VS.

Crack vs. Snap

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Crackverb

(intransitive) To form cracks.

‘It's been so dry, the ground is starting to crack.’;

Snapnoun

A quick breaking or cracking sound or the action of producing such a sound.

Crackverb

(intransitive) To break apart under pressure.

‘When I tried to stand on the chair, it cracked.’;

Snapnoun

A sudden break.

Crackverb

(intransitive) To become debilitated by psychological pressure.

‘Anyone would crack after being hounded like that.’;

Snapnoun

An attempt to seize, bite, attack, or grab.

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Crackverb

(intransitive) To break down or yield, especially under interrogation or torture.

‘When we showed him the pictures of the murder scene, he cracked.’;

Snapnoun

The act of making a snapping sound by pressing the thumb and an opposing finger of the same hand together and suddenly releasing the grip so that the finger hits against the palm.

Crackverb

(intransitive) To make a cracking sound.

‘The bat cracked with authority and the ball went for six.’;

Snapnoun

A fastening device that makes a snapping sound when used.

Crackverb

To change rapidly in register.

‘His voice cracked with emotion.’;

Snapnoun

(informal) A photograph; a snapshot.

‘We took a few snaps of the old church before moving on.’;

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Crackverb

To alternate between high and low register in the process of eventually lowering.

‘His voice finally cracked when he was fourteen.’;

Snapnoun

The sudden release of something held under pressure or tension.

Crackverb

(intransitive) To make a sharply humorous comment.

‘"I would too, with a face like that," she cracked.’;

Snapnoun

A thin circular cookie or similar baked good.

‘a ginger snap’;

Crackverb

(transitive) To make a crack or cracks in.

‘The ball cracked the window.’;

Snapnoun

A brief, sudden period of a certain weather; used primarily in the phrase cold snap.

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Crackverb

(transitive) To break open or crush to small pieces by impact or stress.

‘You'll need a hammer to crack a black walnut.’;

Snapnoun

A very short period of time (figuratively, the time taken to snap one's fingers), or a task that can be accomplished in such a period.

‘It'll be a snap to get that finished.’; ‘I can fix most vacuum cleaners in a snap.’;

Crackverb

(transitive) To strike forcefully.

‘She cracked him over the head with her handbag.’;

Snapnoun

A snap bean such as Phaseolus vulgaris.

Crackverb

(transitive) To open slightly.

‘Could you please crack the window?’;

Snapnoun

(American football) The passing of a football from the center to a back that begins play, a hike.

Crackverb

(transitive) To cause to yield under interrogation or other pressure. (Figurative)

‘They managed to crack him on the third day.’;

Snapnoun

A rivet: a scrapbooking embellishment.

Crackverb

(transitive) To solve a difficult problem. Figurative, from cracking a nut.

‘I've finally cracked it, and of course the answer is obvious in hindsight.’;

Snapnoun

A small meal, a snack; lunch.

Crackverb

(transitive) To overcome a security system or a component.

‘It took a minute to crack the lock, three minutes to crack the security system, and about twenty minutes to crack the safe.’; ‘They finally cracked the code.’;

Snapnoun

(uncountable) A card game, primarily for children, in which players cry "snap" to claim pairs of matching cards as they are turned up.

Crackverb

(transitive) To cause to make a sharp sound.

‘to crack a whip’;

Snapnoun

(obsolete) A greedy fellow.

Crackverb

(transitive) To tell (a joke).

‘The performance was fine until he cracked that dead baby joke.’;

Snapnoun

That which is, or may be, snapped up; something bitten off, seized, or obtained by a single quick movement; hence, a bite, morsel, or fragment; a scrap.

Crackverb

To break down (a complex molecule), especially with the application of heat: to pyrolyse.

‘Acetone is cracked to ketene and methane at 700°C.’;

Snapnoun

briskness; vigour; energy; decision

Crackverb

To circumvent software restrictions such as regional coding or time limits.

