VS.

Cure vs. Sinecure

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Curenoun

A method, device or medication that restores good health.

Sinecurenoun

A position that requires no work but still gives an ample payment; a cushy job.

Curenoun

Act of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health from disease, or to soundness after injury.

Sinecurenoun

(historical) An ecclesiastical benefice without the care of souls.

Curenoun

A solution to a problem.

Sinecureverb

(transitive) To put or place in a sinecure.

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Curenoun

A process of preservation, as by smoking.

Sinecurenoun

An ecclesiastical benefice without the care of souls.

Curenoun

A process of solidification or gelling.

Sinecurenoun

Any office or position which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labor, or active service.

‘A lucrative sinecure in the Excise.’;

Curenoun

(engineering) A process whereby a material is caused to form permanent molecular linkages by exposure to chemicals, heat, pressure and/or weathering.

Sinecureverb

To put or place in a sinecure.

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Curenoun

(obsolete) Care, heed, or attention.

Sinecurenoun

a benefice to which no spiritual or pastoral duties are attached

Curenoun

Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate.

Sinecurenoun

an office that involves minimal duties

Curenoun

That which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate; a curacy.

Sinecure

A sinecure ( or ; from Latin sine 'without' and cura 'care') is an office, carrying a salary or otherwise generating income, that requires or involves little or no responsibility, labour, or active service. The term originated in the medieval church, where it signified a post without any responsibility for the , the regular liturgical and pastoral functions of a cleric, but came to be applied to any post, secular or ecclesiastical, that involved little or no actual work.

‘cure [care] of souls’;

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Cureverb

(transitive) To restore to health.

‘Unaided nature cured him.’;

Cureverb

(transitive) To bring (a disease or its bad effects) to an end.

‘Unaided nature cured his ailments.’;

Cureverb

(transitive) To cause to be rid of (a defect).

‘Experience will cure him of his naïveté.’;

Cureverb

(transitive) To prepare or alter especially by chemical or physical processing for keeping or use.

‘The smoke and heat cures the meat.’;

Cureverb

(intransitive) To bring about a cure of any kind.

Cureverb

(intransitive) To be undergoing a chemical or physical process for preservation or use.

‘The meat was put in the smokehouse to cure.’;

Cureverb

(intransitive) To solidify or gel.

‘The parts were curing in the autoclave.’;

Cureverb

To become healed.

Cureverb

(obsolete) To pay heed; to care; to give attention.

Curenoun

Care, heed, or attention.

‘Of study took he most cure and most heed.’; ‘Vicarages of greatcure, but small value.’;

Curenoun

Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate; hence, that which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate; a curacy; as, to resign a cure; to obtain a cure.

‘The appropriator was the incumbent parson, and had the cure of the souls of the parishioners.’;

Curenoun

Medical or hygienic care; remedial treatment of disease; a method of medical treatment; as, to use the water cure.

Curenoun

Act of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health from disease, or to soundness after injury.

‘Past hope! pastcure! past help.’; ‘I do cures to-day and to-morrow.’;

Curenoun

Means of the removal of disease or evil; that which heals; a remedy; a restorative.

‘Cold, hunger, prisons, ills without a cure.’; ‘The proper cure of such prejudices.’;

Curenoun

A curate; a pardon.

Cureverb

To heal; to restore to health, soundness, or sanity; to make well; - said of a patient.

‘The child was cured from that very hour.’;

Cureverb

To subdue or remove by remedial means; to remedy; to remove; to heal; - said of a malady.

‘To cure this deadly grief.’; ‘Then he called his twelve disciples together, and gave them power . . . to cure diseases.’;

Cureverb

To set free from (something injurious or blameworthy), as from a bad habit.

‘I never knew any man cured of inattention.’;

Cureverb

To prepare for preservation or permanent keeping; to preserve, as by drying, salting, etc.; as, to cure beef or fish; to cure hay.

Cureverb

To pay heed; to care; to give attention.

Cureverb

To restore health; to effect a cure.

‘Whose smile and frown, like to Achilles' spear,Is able with the change to kill and cure.’;

Cureverb

To become healed.

‘One desperate grief cures with another's languish.’;

Curenoun

a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain

Cureverb

provide a cure for, make healthy again;

‘The treatment cured the boy's acne’; ‘The quack pretended to heal patients but never managed to’;

Cureverb

prepare by drying, salting, or chemical processing in order to preserve;

‘cure meats’; ‘cure pickles’;

Cureverb

make (substances) hard and improve their usability;

‘cure resin’;

Cureverb

be or become preserved;

‘the apricots cure in the sun’;

Cureverb

relieve (a person or animal) of the symptoms of a disease or condition

‘he was cured of the disease’;

Cureverb

eliminate (a disease or condition) with medical treatment

‘this technology could be used to cure diabetes’;

Cureverb

solve (a problem)

‘a bid to trace and cure the gearbox problems’;

Cureverb

preserve (meat, fish, tobacco, or an animal skin) by salting, drying, or smoking

‘home-cured ham’;

Cureverb

harden (rubber, plastic, concrete, etc.) after manufacture by a chemical process such as vulcanization

‘the early synthetic rubbers were much more difficult to cure than natural rubber’;

Cureverb

undergo hardening by a chemical process

‘the mastic takes days to cure’;

Curenoun

a parish priest in a French-speaking country.

Cure

A cure is a substance or procedure that ends a medical condition, such as a medication, a surgical operation, a change in lifestyle or even a philosophical mindset that helps end a person's sufferings; or the state of being healed, or cured. The medical condition could be a disease, mental illness, genetic disorder, or simply a condition a person considers socially undesirable, such as baldness or lack of breast tissue.

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