my career’;

Directadjective

effected directly by action of the voters rather than through elected representatives;

‘many people favor direct election of the President rather than election by the Electoral College’;

Moveverb

arouse sympathy or compassion in;

‘Her fate moved us all’;

Directadjective

exact;

‘the direct opposite’;

Moveverb

dispose of by selling;

‘The chairman of the company told the salesmen to move the computers’;

Directadverb

without deviation;

‘the path leads directly to the lake’; ‘went direct to the office’;

Moveverb

progress by being changed;

‘The speech has to go through several more drafts’; ‘run through your presentation before the meeting’;

Directadjective

extending or moving from one place to another without changing direction or stopping

‘there was no direct flight that day’;

Moveverb

live one's life in a specified environment;

‘she moves in certain circles only’;

Directadjective

(of apparent planetary motion) proceeding from west to east in accord with actual motion.

Moveverb

have a turn; make one's move in a game;

‘Can I go now?’;

Directadjective

without intervening factors or intermediaries

‘the complications are a direct result of bacteria spreading’; ‘I had no direct contact with Mr Clark’;

Moveverb

propose formally; in a debate or parliamentary meeting

Directadjective

(of light or heat) proceeding from a source without being reflected or blocked

‘ferns like a bright position out of direct sunlight’;

Directadjective

(of genealogy) proceeding in continuous succession from parent to child

‘a direct descendant of Edward III’;

Directadjective

(of a quotation) taken from someone's words without being changed.

Directadjective

(of taxation) levied on income or profits rather than on goods or services.

Directadjective

complete (used for emphasis)

‘attitudes which were in direct contrast to the confrontational perspectives of the past’;

Directadjective

(of a person or their behaviour) going straight to the point; frank

‘he is very direct and honest’;

Directadjective

(of evidence or proof) bearing immediately and unambiguously upon the facts at issue

‘there is no direct evidence that officials accepted bribes’;

Directadjective

perpendicular to a surface; not oblique

‘a direct butt joint between surfaces of steel’;

Directadverb

with no one or nothing in between

‘they seem reluctant to deal with me direct’;

Directadverb

by a straight route or without breaking a journey

‘Austrian Airlines are flying direct to Innsbruck again’;

Directverb

control the operations of; manage or govern

‘an economic elite directed the nation's affairs’;

Directverb

supervise and control (a film, play, or other production, or the actors in it)

‘the film is directed by Sir Richard Attenborough’;

Directverb

train and conduct (a group of musicians).

Directverb

aim (something) in a particular direction or at a particular person

‘his smile was directed at Lois’; ‘heating ducts to direct warm air to rear-seat passengers’;

Directverb

tell or show (someone) how to get somewhere

‘can you direct me to the railway station, please?’;

Directverb

address or give instructions for the delivery of (a letter or parcel)

‘put them all in one packet, and direct them to me’;

Directverb

focus (one's thoughts) on or address (one's efforts) towards something.

Directverb

address a comment to or aim a criticism at

‘I suggest that he direct his remarks to the council’; ‘his criticism was directed at the wastage of ammunition’;

Directverb

target a product or advertisement specifically at (someone)

‘the book is directed at the younger reader’;

Directverb

guide or advise in a course or decision

‘the conscience of the credulous prince was directed by saints and bishops’;

Directverb

give (someone) an official order or authoritative instruction

‘the judge directed him to perform community service’; ‘he directed that no picture from his collection could be sold’;

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