‘That software licence will expire tomorrow unless we can crack it.’;

Snapnoun

Any circumstance out of which money may be made or an advantage gained. used primarily in the phrase soft snap.

Crackverb

To open a canned beverage, or any packaged drink or food.

‘I'd love to crack open a beer.’; ‘Let's crack a tube and watch the game.''’;

Snapnoun

(slang) Something that is easy or effortless.

Crackverb

(obsolete) To brag, boast.

Snapnoun

A snapper, or snap beetle.

Crackverb

To be ruined or impaired; to fail.

Snapnoun

jounce (the fourth derivative of the position vector with respect to time), followed by crackle and pop

Cracknoun

A thin and usually jagged space opened in a previously solid material.

‘A large crack had formed in the roadway.’;

Snapnoun

A quick offhand shot with a firearm; a snap shot.

Cracknoun

A narrow opening.

‘We managed to squeeze through a crack in the rock wall.’; ‘Open the door a crack.’;

Snapnoun

(colloquial) Something of no value.

‘not worth a snap’;

Cracknoun

A sharply humorous comment; a wisecrack.

‘I didn't appreciate that crack about my hairstyle.’;

Snapnoun

(internet) A visual message sent through the Snapchat application.

Cracknoun

A potent, relatively cheap, addictive variety of cocaine; often a rock, usually smoked through a crack-pipe.

Snapnoun

(uncountable) A crisp or pithy quality; epigrammatic point or force.

Cracknoun

(onomatopoeia) The sharp sound made when solid material breaks.

‘The crack of the falling branch could be heard for miles.’;

Snapnoun

A tool used by riveters.

Cracknoun

(onomatopoeia) Any sharp sound.

‘The crack of the bat hitting the ball.’;

Snapnoun

A tool used by glass-moulders.

Cracknoun

(informal) An attempt at something.

‘I'd like to take a crack at that game.’;

Snapnoun

A brief theatrical engagement.

Cracknoun

Vagina.

‘I'm so horny even the crack of dawn isn't safe!’;

Snapnoun

An easy and profitable place or task; a sinecure.

Cracknoun

(informal) The space between the buttocks.

‘Pull up your pants! Your crack is showing.’;

Snapnoun

A cheat or sharper.

Cracknoun

Conviviality; fun; good conversation, chat, gossip, or humorous storytelling; good company.

‘The crack was good.’; ‘That was good crack.’; ‘He/she is quare good crack.’; ‘The party was great crack.’;

Snapverb

To fracture or break apart suddenly.

‘He snapped his stick in anger.’; ‘If you bend it too much, it will snap.’;

Cracknoun

Business; events; news.

‘What's the crack?’; ‘What's this crack about a possible merger.’;

Snapverb

(intransitive) To give forth or produce a sharp cracking noise; to crack.

‘Blazing firewood snaps.’;

Cracknoun

(computing) A program or procedure designed to circumvent restrictions or usage limits on software.

‘Has anyone got a crack for DocumentWriter 3.0?’;

Snapverb

(intransitive) To attempt to seize with the teeth or bite.

‘A dog snaps at a passenger. A fish snaps at the bait.’;

Cracknoun

a meaningful chat.

Snapverb

(intransitive) To attempt to seize with eagerness.

‘She snapped at the chance to appear on television.’;

Cracknoun

(Internet slang) Extremely silly, absurd or off-the-wall ideas or prose.

Snapverb

(intransitive) To speak abruptly or sharply.

‘He snapped at me for the slightest mistake.’;

Cracknoun

The tone of voice when changed at puberty.

Snapverb

(intransitive) To give way abruptly and loudly.

Cracknoun

(archaic) A mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity.

‘He has a crack.’;

Snapverb

(intransitive) To suffer a mental breakdown, usually while under tension.

‘She should take a break before she snaps.’;

Cracknoun

(archaic) A crazy or crack-brained person.

