VS.

Crisis vs. Recession

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Crisisnoun

A crucial or decisive point or situation; a turning point.

Recessionnoun

The act or an instance of receding or withdrawing.

Crisisnoun

An unstable situation, in political, social, economic or military affairs, especially one involving an impending abrupt change.

Recessionnoun

A period of reduced economic activity

‘''Statisticians often define a recession as negative real GDP growth during two consecutive quarters.’;

Crisisnoun

A sudden change in the course of a disease, usually at which point the patient is expected to either recover or die.

Recessionnoun

The ceremonial filing out of clergy and/or choir at the end of a church service.

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Crisisnoun

(psychology) A traumatic or stressful change in a person's life.

Recessionnoun

The act of ceding something back.

Crisisnoun

(drama) A point in a drama at which a conflict reaches a peak before being resolved.

Recessionnoun

The act of receding or withdrawing, as from a place, a claim, or a demand.

‘Mercy may rejoice upon the recessions of justice.’;

Crisisnoun

The point of time when it is to be decided whether any affair or course of action must go on, or be modified or terminate; the decisive moment; the turning point.

‘This hour's the very crisis of your fate.’; ‘The very times of crisis for the fate of the country.’;

Recessionnoun

A period during which economic activity, as measured by gross domestic product, declines for at least two quarters in a row in a specific country. If the decline is severe and long, such as greater than ten percent, it may be termed a depression.

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Crisisnoun

That change in a disease which indicates whether the result is to be recovery or death; sometimes, also, a striking change of symptoms attended by an outward manifestation, as by an eruption or sweat.

‘Till some safe crisis authorize their skill.’;

Recessionnoun

A procession in which people leave a ceremony, such as at a religious service.

Crisisnoun

an unstable situation of extreme danger or difficulty;

‘they went bankrupt during the economic crisis’;

Recessionnoun

The act of ceding back; restoration; repeated cession; as, the recession of conquered territory to its former sovereign.

Crisisnoun

a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something;

‘after the crisis the patient either dies or gets better’;

Recessionnoun

the state of the economy declines; a widespread decline in the GDP and employment and trade lasting from six months to a year

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Crisisnoun

a time of intense difficulty or danger

‘the monarchy was in crisis’; ‘the current economic crisis’;

Recessionnoun

a small concavity

Crisisnoun

a time when a difficult or important decision must be made

‘the situation has reached crisis point’;

Recessionnoun

the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service

Crisisnoun

the turning point of a disease when an important change takes place, indicating either recovery or death.

Recessionnoun

the act of ceding back

Crisis

A crisis (plural: adjectival form: ) is any event or period that will lead, or may lead, to an unstable and dangerous situation affecting an individual, group, or all of society. Crises are negative changes in the human or environmental affairs, especially when they occur abruptly, with little or no warning.

‘crises’; ‘critical’;

Recessionnoun

the act of becoming more distant

Recessionnoun

a period of temporary economic decline during which trade and industrial activity are reduced, generally identified by a fall in GDP in two successive quarters

‘the country is in the depths of a recession’; ‘measures to pull the economy out of recession’;

Recessionnoun

the action of receding; motion away from an observer.

Recession

In economics, a recession is a business cycle contraction when there is a general decline in economic activity. Recessions generally occur when there is a widespread drop in spending (an adverse demand shock).

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