VS.

Credit vs. Refund

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Creditverb

(transitive) To believe; to put credence in.

‘Someone said there were over 100,000 people there, but I can't credit that.’;

Refundverb

(transitive) To return (money) to (someone); to reimburse.

‘If you find this computer for sale anywhere at a lower price, we'll refund you the difference.’;

Creditverb

To add to an account (confer debit.)

‘Credit accounts receivable with the amount of the invoice.’; ‘For the payroll period credit employees' tips to their wages paid account and debit their minimum wage payable account.’; ‘The full amount of the purchase has been credited to your account.’;

Refundverb

To supply again with funds.

‘to refund a railroad loan’;

Creditverb

(transitive) To acknowledge the contribution of.

‘I credit the town council with restoring the shopping district.’; ‘Credit the point guard with another assist.’;

Refundverb

To pour back.

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Creditverb

(transitive) To bring honour or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of.

Refundnoun

An amount of money returned.

‘If the camera is faulty, you can return it to the store where you bought it for a full refund.’;

Creditnoun

Reliance on the truth of something said or done; faith; trust.

Refundverb

To fund again or anew; to replace (a fund or loan) by a new fund; as, to refund a railroad loan.

Creditnoun

(uncountable) Recognition and respect.

‘I give you credit for owning up to your mistake.’; ‘He arrived five minutes late, but to his credit he did work an extra ten minutes at the end of his shift.’;

Refundverb

To pour back.

‘Were the humors of the eye tinctured with any color, they would refund that color upon the object.’;

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Creditnoun

(countable) Acknowledgement of a contribution, especially in the performing arts.

‘She received a singing credit in last year's operetta.’;

Refundverb

To give back; to repay; to restore.

‘A governor, that had pillaged the people, was . . . sentenced to refund what he had wrongfully taken.’;

Creditnoun

Written titles and other information about the TV program or movie shown at the beginning and/or end of the TV program or movie.

‘They kissed, and then the credits rolled.’;

Refundverb

To supply again with funds; to reimburse.

Creditnoun

A privilege of delayed payment extended to a buyer or borrower on the seller's or lender's belief that what is given will be repaid.

‘In view of your payment record, we are happy to extend further credit to you.’;

Refundnoun

money returned to a payer

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Creditnoun

The time given for payment for something sold on trust.

‘a long credit or a short credit’;

Refundnoun

the act of returning money received previously

Creditnoun

A person's credit rating or creditworthiness, as represented by their history of borrowing and repayment (or non payment).

‘What do you mean my credit is no good?’;

Refundverb

pay back;

‘Please refund me my money’;

Creditnoun

(accounting) An addition to certain accounts.

Creditnoun

(tax accounting) A reduction in taxes owed, or a refund for excess taxes paid.

‘Didn't you know that the IRS will refund any excess payroll taxes that you paid if you use the 45(B) general business credit?’;

Creditnoun

A source of value, distinction or honour.

‘That engineer is a credit to the team.’;

Creditnoun

An arbitrary unit of value, used in many token economies.

‘To repair your star cruiser will cost 100,000 credits.’; ‘Would you like to play? I put in a dollar and I've got two credits left.’;

Creditnoun

(uncountable) Recognition for having taken a course (class).

‘If you do not come to class, you will not get credit for the class, regardless of how well you do on the final.’;

Creditnoun

(countable) A course credit, a credit hour – used as measure if enough courses have been taken for graduation.

‘Dude, I just need 3 more credits to graduate – I can take socio-linguistics of Swahili if I want.’;

Creditnoun

Reliance on the truth of something said or done; belief; faith; trust; confidence.

‘When Jonathan and the people heard these words they gave no credit unto them, nor received them.’;

Creditnoun

Reputation derived from the confidence of others; esteem; honor; good name; estimation.

‘John Gilpin was a citizenOf credit and renown.’;

Creditnoun

A ground of, or title to, belief or confidence; authority derived from character or reputation.

‘The things which we properly believe, be only such as are received on the credit of divine testimony.’;

Creditnoun

That which tends to procure, or add to, reputation or esteem; an honor.

‘I published, because I was told I might please such as it was a credit to please.’;

Creditnoun

Influence derived from the good opinion, confidence, or favor of others; interest.

‘Having credit enough with his master to provide for his own interest.’;

Creditnoun

Trust given or received; expectation of future playment for property transferred, or of fulfillment or promises given; mercantile reputation entitling one to be trusted; - applied to individuals, corporations, communities, or nations; as, to buy goods on credit.

‘Credit is nothing but the expectation of money, within some limited time.’;

Creditnoun

The time given for payment for lands or goods sold on trust; as, a long credit or a short credit.

Creditnoun

The side of an account on which are entered all items reckoned as values received from the party or the category named at the head of the account; also, any one, or the sum, of these items; - the opposite of debit; as, this sum is carried to one's credit, and that to his debit; A has several credits on the books of B.

‘He touched the dead corpse of Public Credit, and it sprung upon its feet.’;

Creditverb

To confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe.

‘How shall they creditA poor unlearned virgin?’;

Creditverb

To bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of.

‘You credit the church as much by your government as you did the school formerly by your wit.’;

Creditverb

To enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond.

‘Crove, Helmholtz, and Meyer, are more than any others to be credited with the clear enunciation of this doctrine.’;

Creditnoun

approval;

‘give her recognition for trying’; ‘he was given credit for his work’; ‘give her credit for trying’; ‘the credits were given at the end of the film’;

Creditnoun

money available for a client to borrow

Creditnoun

an accounting entry acknowledging income or capital items

Creditnoun

used in the phrase `to your credit' in order to indicate an achievement deserving praise;

‘she already had several performances to her credit’;

Creditnoun

arrangement for deferred payment for goods and services

Creditnoun

recognition by a college or university that a course of studies has been successfully completed; typically measured in semester hours

Creditnoun

a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage;

‘the student's essay failed to list several important citations’; ‘the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book’; ‘the article includes mention of similar clinical cases’;

Creditnoun

an entry on a list of persons who contributed to a film or written work

Creditverb

give someone credit for something;

‘We credited her for saving our jobs’;

Creditverb

give credit for;

‘She was not properly credited in the program’;

Creditverb

accounting: enter as credit;

‘We credit your account with $100’;

Creditverb

have trust in; trust in the truth or veracity of

Credit

Credit (from Latin credit, ) is the trust which allows one party to provide money or resources to another party wherein the second party does not reimburse the first party immediately (thereby generating a debt), but promises either to repay or return those resources (or other materials of equal value) at a later date. In other words, credit is a method of making reciprocity formal, legally enforceable, and extensible to a large group of unrelated people.

‘(he/she/it) believes’;

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