Snapverb

(intransitive) To flash or appear to flash as with light.

Cracknoun

(obsolete) A boast; boasting.

Snapverb

(intransitive) To fit or fasten together with a snapping sound.

Cracknoun

(obsolete) Breach of chastity.

Snapverb

To jump to a fixed position relative to another element.

‘The floating toolbar will snap to the edge of the screen when dragged towards it.’;

Cracknoun

(obsolete) A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.

Snapverb

(transitive) To snatch with or as if with the teeth.

Cracknoun

A brief time; an instant; a jiffy.

‘I'll be with you in a crack.’;

Snapverb

(transitive) To pull apart with a snapping sound; to pop loose.

Crackadjective

Highly trained and competent.

‘Even a crack team of investigators would have trouble solving this case.’;

Snapverb

(transitive) To say abruptly or sharply.

Crackadjective

Excellent, first-rate, superior, top-notch.

‘She's a crack shot with that rifle.’;

Snapverb

To speak to abruptly or sharply; to treat snappishly; usually with up.

Crackverb

To break or burst, with or without entire separation of the parts; as, to crack glass; to crack nuts.

Snapverb

(transitive) To cause something to emit a snapping sound.

‘to snap a fastener’; ‘to snap a whip’;

Crackverb

To rend with grief or pain; to affect deeply with sorrow; hence, to disorder; to distract; to craze.

‘O, madam, my old heart is cracked.’; ‘He thought none poets till their brains were cracked.’;

Snapverb

(transitive) To close something using a snap as a fastener.

Crackverb

To cause to sound suddenly and sharply; to snap; as, to crack a whip.

Snapverb

(transitive) A video of a person snapping their fingers.Alternative snapping techniqueTo snap one's fingers: to make a snapping sound, often by pressing the thumb and an opposing finger of the same hand together and suddenly releasing the grip so that the finger hits against the palm; alternatively, by bringing the index finger quickly down onto the middle finger and thumb.

Crackverb

To utter smartly and sententiously; as, to crack a joke.

Snapverb

(transitive) To cause to move suddenly and smartly.

Crackverb

To cry up; to extol; - followed by up.

Snapverb

(transitive) To take a photograph; to release a camera's shutter (which may make a snapping sound).

‘He snapped a picture of me with my mouth open and my eyes closed.’;

Crackverb

To burst or open in chinks; to break, with or without quite separating into parts.

‘By misfortune it cracked in the coling.’; ‘The mirror cracked from side to side.’;

Snapverb

To put the ball in play by passing it from the center to a back; to hike the ball.

‘He can snap the ball to a back twenty yards behind him.’;

Crackverb

To be ruined or impaired; to fail.

‘The credit . . . of exchequers cracks, when little comes in and much goes out.’;

Snapverb

To misfire.

‘The gun snapped.’;

Crackverb

To utter a loud or sharp, sudden sound.

‘As thunder when the clouds in autumn crack.’;

Snapverb

To catch out sharply (a batsman who has just snicked a bowled ball).

Crackverb

To utter vain, pompous words; to brag; to boast; - with of.

‘Ethoipes of their sweet complexion crack.’;

Snapinterjection

The winning cry at a game of snap.

Cracknoun

A partial separation of parts, with or without a perceptible opening; a chink or fissure; a narrow breach; a crevice; as, a crack in timber, or in a wall, or in glass.

Snapinterjection

(British) By extension from the card game, "I've got one the same." or similar

‘Snap! We've both got pink buckets and spades.’;

Cracknoun

Rupture; flaw; breach, in a moral sense.

‘My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.’;

Snapinterjection

(British) Ritual utterance of agreement (after the cry in the card game snap).

Cracknoun

A sharp, sudden sound or report; the sound of anything suddenly burst or broken; as, the crack of a falling house; the crack of thunder; the crack of a whip.

