VS.

Crack vs. Hack

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Crackverb

(intransitive) To form cracks.

‘It's been so dry, the ground is starting to crack.’;

Hackverb

(transitive) To chop or cut down in a rough manner.

‘They hacked the brush down and made their way through the jungle.’;

Crackverb

(intransitive) To break apart under pressure.

‘When I tried to stand on the chair, it cracked.’;

Hackverb

(intransitive) To cough noisily.

‘This cold is awful. I can't stop hacking.’;

Crackverb

(intransitive) To become debilitated by psychological pressure.

‘Anyone would crack after being hounded like that.’;

Hackverb

To withstand or put up with a difficult situation.

‘Can you hack it out here with no electricity or running water?’;

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Crackverb

(intransitive) To break down or yield, especially under interrogation or torture.

‘When we showed him the pictures of the murder scene, he cracked.’;

Hackverb

(computing) To make a quick code change to patch a computer program, often one that, while being effective, is inelegant or makes the program harder to maintain.

‘I hacked in a fix for this bug, but we'll still have to do a real fix later.’;

Crackverb

(intransitive) To make a cracking sound.

‘The bat cracked with authority and the ball went for six.’;

Hackverb

(computing) To accomplish a difficult programming task.

‘He can hack like no one else and make the program work as expected.’;

Crackverb

To change rapidly in register.

‘His voice cracked with emotion.’;

Hackverb

To work with something on an intimately technical level.

‘I'm currently hacking distributed garbage collection.’;

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Crackverb

To alternate between high and low register in the process of eventually lowering.

‘His voice finally cracked when he was fourteen.’;

Hackverb

To apply a trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method to something to increase productivity, efficiency or ease.

‘I read up on dating tips so I can hack my sex life.’;

Crackverb

(intransitive) To make a sharply humorous comment.

‘"I would too, with a face like that," she cracked.’;

Hackverb

To hack into; to gain unauthorized access to (a computer system, e.g., a website, or network) by manipulating code; to crack.

Crackverb

(transitive) To make a crack or cracks in.

‘The ball cracked the window.’;

Hackverb

By extension, to gain unauthorised access to a computer or online account belonging to (a person or organisation).

‘When I logged into the social network, I discovered I'd been hacked.’;

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Crackverb

(transitive) To break open or crush to small pieces by impact or stress.

‘You'll need a hammer to crack a black walnut.’;

Hackverb

(ice hockey) To strike an opponent's leg with one's hockey stick.

‘He's going to the penalty box after hacking the defender in front of the goal.’;

Crackverb

(transitive) To strike forcefully.

‘She cracked him over the head with her handbag.’;

Hackverb

(ice hockey) To make a flailing attempt to hit the puck with a hockey stick.

‘There's a scramble in front of the net as the forwards are hacking at the bouncing puck.’;

Crackverb

(transitive) To open slightly.

‘Could you please crack the window?’;

Hackverb

(baseball) To swing at a pitched ball.

‘He went to the batter's box hacking.’;

Crackverb

(transitive) To cause to yield under interrogation or other pressure. (Figurative)

‘They managed to crack him on the third day.’;

Hackverb

(soccer and rugby) To kick (a player) on the shins.

Crackverb

(transitive) To solve a difficult problem. Figurative, from cracking a nut.

‘I've finally cracked it, and of course the answer is obvious in hindsight.’;

Hackverb

To strike in a frantic movement.

Crackverb

(transitive) To overcome a security system or a component.

‘It took a minute to crack the lock, three minutes to crack the security system, and about twenty minutes to crack the safe.’; ‘They finally cracked the code.’;

Hackverb

(transitive) To strike lightly as part of tapotement massage.

Crackverb

(transitive) To cause to make a sharp sound.

‘to crack a whip’;

Hackverb

To lay (bricks) on a rack to dry.

Crackverb

(transitive) To tell (a joke).

‘The performance was fine until he cracked that dead baby joke.’;

Hackverb

(falconry) To keep (young hawks) in a state of partial freedom, before they are trained.

