VS.

Dip vs. Jump

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Dipnoun

A lower section of a road or geological feature.

‘There is a dip in the road ahead.’;

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To propel oneself rapidly upward, downward and/or in any horizontal direction such that momentum causes the body to become airborne.

‘The boy jumped over a fence.’; ‘Kangaroos are known for their ability to jump high.’;

Dipnoun

Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To cause oneself to leave an elevated location and fall downward.

‘She is going to jump from the diving board.’;

Dipnoun

The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To pass by a spring or leap; to overleap.

‘to jump a stream’;

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Dipnoun

A tank or trough where cattle or sheep are immersed in chemicals to kill parasites.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To employ a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.

Dipnoun

A dip stick.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To react to a sudden, often unexpected, stimulus (such as a sharp prick or a loud sound) by jerking the body violently.

‘The sudden sharp sound made me jump.’;

Dipnoun

A swim, usually a short swim to refresh.

‘I'm going for a dip before breakfast.’;

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To employ a move in certain board games where one game piece is moved from one legal position to another passing over the position of another piece.

‘The player's knight jumped the opponent's bishop.’;

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Dipnoun

A pickpocket.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To move to a position in (a queue/line) that is further forward.

‘I hate it when people jump the queue.’;

Dipnoun

A sauce for dipping.

‘This onion dip is just scrumptious.’;

Jumpverb

(transitive) To attack suddenly and violently.

‘The hoodlum jumped a woman in the alley.’;

Dipnoun

(geology) The angle from horizontal of a planar geologic surface, such as a fault line.

Jumpverb

To engage in sexual intercourse with (a person).

‘Harold: How is Sarah? I don't want to jump her while she's The Big Chill.’;

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Dipnoun

(archaic) A dipped candle.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To cause to jump.

‘The rider jumped the horse over the fence.’;

Dipnoun

(dance) a move in many different styles of partner dances, often performed at the end of a dance, in which the follower leans far to the side and is supported by the leader

Jumpverb

(transitive) To move the distance between two opposing subjects.

Dipnoun

A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the performer, resting on his hands, lets his arms bend and his body sink until his chin is level with the bars, and then raises himself by straightening his arms.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To increase the height of a tower crane by inserting a section at the base of the tower and jacking up everything above it.

Dipnoun

In the turpentine industry, the viscid exudation that is dipped out from incisions in the trees. Virgin dip is the runnings of the first year, yellow dip the runnings of subsequent years.

Jumpverb

To increase speed aggressively and without warning.

Dipnoun

(aeronautics) A sudden drop followed by a climb, usually to avoid obstacles or as the result of getting into an airhole.

Jumpverb

To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.

Dipnoun

(uncountable) The moist form of snuff tobacco.

Jumpverb

To join by a buttweld.

Dipnoun

The act of missing out on seeing a sought after bird.

Jumpverb

To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset.

Dipnoun

A foolish person.

Jumpverb

(quarrying) To bore with a jumper.

Dipnoun

(informal) A diplomat.

Jumpverb

(obsolete) To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; followed by with.

Dipverb

(transitive) To lower into a liquid.

‘Dip your biscuit into your tea.’;

Jumpverb

To start executing code from a different location, rather than following the program counter.

Dipverb

(intransitive) To immerse oneself; to become plunged in a liquid; to sink.

Jumpverb

To flee; to make one's escape.

Dipverb

(intransitive) (of a value or rate) To decrease slightly.

Jumpnoun

The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.

Dipverb

(transitive) To lower a light's beam.

‘Dip your lights as you meet an oncoming car.’;

Jumpnoun

An effort; an attempt; a venture.

Dipverb

(transitive) To lower (a flag), particularly a national ensign, to a partially hoisted position in order to render or to return a salute. While lowered, the flag is said to be “at the dip.” A flag being carried on a staff may be dipped by leaning it forward at an approximate angle of 45 degrees.

‘“The sailor rushed to the flag hoist to dip the flag in return.”’;

Jumpnoun

(mining) A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.

Dipverb

(transitive) To treat cattle or sheep by immersion in chemical solution.

‘The farmer is going to dip the cattle today.’;

Jumpnoun

(architecture) An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.

Dipverb

(transitive) To use a dip stick to check oil level in an engine.

Jumpnoun

An instance of propelling oneself upwards.

‘The boy took a skip and a jump down the lane.’;

Dipverb

To consume snuff by placing a pinch behind the lip or under the tongue so that the active chemical constituents of the snuff may be absorbed into the system for their narcotic effect.

Jumpnoun

An object which causes one to jump, a ramp.