‘Will the stretch out to the crack of doom?’;

Snapinterjection

(North America) Used in place of expletive to express surprise, usually in response to a negative statement or news; often used facetiously.

‘"I just ran over your phone with my car." "Oh, snap!"’;

Cracknoun

The tone of voice when changed at puberty.

‘Though now our voicesHave got the mannish crack.’;

Snapinterjection

Ritual utterance used after something is said by two people at exactly the same time.

‘"Wasn't that John?" "Wasn't that John?" "Snap!"’;

Cracknoun

Mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity; as, he has a crack.

Snapadjective

(informal) Done, performed, made, etc. quickly and without deliberation.

‘a snap judgment or decision; a snap political convention’;

Cracknoun

A crazy or crack-brained person.

‘I . . . can not get the Parliament to listen to me, who look upon me as a crack and a projector.’;

Snapverb

To break at once; to break short, as substances that are brittle.

‘Breaks the doors open, snaps the locks.’;

Cracknoun

A boast; boasting.

Snapverb

To strike, to hit, or to shut, with a sharp sound.

Cracknoun

Breach of chastity.

Snapverb

To bite or seize suddenly, especially with the teeth.

‘He, by playing too often at the mouth of death, has been snapped by it at last.’;

Cracknoun

A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.

‘Val. 'T is a noble child. Vir. A crack, madam.’;

Snapverb

To break upon suddenly with sharp, angry words; to treat snappishly; - usually with up.

Cracknoun

A brief time; an instant; as, to be with one in a crack.

Snapverb

To crack; to cause to make a sharp, cracking noise; as, to snap a whip.

‘MacMorian snapped his fingers repeatedly.’;

Cracknoun

Free conversation; friendly chat.

‘What is crack in English? . . . A crack is . . . a chat with a good, kindly human heart in it.’;

Snapverb

To project with a snap.

Cracknoun

a witty remark; a wisecrack.

Snapverb

To catch out sharply (a batsman who has just snicked a bowled ball).

Cracknoun

a chance or opportunity to do something; an attempt; as, I'll take a crack at it.

Snapverb

To break short, or at once; to part asunder suddenly; as, a mast snaps; a needle snaps.

‘But this weapon will snap short, unfaithful to the hand that employs it.’;

Cracknoun

a form of cocaine, highly purified and prepared as small pellets, especially suitable for smoking; - also called rock. Used in this form it appears to be more addicting than cocaine powder.

Snapverb

To give forth, or produce, a sharp, cracking noise; to crack; as, blazing firewood snaps.

Crackadjective

Of superior excellence; having qualities to be boasted of; as, a crack shot.

‘One of our crack speakers in the Commons.’;

Snapverb

To make an effort to bite; to aim to seize with the teeth; to catch eagerly (at anything); - often with at; as, a dog snapsat a passenger; a fish snaps at the bait.

Cracknoun

a long narrow opening

Snapverb

To utter sharp, harsh, angry words; - often with at; as, to snap at a child.

Cracknoun

a narrow opening;

‘he opened the window a crack’;

Snapverb

To miss fire; as, the gun snapped.

Cracknoun

a long narrow depression in a surface

Snapverb

Of the eyes, to emit sudden, brief sparkles like those of a snapping fire, as sometimes in anger.

Cracknoun

a sudden sharp noise;

‘the crack of a whip’; ‘he heard the cracking of the ice’; ‘he can hear the snap of a twig’;

Snapnoun

A sudden breaking or rupture of any substance.

Cracknoun

a chance to do something;

‘he wanted a shot at the champion’;

Snapnoun

A sudden, eager bite; a sudden seizing, or effort to seize, as with the teeth.

Cracknoun

witty remark

Snapnoun

A sudden, sharp motion or blow, as with the finger sprung from the thumb, or the thumb from the finger.

Cracknoun

a blemish resulting from a break without complete separation of the parts;

‘there was a crack in the mirror’;

Snapnoun

A sharp, abrupt sound, as that made by the crack of a whip; as, the snap of the trigger of a gun.