Crackverb

To break down (a complex molecule), especially with the application of heat: to pyrolyse.

‘Acetone is cracked to ketene and methane at 700°C.’;

Hackverb

(dated) To make common or cliched; to vulgarise.

Crackverb

To circumvent software restrictions such as regional coding or time limits.

‘That software licence will expire tomorrow unless we can crack it.’;

Hackverb

To ride a horse at a regular pace; to ride on a road (as opposed to riding cross-country etc.).

Crackverb

To open a canned beverage, or any packaged drink or food.

‘I'd love to crack open a beer.’; ‘Let's crack a tube and watch the game.''’;

Hackverb

(obsolete) To be exposed or offered or to common use for hire; to turn prostitute.

Crackverb

(obsolete) To brag, boast.

Hackverb

(obsolete) To live the life of a drudge or hack.

Crackverb

To be ruined or impaired; to fail.

Hackverb

To use as a hack; to let out for hire.

Cracknoun

A thin and usually jagged space opened in a previously solid material.

‘A large crack had formed in the roadway.’;

Hackverb

To use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render trite and commonplace.

Cracknoun

A narrow opening.

‘We managed to squeeze through a crack in the rock wall.’; ‘Open the door a crack.’;

Hackverb

To play hackeysack.

Cracknoun

A sharply humorous comment; a wisecrack.

‘I didn't appreciate that crack about my hairstyle.’;

Hacknoun

A tool for chopping.

Cracknoun

A potent, relatively cheap, addictive variety of cocaine; often a rock, usually smoked through a crack-pipe.

Hacknoun

A hacking blow.

Cracknoun

(onomatopoeia) The sharp sound made when solid material breaks.

‘The crack of the falling branch could be heard for miles.’;

Hacknoun

A gouge or notch made by such a blow.

Cracknoun

(onomatopoeia) Any sharp sound.

‘The crack of the bat hitting the ball.’;

Hacknoun

A dry cough.

Cracknoun

(informal) An attempt at something.

‘I'd like to take a crack at that game.’;

Hacknoun

A hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough.

Cracknoun

Vagina.

‘I'm so horny even the crack of dawn isn't safe!’;

Hacknoun

(figuratively) A try, an attempt.

Cracknoun

(informal) The space between the buttocks.

‘Pull up your pants! Your crack is showing.’;

Hacknoun

(curling) The foothold traditionally cut into the ice from which the person who throws the rock pushes off for delivery.

Cracknoun

Conviviality; fun; good conversation, chat, gossip, or humorous storytelling; good company.

‘The crack was good.’; ‘That was good crack.’; ‘He/she is quare good crack.’; ‘The party was great crack.’;

Hacknoun

(obsolete) A mattock or a miner's pickaxe.

Cracknoun

Business; events; news.

‘What's the crack?’; ‘What's this crack about a possible merger.’;

Hacknoun

(computing) An expedient, temporary solution, such as a small patch or change to code, meant to be replaced with a more elegant solution at a later date.

Cracknoun

(computing) A program or procedure designed to circumvent restrictions or usage limits on software.

‘Has anyone got a crack for DocumentWriter 3.0?’;

Hacknoun

(computing) An interesting technical achievement, particularly in computer programming.

Cracknoun

a meaningful chat.

Hacknoun

(colloquial) A trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method to increase productivity, efficiency or ease.

‘Putting your phone in a sandwich bag when you go to the beach is such a great hack.’;

Cracknoun

(Internet slang) Extremely silly, absurd or off-the-wall ideas or prose.

Hacknoun

An illegal attempt to gain access to a computer network.

Cracknoun

The tone of voice when changed at puberty.

Hacknoun

A video game or any computer software that has been altered from its original state.

Cracknoun

(archaic) A mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity.

‘He has a crack.’;

Hacknoun

Time check.

Cracknoun

(archaic) A crazy or crack-brained person.

Hacknoun

(baseball) A swing of the bat at a pitched ball by the batter.

‘He took a few hacks, but the pitcher finally struck him out.’;

Cracknoun

(obsolete) A boast; boasting.