‘He went off a jump.’;

Dipverb

(transitive) To immerse for baptism.

Jumpnoun

An instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location.

‘There were a couple of jumps from the bridge.’;

Dipverb

(transitive) To wet, as if by immersing; to moisten.

Jumpnoun

An instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.

‘She was terrified before the jump, but was thrilled to be skydiving.’;

Dipverb

(intransitive) To plunge or engage thoroughly in any affair.

Jumpnoun

An instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body.

Dipverb

(transitive) To take out, by dipping a dipper, ladle, or other receptacle, into a fluid and removing a part; often with out.

‘to dip water from a boiler; to dip out water’;

Jumpnoun

A jumping move in a board game.

‘the knight's jump in chess’;

Dipverb

(intransitive) To perform the action of plunging a dipper, ladle. etc. into a liquid or soft substance and removing a part.

Jumpnoun

A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) used to make a video game character jump (propel itself upwards).

‘Press jump to start.’;

Dipverb

(transitive) To engage as a pledge; to mortgage.

Jumpnoun

An obstacle that forms part of a showjumping course, and that the horse has to jump over cleanly.

‘Heartless managed the scale the first jump but fell over the second.’;

Dipverb

(transitive) To perform (a bow or curtsey) by inclining the body.

Jumpnoun

(with on) An early start or an advantage.

‘He got a jump on the day because he had laid out everything the night before.’; ‘Their research department gave them the jump on the competition.’;

Dipverb

(intransitive) To incline downward from the plane of the horizon.

‘Strata of rock dip.’;

Jumpnoun

(mathematics) A discontinuity in the graph of a function, where the function is continuous in a punctured interval of the discontinuity.

Dipverb

To perform a dip dance move (often phrased with the leader as the subject noun and the follower as the subject noun being dipped)

Jumpnoun

(science fiction) An instance of faster-than-light travel, not observable from ordinary space.

Dipverb

To lower the body by bending the knees while keeping the body in an upright position, as in movement to the rhythm of music.

Jumpnoun

(programming) A change of the path of execution to a different location.

Dipverb

To leave.

‘He dipped out of the room so fast.’;

Jumpnoun

A kind of loose jacket for men.

Dipverb

To miss out on seeing a sought after bird.

Jumpadverb

(obsolete) exactly; precisely

Dipverb

To plunge or immerse; especially, to put for a moment into a liquid; to insert into a fluid and withdraw again.

‘The priest shall dip his finger in the blood.’; ‘[Wat'ry fowl] now dip their pinions in the briny deep.’; ‘While the prime swallow dips his wing.’;

Jumpadjective

(obsolete) Exact; matched; fitting; precise.

Dipverb

To immerse for baptism; to baptize by immersion.

Jumpnoun

A kind of loose jacket for men.

Dipverb

To wet, as if by immersing; to moisten.

‘A cold shuddering dewDips me all o'er.’;

Jumpnoun

The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.

Dipverb

To plunge or engage thoroughly in any affair.

‘He was . . . dipt in the rebellion of the Commons.’;

Jumpnoun

An effort; an attempt; a venture.

‘Our fortune liesUpon thisjump.’;

Dipverb

To take out, by dipping a dipper, ladle, or other receptacle, into a fluid and removing a part; - often with out; as, to dip water from a boiler; to dip out water.

Jumpnoun

The space traversed by a leap.

Dipverb

To engage as a pledge; to mortgage.

‘Live on the use and never dip thy lands.’;

Jumpnoun

A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.

Dipverb

To immerse one's self; to become plunged in a liquid; to sink.

‘The sun's rim dips; the stars rush out.’;

Jumpnoun

An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.

Dipverb

To perform the action of plunging some receptacle, as a dipper, ladle. etc.; into a liquid or a soft substance and removing a part.

‘Whoever dips too deep will find death in the pot.’;

Jumpnoun

A jump-start; as, to get a jump from a passing mmotorist.

Dipverb

To pierce; to penetrate; - followed by in or into.

‘When I dipt into the future.’;

Jumpnoun

same as jump-start, n..

Dipverb

To enter slightly or cursorily; to engage one's self desultorily or by the way; to partake limitedly; - followed by in or into.

Jumpverb

To spring free from the ground by the muscular action of the feet and legs; to project one's self through the air; to spring; to bound; to leap.

‘Not the worst of the three but jumps twelve foot and a half by the square.’;

Dipverb

To incline downward from the plane of the horizon; as, strata of rock dip.

Jumpverb

To move as if by jumping; to bounce; to jolt.

‘A flock of geese jump down together.’;

Dipverb

To dip snuff.

Jumpverb

To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; - followed by with.