Cracknoun

a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted

Snapnoun

A greedy fellow.

Cracknoun

a usually brief attempt;

‘he took a crack at it’; ‘I gave it a whirl’;

Snapnoun

That which is, or may be, snapped up; something bitten off, seized, or obtained by a single quick movement; hence, a bite, morsel, or fragment; a scrap.

‘He's a nimble fellow,And alike skilled in every liberal science,As having certain snaps of all.’;

Cracknoun

the act of cracking something

Snapnoun

A sudden severe interval or spell; - applied to the weather; as, a cold snap.

Crackverb

become fractured; break or crack on the surface only;

‘The glass cracked when it was heated’;

Snapnoun

A small catch or fastening held or closed by means of a spring, or one which closes with a snapping sound, as the catch of a bracelet, necklace, clasp of a book, etc.

Crackverb

make a very sharp explosive sound;

‘His gun cracked’;

Snapnoun

A snap beetle.

Crackverb

make a sharp sound;

‘his fingers snapped’;

Snapnoun

A thin, crisp cake, usually small, and flavored with ginger; - used chiefly in the plural.

Crackverb

hit forcefully; deal a hard blow, making a cracking noise;

‘The teacher cracked him across the face with a ruler’;

Snapnoun

Briskness; vigor; energy; decision.

Crackverb

pass through (a barrier);

‘Registrations cracked through the 30,000 mark in the county’;

Snapnoun

Any circumstance out of which money may be made or an advantage gained.

Crackverb

break partially but keep its integrity;

‘The glass cracked’;

Snapnoun

Any task, labor, set of circumstances, or the like, that yields satisfactory results or gives pleasure with little trouble or effort, as an easy course of study, a job where work is light, a bargain, etc.

Crackverb

break suddenly and abruptly, as under tension;

‘The rope snapped’;

Snapnoun

A snap shot with a firearm.

Crackverb

suffer a nervous breakdown

Snapnoun

A snapshot.

Crackverb

tell spontaneously;

‘crack a joke’;

Snapnoun

Something of no value; as, not worth a snap.

Crackverb

cause to become cracked;

‘heat and light cracked the back of the leather chair’;

Snapnoun

The action of snapping the ball back, from the center usu. to the quarterback, which commences the play (down), and, if the clock had stopped, restarts the timer clock; a snap back.

Crackverb

reduce (petroleum) to a simpler compound by cracking

Snapadjective

Done, performed, made, executed, carried through, or the like, quickly and without deliberation; as, a snap judgment or decision; a snap political convention.

Crackverb

break into simpler molecules by means of heat;

‘The petroleum cracked’;

Snapnoun

the act of catching an object with the hands;

‘Mays made the catch with his back to the plate’; ‘he made a grab for the ball before it landed’; ‘Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away’; ‘the infielder's snap and throw was a single motion’;

Crackadjective

of the highest quality;

‘an ace reporter’; ‘a crack shot’; ‘a first-rate golfer’; ‘a super party’; ‘played top-notch tennis’; ‘an athlete in tiptop condition’; ‘she is absolutely tops’;

Snapnoun

a spell of cold weather;

‘a cold snap in the middle of May’;

Snapnoun

tender green beans without strings that easily snap into sections

Snapnoun

a crisp round cookie flavored with ginger

Snapnoun

the noise produced by the rapid movement of a finger from the tip to the base of the thumb on the same hand;

‘servants appeared at the snap of his fingers’;

Snapnoun

a sudden sharp noise;

‘the crack of a whip’; ‘he heard the cracking of the ice’; ‘he can hear the snap of a twig’;

Snapnoun

a sudden breaking

Snapnoun

the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed;

‘the waistband had lost its snap’;

Snapnoun

an informal photograph; usually made with a small hand-held camera;