Hacknoun

A kick on the shins in football.

Cracknoun

(obsolete) Breach of chastity.

Hacknoun

confinement of an officer to their stateroom as a punishment

Cracknoun

(obsolete) A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.

Hacknoun

(falconry) A board which the falcon's food is placed on; used by extension for the state of partial freedom in which they are kept before being trained.

Cracknoun

A brief time; an instant; a jiffy.

‘I'll be with you in a crack.’;

Hacknoun

A food-rack for cattle.

Crackadjective

Highly trained and competent.

‘Even a crack team of investigators would have trouble solving this case.’;

Hacknoun

A rack used to dry something, such as bricks, fish, or cheese.

Crackadjective

Excellent, first-rate, superior, top-notch.

‘She's a crack shot with that rifle.’;

Hacknoun

A grating in a mill race.

Crackverb

To break or burst, with or without entire separation of the parts; as, to crack glass; to crack nuts.

Hacknoun

A horse for hire, especially one which is old and tired.

Crackverb

To rend with grief or pain; to affect deeply with sorrow; hence, to disorder; to distract; to craze.

‘O, madam, my old heart is cracked.’; ‘He thought none poets till their brains were cracked.’;

Hacknoun

A person, often a journalist, hired to do routine work.

‘I got by on hack work for years before I finally published my novel.’;

Crackverb

To cause to sound suddenly and sharply; to snap; as, to crack a whip.

Hacknoun

(pejorative) Someone who is available for hire; hireling, mercenary.

Crackverb

To utter smartly and sententiously; as, to crack a joke.

Hacknoun

(slang) A taxicab (hackney cab) driver.

Crackverb

To cry up; to extol; - followed by up.

Hacknoun

A vehicle let for hire; originally, a hackney coach, now typically a taxicab.

Crackverb

To burst or open in chinks; to break, with or without quite separating into parts.

‘By misfortune it cracked in the coling.’; ‘The mirror cracked from side to side.’;

Hacknoun

A hearse.

Crackverb

To be ruined or impaired; to fail.

‘The credit . . . of exchequers cracks, when little comes in and much goes out.’;

Hacknoun

An untalented writer.

‘Dason is nothing but a two-bit hack.’; ‘He's nothing but the typical hack writer.’;

Crackverb

To utter a loud or sharp, sudden sound.

‘As thunder when the clouds in autumn crack.’;

Hacknoun

(pejorative) One who is professionally successful despite producing mediocre work. (Usually applied to persons in a creative field.)

Crackverb

To utter vain, pompous words; to brag; to boast; - with of.

‘Ethoipes of their sweet complexion crack.’;

Hacknoun

(pejorative) A talented writer-for-hire, paid to put others' thoughts into felicitous language.

Cracknoun

A partial separation of parts, with or without a perceptible opening; a chink or fissure; a narrow breach; a crevice; as, a crack in timber, or in a wall, or in glass.

Hacknoun

(politics) A political agitator. (slightly derogatory)

Cracknoun

Rupture; flaw; breach, in a moral sense.

‘My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.’;

Hacknoun

(obsolete) A writer who hires himself out for any sort of literary work; an overworked man; a drudge.

Cracknoun

A sharp, sudden sound or report; the sound of anything suddenly burst or broken; as, the crack of a falling house; the crack of thunder; the crack of a whip.

‘Will the stretch out to the crack of doom?’;

Hacknoun

(obsolete) A procuress.

Cracknoun

The tone of voice when changed at puberty.

‘Though now our voicesHave got the mannish crack.’;

Hacknoun

A small ball usually made of woven cotton or suede and filled with rice, sand or some other filler, for use in hackeysack.

Cracknoun

Mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity; as, he has a crack.

Hacknoun

A frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for drying bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle; a grating in a mill race, etc.

Cracknoun

A crazy or crack-brained person.

‘I . . . can not get the Parliament to listen to me, who look upon me as a crack and a projector.’;

Hacknoun

Unburned brick or tile, stacked up for drying.

Cracknoun

A boast; boasting.

