VS.

Dent vs. Hole

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Dentnoun

A shallow deformation in the surface of an object, produced by an impact.

‘The crash produced a dent in the left side of the car.’;

Holenoun

A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.

‘There’s a hole in my shoe.’; ‘Her stocking has a hole in it.’;

Dentnoun

A type of maize/corn with a relatively soft outer hull, and a soft type of starch that shrinks at maturity to leave an indentation in the surface of the kernel.

Holenoun

An opening in a solid.

‘There’s a hole in my bucket.’;

Dentnoun

A sudden negative change, such as loss, damage, weakening, consumption or diminution, especially one produced by an external force, event or action

‘That purchase put a bit of a dent in my wallet.’;

Holenoun

(heading) In games.

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Dentnoun

(engineering) A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.

Holenoun

(golf) A subsurface standard-size hole, also called cup, hitting the ball into which is the object of play. Each hole, of which there are usually eighteen as the standard on a full course, is located on a prepared surface, called the green, of a particular type grass.

Dentnoun

(weaving) A slot or a wire in a reed

Holenoun

(golf) The part of a game in which a player attempts to hit the ball into one of the holes.

‘I played 18 holes yesterday.’; ‘The second hole today cost me three strokes over par.’;

Dentverb

(transitive) To impact something, producing a dent.

Holenoun

(baseball) The rear portion of the defensive team between the shortstop and the third baseman.

‘The shortstop ranged deep into the hole to make the stop.’;

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Dentverb

(intransitive) To develop a dent or dents.

‘Copper is soft and dents easily.’;

Holenoun

(chess) A square on the board, with some positional significance, that a player does not, and cannot in future, control with a friendly pawn.

Dentnoun

A stroke; a blow.

Holenoun

(stud poker) A card (also called a hole card) dealt face down thus unknown to all but its holder; the status in which such a card is.

Dentnoun

A slight depression, or small notch or hollow, made by a blow or by pressure; an indentation.

‘A blow that would have made a dent in a pound of butter.’;

Holenoun

In the game of fives, part of the floor of the court between the step and the pepperbox.

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Dentnoun

A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.

Holenoun

An excavation pit or trench.

Dentverb

To make a dent upon; to indent.

‘The houses dented with bullets.’;

Holenoun

(figuratively) A weakness, a flaw

‘I have found a hole in your argument.’;

Dentnoun

an appreciable consequence (especially a lessening);

‘it made a dent in my bank account’;

Holenoun

(informal) A container or receptacle.

‘car hole;’; ‘brain hole’;

Dentnoun

a depression scratched or carved into a surface

Holenoun

(physics) In semiconductors, a lack of an electron in an occupied band behaving like a positively charged particle.

Dentnoun

an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)

Holenoun

(computing) A security vulnerability in software which can be taken advantage of by an exploit.

Dentverb

make a depression into;

‘The bicycle dented my car’;

Holenoun

(slang anatomy) An orifice, in particular the anus. When used with shut it always refers to the mouth.

‘Just shut your hole!’;

Holenoun

Sex, or a sex partner.

‘Are you going out to get your hole tonight?’;

Holenoun

Solitary confinement, a high-security prison cell often used as punishment.

Holenoun

(slang) An undesirable place to live or visit; a hovel.

‘His apartment is a hole!’;

Holenoun

(figurative) Difficulty, in particular, debt.

‘If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.’;

Holenoun

(graph theory) A chordless cycle in a graph.

Holeverb

(transitive) To make holes in (an object or surface).

‘Shrapnel holed the ship's hull.’;

Holeverb

To destroy.

‘She completely holed the argument.’;

Holeverb

(intransitive) To go into a hole.

Holeverb

(transitive) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball or golf ball.

‘Woods holed a standard three foot putt’;

Holeverb

(transitive) To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in.

‘to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars’;

Holeadjective

Whole.

Holenoun

A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.

‘The holes where eyes should be.’; ‘The blind wallsWere full of chinks and holes.’; ‘The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.’;

Holenoun

An excavation in the ground, made by an animal to live in, or a natural cavity inhabited by an animal; hence, a low, narrow, or dark lodging or place; a mean habitation.

‘The foxes have holes, . . . but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.’;

Holenoun

A small cavity used in some games, usually one into which a marble or ball is to be played or driven; hence, a score made by playing a marble or ball into such a hole, as in golf.

Holeverb

To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in; as, to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars.

Holeverb

To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball.

Holeverb

To go or get into a hole.

Holenoun

an opening into or through something

Holenoun

an opening deliberately made in or through something

Holenoun

one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course;

‘he played 18 holes’;

Holenoun

an unoccupied space

Holenoun

a depression hollowed out of solid matter

Holenoun

a fault;

‘he shot holes in my argument’;

Holenoun

informal terms for a difficult situation;

‘he got into a terrible fix’; ‘he made a muddle of his marriage’;

Holenoun

informal terms for the mouth

Holeverb

hit the ball into the hole

Holeverb

make holes in

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