‘my snapshots haven't been developed yet’; ‘he tried to get unposed shots of his friends’;

Snapnoun

a fastener used on clothing; fastens with a snapping sound;

‘children can manage snaps better than buttons’;

Snapnoun

any undertaking that is easy to do;

‘marketing this product will be no picnic’;

Snapnoun

the act of snapping the fingers; movement of a finger from the tip to the base of the thumb on the same hand;

‘he gave his fingers a snap’;

Snapnoun

(American football) putting the ball in play by passing it (between the legs) to a back;

‘the quarterback fumbled the snap’;

Snapverb

utter in an angry, sharp, or abrupt tone;

‘The sales clerky snapped a reply at the angry customer’; ‘The guard snarled at us’;

Snapverb

separate or cause to separate abruptly;

‘The rope snapped’; ‘tear the paper’;

Snapverb

break suddenly and abruptly, as under tension;

‘The rope snapped’;

Snapverb

move or strike with a noise;

‘he clicked on the light’; ‘his arm was snapped forward’;

Snapverb

snap close with a sound;

‘The lock snapped shut’;

Snapverb

make a sharp sound;

‘his fingers snapped’;

Snapverb

move with a snapping sound;

‘bullets snapped past us’;

Snapverb

to grasp hastily or eagerly;

‘Before I could stop him the dog snatched the ham bone’;

Snapverb

put in play with a snap;

‘snap a football’;

Snapverb

cause to make a snapping sound;

‘snap your fingers’;

Snapverb

lose control of one's emotions;

‘When she heard that she had not passed the exam, she lost it completely’; ‘When her baby died, she snapped’;

Snapverb

record on photographic film;

‘I photographed the scene of the accident’; ‘She snapped a picture of the President’;

Snapverb

break suddenly and completely, typically with a sharp cracking sound

‘guitar strings kept snapping’; ‘dead twigs can be snapped off’;

Snapverb

emit a sudden, sharp cracking sound

‘banners snapping in the breeze’;

Snapverb

move or alter with a brisk movement and typically a sharp sound

‘his mouth snapped into a tight, straight line’; ‘Rosa snapped her bag shut’;

Snapverb

(of an animal) make a sudden audible bite

‘a dog was snapping at his heels’;

Snapverb

suddenly lose one's self-control

‘she claims she snapped after years of violence’;

Snapverb

say something quickly and irritably

‘‘I really don't much care,’ she snapped’; ‘McIllvanney snapped at her’;

Snapverb

take a snapshot of

‘photographers were snapping away at her’; ‘he planned to spend the time snapping rare wildlife’;

Snapverb

put (the ball) into play by a quick backward movement

‘time will not be resumed until the ball is snapped on the next play’;

Snapnoun

a sudden, sharp cracking sound or movement

‘she closed her purse with a snap’;

Snapnoun

vigour or liveliness of style or action; zest

‘the snap of the dialogue’;

Snapnoun

a hurried, irritable tone or manner

‘‘I'm still waiting,’ he said with a snap’;

Snapnoun

a snapshot

‘holiday snaps’;

Snapnoun

a card game in which cards from two piles are turned over simultaneously and players call ‘snap’ as quickly as possible when two similar cards are exposed.

Snapnoun

said when similar objects turn up or two similar events take place

‘‘Snap!’ They looked at each other's ties with a smile’;

Snapnoun

a sudden brief spell of cold or otherwise distinctive weather

‘a cold snap’;

Snapnoun

food, especially food taken to work to be eaten during a break.

Snapnoun

an easy task

‘a control panel that makes operation a snap’;

Snapnoun

a quick backward movement of the ball from the ground that begins a play.

Snapnoun

a small fastener on clothing, engaged by pressing its two halves together; a press stud

‘a black cloth jacket with a lot of snaps and attachments’;

Snapadjective

done or taken on the spur of the moment, unexpectedly, or without notice

‘he could call a snap election’; ‘a snap decision’;

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