Hacknoun

A notch; a cut.

Cracknoun

Breach of chastity.

Hacknoun

An implement for cutting a notch; a large pick used in breaking stone.

Cracknoun

A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.

‘Val. 'T is a noble child. Vir. A crack, madam.’;

Hacknoun

A hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough.

Cracknoun

A brief time; an instant; as, to be with one in a crack.

Hacknoun

A kick on the shins, or a cut from a kick.

Cracknoun

Free conversation; friendly chat.

‘What is crack in English? . . . A crack is . . . a chat with a good, kindly human heart in it.’;

Hacknoun

A clever computer program or routine within a program to accomplish an objective in a non-obvious fashion.

Cracknoun

a witty remark; a wisecrack.

Hacknoun

A quick and inelegant, though functional solution to a programming problem.

Cracknoun

a chance or opportunity to do something; an attempt; as, I'll take a crack at it.

Hacknoun

A taxicab.

Cracknoun

a form of cocaine, highly purified and prepared as small pellets, especially suitable for smoking; - also called rock. Used in this form it appears to be more addicting than cocaine powder.

Hacknoun

A horse, hackneyed or let out for common hire; also, a horse used in all kinds of work, or a saddle horse, as distinguished from hunting and carriage horses.

Crackadjective

Of superior excellence; having qualities to be boasted of; as, a crack shot.

‘One of our crack speakers in the Commons.’;

Hacknoun

A coach or carriage let for hire; a hackney coach; formerly, a coach with two seats inside facing each other; now, usually a taxicab.

‘On horse, on foot, in hacks and gilded chariots.’;

Cracknoun

a long narrow opening

Hacknoun

The driver of a hack; a taxi driver; a hackman.

Cracknoun

a narrow opening;

‘he opened the window a crack’;

Hacknoun

A bookmaker who hires himself out for any sort of literary work; an overworked man; a drudge.

‘Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed,Who long was a bookseller's hack.’;

Cracknoun

a long narrow depression in a surface

Hacknoun

A procuress.

Cracknoun

a sudden sharp noise;

‘the crack of a whip’; ‘he heard the cracking of the ice’; ‘he can hear the snap of a twig’;

Hackverb

To cut irregulary, without skill or definite purpose; to notch; to mangle by repeated strokes of a cutting instrument; as, to hack a post.

‘My sword hacked like a handsaw.’;

Cracknoun

a chance to do something;

‘he wanted a shot at the champion’;

Hackverb

Fig.: To mangle in speaking.

Cracknoun

witty remark

Hackverb

To program (a computer) for pleasure or compulsively; especially, to try to defeat the security systems and gain unauthorized access to a computer.

Cracknoun

a blemish resulting from a break without complete separation of the parts;

‘there was a crack in the mirror’;

Hackverb

To bear, physically or emotionally; as, he left the job because he couldn't hack the pressure.

Cracknoun

a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted

Hackverb

To kick the shins of (an opposing payer).

Cracknoun

a usually brief attempt;

‘he took a crack at it’; ‘I gave it a whirl’;

Hackverb

To cough faintly and frequently, or in a short, broken manner; as, a hacking cough.

Cracknoun

the act of cracking something

Hackverb

To ride or drive as one does with a hack horse; to ride at an ordinary pace, or over the roads, as distinguished from riding across country or in military fashion.

Crackverb

become fractured; break or crack on the surface only;

‘The glass cracked when it was heated’;

Hackverb

To use as a hack; to let out for hire.

Crackverb

make a very sharp explosive sound;

‘His gun cracked’;

Hackverb

To use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render trite and commonplace.

‘The word "remarkable" has been so hacked of late.’;

Crackverb

make a sharp sound;

‘his fingers snapped’;

Hackverb

To be exposed or offered to common use for hire; to turn prostitute.

Crackverb

hit forcefully; deal a hard blow, making a cracking noise;

‘The teacher cracked him across the face with a ruler’;

Hackverb

To live the life of a drudge or hack.

Crackverb

pass through (a barrier);

‘Registrations cracked through the 30,000 mark in the county’;

Hackadjective

Hackneyed; hired; mercenary.

