VS.

Desire vs. Fancy

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Desireverb

To want; to wish for earnestly.

‘I desire to speak with you.’;

Fancynoun

The imagination.

Desireverb

To put a request to (someone); to entreat.

Fancynoun

An image or representation of anything formed in the mind.

Desireverb

To want emotionally or sexually.

‘She has desired him since they first met.’;

Fancynoun

An opinion or notion formed without much reflection.

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Desireverb

To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.

Fancynoun

A whim.

‘I had a fancy to learn to play the flute.’;

Desireverb

To require; to demand; to claim.

Fancynoun

Love or amorous attachment.

‘He took a fancy to her.’;

Desireverb

To miss; to regret.

Fancynoun

The object of inclination or liking.

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Desirenoun

(countable) Someone or something wished for.

‘It is my desire to speak with you.’; ‘You’re my heart’s desire.’;

Fancynoun

Any sport or hobby pursued by a group.

‘Trainspotting is the fancy of a special lot.’; ‘the cat fancy’;

Desirenoun

(uncountable) Strong attraction, particularly romantic or sexual.

‘His desire for her kept him awake at night.’;

Fancynoun

The enthusiasts of such a pursuit.

‘He fell out of favor with the boxing fancy after the incident.’;

Desirenoun

(uncountable) The feeling of desiring; an eager longing for something.

‘Too much desire can seriously affect one’s judgment.’;

Fancynoun

A diamond with a distinctive colour.

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Desirenoun

(uncountable) Motivation.

Fancynoun

That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

Desireverb

To long for; to wish for earnestly; to covet.

‘Neither shall any man desire thy land.’; ‘Ye desire your child to live.’;

Fancynoun

(obsolete) A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

Desireverb

To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.

‘Then she said, Did I desire a son of my lord?’; ‘Desire him to go in; trouble him no more.’;

Fancynoun

In the game of jacks, a style of play involving additional actions (contrasted with plainsies).

Desireverb

To require; to demand; to claim.

‘A doleful case desires a doleful song.’;

Fancyadjective

Decorative.

‘This is a fancy shawl.’;

Desireverb

To miss; to regret.

‘She shall be pleasant while she lives, and desired when she dies.’;

Fancyadjective

Of a superior grade.

‘This box contains bottles of the fancy grade of jelly.’;

Desirenoun

The natural longing that is excited by the enjoyment or the thought of any good, and impels to action or effort its continuance or possession; an eager wish to obtain or enjoy.

‘Unspeakable desire to see and know.’;

Fancyadjective

Executed with skill.

‘He initiated the game winning play with a fancy, deked saucer pass to the winger.’;

Desirenoun

An expressed wish; a request; petition.

‘And slowly was my mother broughtTo yield consent to my desire.’;

Fancyadjective

(colloquial) Unnecessarily complicated.

‘I'm not keen on him and his fancy ideas.’;

Desirenoun

Anything which is desired; an object of longing.

‘The Desire of all nations shall come.’;

Fancyadjective

(obsolete) Extravagant; above real value.

Desirenoun

Excessive or morbid longing; lust; appetite.

Fancyadverb

(nonstandard) In a fancy manner; fancily.

Desirenoun

Grief; regret.

Fancyverb

(formal) To appreciate without jealousy or greed.

‘I fancy your new car, but I like my old one just fine.’;

Desirenoun

the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state

Fancyverb

(British) would like

‘I fancy a burger tonight for dinner.’; ‘Do you fancy going to town this weekend?’;

Desirenoun

an inclination to want things;

‘a man of many desires’;

Fancyverb

To be sexually attracted to.

‘I fancy that girl over there.’;

Desirenoun

something that is desired

Fancyverb

(dated) To imagine, suppose.

‘I fancy you'll want something to drink after your long journey.’; ‘Fancy meeting you here!’; ‘Fancy that! I saw Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy kissing in the garden.’;

Desireverb

feel or have a desire for; want strongly;

‘I want to go home now’; ‘I want my own room’;

Fancyverb

To form a conception of; to portray in the mind.

Desireverb

expect and wish;

‘I trust you will behave better from now on’; ‘I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise’;

Fancyverb

To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

Desireverb

express a desire for

Fancyverb

(transitive) To breed (animals) as a hobby.

Desire

Desires are states of mind that are expressed by terms like , , or . A great variety of features is commonly associated with desires.

‘wanting’; ‘wishing’; ‘longing’; ‘craving’;

Fancynoun

The faculty by which the mind forms an image or a representation of anything perceived before; the power of combining and modifying such objects into new pictures or images; the power of readily and happily creating and recalling such objects for the purpose of amusement, wit, or embellishment; imagination.

‘In the soulAre many lesser faculties, that serveReason as chief. Among these fancy nextHer office holds.’;

Fancynoun

An image or representation of anything formed in the mind; conception; thought; idea; conceit.

‘How now, my lord ! why do you keep alone,Of sorriest fancies your companoins making ?’;

Fancynoun

An opinion or notion formed without much reflection; caprice; whim; impression.

‘I have always had a fancy that learning might be made a play and recreation to children.’;

Fancynoun

Inclination; liking, formed by caprice rather than reason; as, to strike one's fancy; hence, the object of inclination or liking.

‘To fit your fancies to your father's will.’;

Fancynoun

That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

‘London pride is a pretty fancy for borders.’;

Fancynoun

A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

‘At a great book sale in London, which had congregated all the fancy.’;

Fancyverb

To figure to one's self; to believe or imagine something without proof.

‘If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know.’;

Fancyverb

To love.

Fancyverb

To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine.

‘He whom I fancy, but can ne'er express.’;

Fancyverb

To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

Fancyverb

To believe without sufficient evidence; to imagine (something which is unreal).

‘He fancied he was welcome, because those arounde him were his kinsmen.’;

Fancyadjective

Adapted to please the fancy or taste, especially when of high quality or unusually appealing; ornamental; as, fancy goods; fancy clothes.

Fancyadjective

Extravagant; above real value.

‘This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania, like that which led his [Frederick the Great's] father to pay fancy prices for giants.’;

Fancynoun

something many people believe that is false;

‘they have the illusion that I am very wealthy’;

Fancynoun

fancy was held by Coleridge to be more casual and superficial than imagination

Fancynoun

a predisposition to like something;

‘he had a fondness for whiskey’;

Fancyverb

imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind;

‘I can't see him on horseback!’; ‘I can see what will happen’; ‘I can see a risk in this strategy’;

Fancyverb

have a fancy or particular liking or desire for;

‘She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window’;

Fancyadjective

not plain; decorative or ornamented;

‘fancy handwriting’; ‘fancy clothes’;

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