VS.

Dialect vs. Vernacular

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Main Difference

The main difference between Dialect and Vernacular is that the Dialect is a variety of a language and Vernacular is a common speech variety of a specific population, as opposed to standard, national, literary or scientific idiom.

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Wikipedia
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  • Dialect (noun)

    A variety of a language that is characteristic of a particular area, community{{,}} or group, often differing from other varieties of the same language in minor ways as regards vocabulary, style, spelling and pronunciation.

  • Dialect (noun)

    Language that is perceived as substandard or wrong.

  • Dialect (noun)

    A language (often a regional or minority language) as part of a group or family of languages, especially if they are viewed as a single language, or if contrasted with a standardized variety that is considered the 'true' form of the language (for example, Cantonese as contrasted with Mandarin Chinese, or Bavarian as contrasted with German).

    "patois q|often derogatory"

  • Dialect (noun)

    A variant of a non-standardized programming language.

    "Home computers in the 1980s had many incompatible dialects of BASIC."

  • Dialect (noun)

    A variant form of the vocalizations of a bird species restricted to a certain area or population.

  • Vernacular (noun)

    The language of a people or a national language.

    "A vernacular of the United States is English."

  • Vernacular (noun)

    Everyday speech or dialect, including colloquialisms, as opposed to standard, literary, liturgical, or scientific idiom.

    "Street vernacular can be quite different from what is heard elsewhere."

  • Vernacular (noun)

    Language unique to a particular group of people; jargon, argot.

    "For those of a certain age, hiphop vernacular might just as well be a foreign language."

  • Vernacular (noun)

    The indigenous language of a people, into which the words of the Mass are translated.

    "Vatican II allowed the celebration of the mass in the vernacular."

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    Of or pertaining to everyday language, as opposed to standard, literary, liturgical, or scientific idiom.

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    Belonging to the country of one's birth; one's own by birth or nature; native; indigenous.

    "a vernacular disease"

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    Of or related to local building materials and styles; not imported.

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    Connected to a collective memory; not imported.

Wiktionary
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  • Dialect (noun)

    a particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group

    "the Lancashire dialect seemed like a foreign language"

  • Dialect (noun)

    a particular version of a programming language.

  • Vernacular (noun)

    the language or dialect spoken by the ordinary people in a particular country or region

    "he wrote in the vernacular to reach a larger audience"

  • Vernacular (noun)

    the terminology used by people belonging to a specified group or engaging in a specialized activity

    "gardening vernacular"

  • Vernacular (noun)

    architecture concerned with domestic and functional rather than public or monumental buildings

    "buildings in which Gothic merged into farmhouse vernacular"

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    (of language) spoken as one's mother tongue; not learned or imposed as a second language.

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    (of speech or written works) using the mother tongue of a country or region

    "vernacular literature"

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    (of architecture) concerned with domestic and functional rather than public or monumental buildings

    "vernacular buildings"

Oxford Dictionary
  • Dialect (noun)

    Means or mode of expressing thoughts; language; tongue; form of speech.

  • Dialect (noun)

    The form of speech of a limited region or people, as distinguished from ether forms nearly related to it; a variety or subdivision of a language; speech characterized by local peculiarities or specific circumstances; as, the Ionic and Attic were dialects of Greece; the Yorkshire dialect; the dialect of the learned.

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    Belonging to the country of one's birth; one's own by birth or nature; native; indigenous; - now used chiefly of language; as, English is our vernacular language.

  • Vernacular (noun)

    The vernacular language; one's mother tongue; often, the common forms of expression in a particular locality, opposed to literary or learned forms.

Webster Dictionary
  • Dialect (noun)

    the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people;

    "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"

    "he has a strong German accent"

  • Vernacular (noun)

    a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves);

    "they don't speak our lingo"

  • Vernacular (noun)

    the everyday speech of the people (as distinguished from literary language)

  • Vernacular (adjective)

    being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language;

    "common parlance"

    "a vernacular term"

    "vernacular speakers"

    "the vulgar tongue of the masses"

    "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species"

Princeton's WordNet

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