Crackverb

break partially but keep its integrity;

‘The glass cracked’;

Hacknoun

one who works hard at boring tasks

Crackverb

break suddenly and abruptly, as under tension;

‘The rope snapped’;

Hacknoun

a politician who belongs to a small clique that controls a political party for private rather than public ends

Crackverb

suffer a nervous breakdown

Hacknoun

a mediocre and disdained writer

Crackverb

tell spontaneously;

‘crack a joke’;

Hacknoun

a tool (as a hoe or pick or mattock) used for hacking the soil

Crackverb

cause to become cracked;

‘heat and light cracked the back of the leather chair’;

Hacknoun

a car driven by a person whose job is to take passengers where they want to go in exchange for money

Crackverb

reduce (petroleum) to a simpler compound by cracking

Hacknoun

an old or over-worked horse

Crackverb

break into simpler molecules by means of heat;

‘The petroleum cracked’;

Hacknoun

a horse kept for hire

Crackadjective

of the highest quality;

‘an ace reporter’; ‘a crack shot’; ‘a first-rate golfer’; ‘a super party’; ‘played top-notch tennis’; ‘an athlete in tiptop condition’; ‘she is absolutely tops’;

Hacknoun

a saddle horse used for transportation rather than sport etc.

Hackverb

cut with a hacking tool

Hackverb

informal: be able to manage or manage successfully;

‘I can't hack it anymore’; ‘she could not cut the long days in the office’;

Hackverb

cut away;

‘he hacked with way through the forest’;

Hackverb

kick on the arms

Hackverb

kick on the shins

Hackverb

fix a computer program piecemeal until it works;

‘I'm not very good at hacking but I'll give it my best’;

Hackverb

significantly cut up a manuscript

Hackverb

cough spasmodically;

‘The patient with emphysema is hacking all day’;

Hackverb

cut with rough or heavy blows

‘men hack at the coalface’; ‘I watched them hack the branches’;

Hackverb

kick wildly or roughly

‘he had to race from his line to hack the ball into the stand’;

Hackverb

gain unauthorized access to data in a system or computer

‘they hacked into the bank's computer’; ‘someone hacked his computer from another location’;

Hackverb

program quickly and roughly.

Hackverb

cough persistently

‘I was waking up in the middle of the night and coughing and hacking for hours’;

Hackverb

manage; cope

‘lots of people leave because they can't hack it’;

Hackverb

ride a horse for pleasure or exercise

‘some gentle hacking in a scenic setting’;

Hacknoun

a rough cut, blow, or stroke

‘he was sure one of us was going to take a hack at him’;

Hacknoun

(in sport) a kick or a stroke with a stick inflicted on another player.

Hacknoun

a notch cut in the ice, or a peg inserted, to steady the foot when delivering a stone in curling.

Hacknoun

a tool for rough striking or cutting, e.g. a mattock or a miner's pick.

Hacknoun

a gash or wound.

Hacknoun

an act of computer hacking

‘the challenge of the hack itself’;

Hacknoun

a piece of computer code providing a quick or inelegant solution to a particular problem

‘this hack doesn't work on machines that have a firewall’;

Hacknoun

a strategy or technique for managing one's time or activities more efficiently

‘another hack that will save time is to cover your side mirrors with a plastic bag when freezing rain is forecast’;

Hacknoun

a writer or journalist producing dull, unoriginal work

‘Sunday newspaper hacks earn their livings on such gullibilities’;

Hacknoun

a person who does dull routine work.

Hacknoun

a horse for ordinary riding.

Hacknoun

a good-quality lightweight riding horse, especially one used in the show ring.

Hacknoun

a ride on a horse.

Hacknoun

a horse let out for hire.

Hacknoun

an inferior or worn-out horse.

Hacknoun

a taxi.

Hacknoun

a board on which a hawk's meat is laid.

Hacknoun

a wooden frame for drying bricks, cheeses, etc.

Hacknoun

a pile of bricks stacked up to dry before firing.

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