Dipnoun

The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid.

Jumpverb

To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream.

Dipnoun

Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch.

Jumpverb

To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch.

Dipnoun

a hollow or depression in a surface, especially in the ground.

Jumpverb

To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.

‘To jump a body with a dangerous physic.’;

Dipnoun

A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon.

Jumpverb

To join by a butt weld.

Dipnoun

A dipped candle.

Jumpverb

To bore with a jumper.

Dipnoun

A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the performer, resting on his hands, lets his arms bend and his body sink until his chin is level with the bars, and then raises himself by straightening his arms.

Jumpverb

same as jump-start, v. t..

Dipnoun

In the turpentine industry, the viscid exudation, which is dipped out from incisions in the trees; as, virgin dip (the runnings of the first year), yellow dip (the runnings of subsequent years).

Jumpadjective

Nice; exact; matched; fitting; precise.

Dipnoun

A sudden drop followed by a climb, usually to avoid obstacles or as the result of getting into an airhole.

Jumpadverb

Exactly; pat.

Dipnoun

a liquid, in which objects are soaked by dipping; e.g., a parasiticide or insecticide solution into which animals are dipped (see sheep-dip).

Jumpnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

‘a jump in attendance’;

Dipnoun

a sauce into which foods are dipped to enhance the flavor; e. g., an onion dip made from sour cream and dried onions, into which potato chips are dipped.

Jumpnoun

an abrupt transition;

‘a successful leap from college to the major leagues’;

Dipnoun

a pickpocket.

Jumpnoun

(film) an abrupt transition from one scene to another

Dipnoun

a depression in an otherwise level surface;

‘there was a dip in the road’;

Jumpnoun

a sudden involuntary movement;

‘he awoke with a start’;

Dipnoun

(physics) the angle that a magnetic needle makes with the plane of the horizon

Jumpnoun

descent with a parachute;

‘he had done a lot of parachuting in the army’;

Dipnoun

a thief who steals from the pockets or purses of others in public places

Jumpnoun

the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground;

‘he advanced in a series of jumps’; ‘the jumping was unexpected’;

Dipnoun

tasty mixture or liquid into which bite-sized foods are dipped

Jumpverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Dipnoun

a brief immersion

Jumpverb

move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm;

‘She startled when I walked into the room’;

Dipnoun

a sudden sharp decrease in some quantity;

‘a drop of 57 points on the Dow Jones index’; ‘there was a drop in pressure in the pulmonary artery’; ‘a dip in prices’; ‘when that became known the price of their stock went into free fall’;

Jumpverb

make a sudden physical attack on;

‘The muggers jumped the woman in the fur coat’;

Dipnoun

a candle that is made by repeated dipping in a pool of wax or tallow

Jumpverb

increase suddenly and significantly;

‘Prices jumped overnight’;

Dipnoun

a brief swim in water

Jumpverb

be highly noticeable

Dipnoun

a gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the body is lowered and raised by bending and straightening the arms

Jumpverb

enter eagerly into;

‘He jumped into the game’;

Dipverb

immerse briefly into a liquid so as to wet, coat, or saturate;

‘dip the garment into the cleaning solution’; ‘dip the brush into the paint’;

Jumpverb

rise in rank or status;

‘Her new novel jumped high on the bestseller list’;

Dipverb

dip into a liquid while eating;

‘She dunked the piece of bread in the sauce’;

Jumpverb

run off or leave the rails;

‘the train derailed because a cow was standing on the tracks’;

Dipverb

go down momentarily;

‘Prices dipped’;

Jumpverb

jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute

Dipverb

stain an object by immersing it in a liquid

Jumpverb

cause to jump or leap;

‘the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop’;

Dipverb

switch (a car's headlights) from a higher to a lower beam

Jumpverb

start a car engine whose battery by connecting it to another car's battery

Dipverb

lower briefly;

‘She dipped her knee’;

Jumpverb

bypass;

‘He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible’;

Dipverb

appear to move downward;

‘The sun dipped below the horizon’; ‘The setting sun sank below the tree line’;

Jumpverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

‘leap into fame’; ‘jump to a conclusion’;

Dipverb

slope downwards;

‘Our property dips towards the river’;

Jumpverb

go back and forth; swing back and forth between two states or conditions

Dipverb

dip into a liquid;

‘He dipped into the pool’;

Dipverb

of candles; by dipping the wick into hot, liquid wax

Dipverb

immerse in a disinfectant solution;

‘dip the sheep’;

Dipverb

scoop up by plunging one's hand or a ladle below the surface;

‘dip water out of a container’;

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