VS.

Crawl vs. Slither

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Crawlverb

(intransitive) To creep; to move slowly on hands and knees, or by dragging the body along the ground.

‘Clutching my wounded side, I crawled back to the trench.’;

Slitherverb

(intransitive) To move about smoothly and from side to side.

Crawlverb

(intransitive) To move forward slowly, with frequent stops.

‘The rush-hour traffic crawled around the bypass.’;

Slitherverb

(intransitive) To slide

Crawlverb

(intransitive) To act in a servile manner.

‘Don't come crawling to me with your useless apologies!’;

Slitheradjective

(archaic) slithery; slippery

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Crawlverb

See crawl with.

Slithernoun

A limestone rubble.

Crawlverb

(intransitive) To feel a swarming sensation.

‘The horrible sight made my skin crawl.’;

Slithernoun

(Used mistakenly) A sliver.

Crawlverb

(intransitive) To swim using the crawl stroke.

‘I think I'll crawl the next hundred metres.’;

Slitherverb

To slide; to glide.

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Crawlverb

(transitive) To move over an area on hands and knees.

‘The baby crawled the entire second floor.’;

Slitherverb

to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly;

‘They slid through the wicket in the big gate’;

Crawlverb

(intransitive) To visit while becoming inebriated.

‘They crawled the downtown bars.’;

Crawlverb

(transitive) To visit files or web sites in order to index them for searching.

‘Yahoo Search has updated its Slurp Crawler to crawl web sites faster and more efficiently.’;

Crawlnoun

The act of moving slowly on hands and knees etc, or with frequent stops.

Crawlnoun

A rapid swimming stroke with alternate overarm strokes and a fluttering kick.

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Crawlnoun

(figurative) A very slow pace.

‘My computer has slowed down to a crawl since I installed that software package.’;

Crawlnoun

A piece of horizontally scrolling text overlaid on the main image.

Crawlnoun

A pen or enclosure of stakes and hurdles for holding fish.

Crawlverb

To move slowly by drawing the body along the ground, as a worm; to move slowly on hands and knees; to creep.

‘A worm finds what it searches after only by feeling, as it crawls from one thing to another.’;

Crawlverb

to move or advance in a feeble, slow, or timorous manner.

‘He was hardly able to crawl about the room.’; ‘The meanest thing that crawl'd beneath my eyes.’;

Crawlverb

To advance slowly and furtively; to insinuate one's self; to advance or gain influence by servile or obsequious conduct.

‘Secretly crawling up the battered walls.’; ‘Hath crawled into the favor of the king.’; ‘Absurd opinions crawl about the world.’;

Crawlverb

To have a sensation as of insect creeping over the body; as, the flesh crawls. See Creep, v. i., 7.

Crawlnoun

The act or motion of crawling; slow motion, as of a creeping animal.

Crawlnoun

A pen or inclosure of stakes and hurdles on the seacoast, for holding fish.

Crawlnoun

a very slow movement;

‘the traffic advanced at a crawl’;

Crawlnoun

a swimming stroke; arms are moved alternately overhead accompanied by a flutter kick

Crawlnoun

a slow creeping mode of locomotion (on hands and knees or dragging the body);

‘a crawl was all that the injured man could manage’; ‘the traffic moved at a creep’;

Crawlverb

move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground;

‘The crocodile was crawling along the riverbed’;

Crawlverb

feel as if crawling with insects;

‘My skin crawled--I was terrified’;

Crawlverb

be crawling with;

‘The old cheese was crawling with maggots’;

Crawlverb

show submission or fear

Crawlverb

swim by doing the crawl;

‘European children learn the breast stroke; they often don't know how to crawl’;

Crawlverb

move forward on the hands and knees or by dragging the body close to the ground

‘they crawled from under the table’;

Crawlverb

(of an insect or small animal) move slowly along a surface

‘the tiny spider was crawling up Nicky's arm’;

Crawlverb

(of a vehicle) move at an unusually slow pace

‘the traffic was crawling along’;

Crawlverb

swim using the crawl

‘I turned without stopping and crawled back to the deep end’;

Crawlverb

(of paint or other liquid) move after application to form an uneven layer over the surface below

‘glazes can crawl away from a crack in the piece’;

Crawlverb

behave obsequiously or ingratiatingly in the hope of gaining someone's favour

‘a reporter's job can involve crawling to objectionable people’;

Crawlverb

be covered or crowded with (insects or people), to an extent that is objectionable

‘the floor was dirty and crawling with bugs’;

Crawlverb

(of a program) systematically visit (a number of web pages) in order to create an index of data

‘its automated software robots crawl websites, grabbing copies of pages to index’;

Crawlnoun

an act of moving on one's hands and knees or dragging one's body along the ground

‘they began the crawl back to their own lines’;

Crawlnoun

a slow rate of movement, typically that of a vehicle

‘he reduced his speed to a crawl’;

Crawlnoun

a swimming stroke involving alternate overarm movements and rapid kicks of the legs

‘she could do the crawl and so many other strokes’;

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