VS.

Dike vs. Polder

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Dikeverb

: to dig a ditch; to raise an earthwork; etc.

Poldernoun

(geography) An area of ground reclaimed from a sea or lake by means of dikes.

Dikeverb

To be well dressed.

Polderverb

To reclaim an area of ground from a sea or lake by means of dikes.

Dikenoun

A well-dressed man.

Poldernoun

A tract of low land reclaimed from the sea by of high embankments.

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Dikenoun

Formalwear or other fashionable dress.

Polder

A polder (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈpɔldər] (listen)) is a low-lying tract of land that forms an artificial hydrological entity, enclosed by embankments known as dikes. The three types of polder are: Land reclaimed from a body of water, such as a lake or the seabed Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike Marshes separated from the surrounding water by a dike and subsequently drained; these are also known as koogs, especially in GermanyThe ground level in drained marshes subsides over time.

Dikenoun

: a masculine woman; a lesbian.

Dikenoun

A ditch; a channel for water made by digging.

‘Little channels or dikes cut to every bed.’;

Dikenoun

An embankment to prevent inundations; a levee.

‘Dikes that the hands of the farmers had raised . . . Shut out the turbulent tides.’;

Dikenoun

A wall of turf or stone.

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Dikenoun

A wall-like mass of mineral matter, usually an intrusion of igneous rocks, filling up rents or fissures in the original strata.

Dikeverb

To surround or protect with a dike or dry bank; to secure with a bank.

Dikeverb

To drain by a dike or ditch.

Dikeverb

To work as a ditcher; to dig.

‘He would thresh and thereto dike and delve.’;

Dikenoun

offensive terms for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine

Dikenoun

a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea

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Dikeverb

enclose with a dike;

‘dike the land to protect it from water’;

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