VS.

Crowd vs. Gathering

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Crowdverb

(intransitive) To press forward; to advance by pushing.

‘The man crowded into the packed room.’;

Gatheringnoun

A meeting or get-together; a party or social function.

‘I met her at a gathering of engineers and scientists.’;

Crowdverb

(intransitive) To press together or collect in numbers

‘They crowded through the archway and into the park.’;

Gatheringnoun

A group of people or things.

‘A gathering of fruit.’;

Crowdverb

(transitive) To press or drive together, especially into a small space; to cram.

‘He tried to crowd too many cows into the cow-pen.’;

Gatheringnoun

(bookbinding) A section, a group of bifolios, or sheets of paper, stacked together and folded in half.

‘This gathering machine forms the backbone of a bookbinding operation.’;

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Crowdverb

(transitive) To fill by pressing or thronging together

Gatheringnoun

A charitable contribution; a collection.

Crowdverb

To push, to press, to shove.

‘They tried to crowd her off the sidewalk.’;

Gatheringnoun

(medicine) A tumor or boil suppurated or maturated; an abscess.

Crowdverb

(nautical) To approach another ship too closely when it has right of way.

Gatheringverb

present participle of gather

‘She enjoyed gathering wildflowers.’;

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Crowdverb

To carry excessive sail in the hope of moving faster.

Gatheringnoun

The act of collecting or bringing together.

Crowdverb

(transitive) To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.

Gatheringnoun

That which is gathered, collected, or brought together

Crowdverb

To play on a crowd; to fiddle.

Gatheringadjective

Assembling; collecting; used for gathering or concentrating.

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Crowdnoun

A group of people congregated or collected into a close body without order.

‘After the movie let out, a crowd of people pushed through the exit doors.’;

Gatheringnoun

a group of persons together in one place

Crowdnoun

Several things collected or closely pressed together; also, some things adjacent to each other.

‘There was a crowd of toys pushed beneath the couch where the children were playing.’;

Gatheringnoun

the social act of assembling;

‘they demanded the right of assembly’;

Crowdnoun

(with definite article) The so-called lower orders of people; the populace, vulgar.

Gatheringnoun

the act of gathering something

Crowdnoun

A group of people united or at least characterised by a common interest.

‘That obscure author's fans were a nerdy crowd which hardly ever interacted before the Internet age.’;

Gatheringnoun

sewing consisting of small folds or puckers made by pulling tight a thread in a line of stitching

Crowdnoun

(obsolete) lang=en

Gatheringadjective

accumulating and becoming more intense;

‘the deepening gloom’; ‘felt a deepening love’; ‘the gathering darkness’; ‘the thickening dusk’;

Crowdnoun

A fiddle.

Gatheringnoun

an assembly or meeting, especially one held for a specific purpose

‘a family gathering’;

Crowdverb

To push, to press, to shove.

Gatheringnoun

a group of leaves taken together, one inside another, in binding a book.

Crowdverb

To press or drive together; to mass together.

Crowdverb

To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity.

‘The balconies and verandas were crowded with spectators, anxious to behold their future sovereign.’;

Crowdverb

To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.

Crowdverb

To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng.

‘The whole company crowded about the fire.’; ‘Images came crowding on his mind faster than he could put them into words.’;

Crowdverb

To urge or press forward; to force one's self; as, a man crowds into a room.

Crowdverb

To play on a crowd; to fiddle.

Crowdnoun

A number of things collected or closely pressed together; also, a number of things adjacent to each other.

‘A crowd of islands.’;

Crowdnoun

A number of persons congregated or collected into a close body without order; a throng.

‘The crowd of Vanity Fair.’; ‘Crowds that stream from yawning doors.’;

Crowdnoun

The lower orders of people; the populace; the vulgar; the rabble; the mob.

‘To fool the crowd with glorious lies.’; ‘He went not with the crowd to see a shrine.’;

Crowdnoun

An ancient instrument of music with six strings; a kind of violin, being the oldest known stringed instrument played with a bow.

‘A lackey that . . . can warble upon a crowd a little.’;

Crowdnoun

a large number of things or people considered together;

‘a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers’;

Crowdnoun

an informal body of friends;

‘he still hangs out with the same crowd’;

Crowdverb

cause to herd, drive, or crowd together;

‘We herded the children into a spare classroom’;

Crowdverb

fill or occupy to the point of overflowing;

‘The students crowded the auditorium’;

Crowdverb

to gather together in large numbers;

‘men in straw boaters and waxed mustaches crowded the verandah’;

Crowdverb

approach a certain age or speed;

‘She is pushing fifty’;

Crowd

Generally speaking, a crowd is defined as a group of people that have gathered for a common purpose or intent such as at a demonstration, a sports event, or during looting (this is known as an acting crowd), or may simply be made up of many people going about their business in a busy area. The term may sometimes refer to the lower orders of people in general.

‘the crowd’;

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