VS.

Course vs. Track

Published:

Coursenoun

A sequence of events.

‘The normal course of events seems to be just one damned thing after another.’;

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along.

‘Follow the track of the ship.’; ‘Can you see any tracks in the snow?’;

Coursenoun

A normal or customary sequence.

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or animal.

‘The fox tracks were still visible in the snow.’;

Coursenoun

A programme, a chosen manner of proceeding.

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.

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Coursenoun

Any ordered process or sequence or steps.

Tracknoun

A road or other similar beaten path.

‘Follow the track for a hundred metres.’;

Coursenoun

A learning program, as in a school.

‘I need to take a French course.’;

Tracknoun

Physical course; way.

‘Astronomers predicted the track of the comet.’;

Coursenoun

A treatment plan.

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

‘The athletes ran round the track.’;

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Coursenoun

A stage of a meal.

‘We offer seafood as the first course.’;

Tracknoun

The direction and progress of someone or something; path.

Coursenoun

The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

‘We offer seafood as the first course.’;

Tracknoun

(railways) The way or rails along which a train moves.

‘They briefly closed the railway to remove debris found on the track.’;

Coursenoun

The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, such as of land.

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Coursenoun

A path that something or someone moves along.

‘His illness ran its course.’;

Tracknoun

Awareness of something, especially when arising from close monitoring.

Coursenoun

The itinerary of a race.

‘The cross-country course passes the canal.’;

Tracknoun

(automotive) The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree (also track width)

Coursenoun

A racecourse.

Tracknoun

(automotive) Short for caterpillar track.

Coursenoun

The path taken by a flow of water; a watercourse.

Tracknoun

(cricket) The pitch.

Coursenoun

(sports) The trajectory of a ball, frisbee etc.

Tracknoun

Sound stored on a record.

Coursenoun

(golf) A golf course.

Tracknoun

The physical track on a record.

Coursenoun

(nautical) The direction of movement of a vessel at any given moment.

‘The ship changed its course 15 degrees towards south.’;

Tracknoun

(music) A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence

‘My favourite track on the album is "Sunshine".’;

Coursenoun

(navigation) The intended passage of voyage, such as a boat, ship, airplane, spaceship, etc.

‘A course was plotted to traverse the ocean.’;

Tracknoun

A circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.

Coursenoun

(nautical) The lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.

‘Main course and mainsail are the same thing in a sailing ship.’;

Tracknoun

The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.

‘I'm going to try out for track next week.’;

Coursenoun

Menses.

Tracknoun

A session talk on a conference.

Coursenoun

A row or file of objects.

Trackverb

To continue observing over time.

Coursenoun

(masonry) A row of bricks or blocks.

‘On a building that size, two crews could only lay two courses in a day.’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To observe the (measured) state of a person or object over time.

‘We will track the raven population over the next six months.’;

Coursenoun

(roofing) A row of material that forms the roofing, waterproofing or flashing system.

Trackverb

(transitive) To monitor the movement of a person or object.

‘Agent Miles has been tracking the terrorist since Madrid.’;

Coursenoun

(textiles) In weft knitting, a single row of loops connecting the loops of the preceding and following rows.

Trackverb

(transitive) To match the movement or change of a person or object.

‘My height tracks my father's at my age, so I might end up as tall as him.’;

Coursenoun

(music) A string on a lute.

Trackverb

To travel so that a moving object remains in shot.

‘The camera tracked the ball even as the field of play moved back and forth, keeping the action in shot the entire time.’;

Coursenoun

(music) A pair of strings played together in some musical instruments, like the vihuela.

Trackverb

To move.

‘The hurricane tracked further west than expected.’;

Courseverb

To run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).

‘The oil coursed through the engine.’; ‘Blood pumped around the human body courses throughout all its veins and arteries.’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To follow the tracks of.

‘My uncle spent all day tracking the deer, whose hoofprints were clear in the mud.’;

Courseverb

To run through or over.

Trackverb

(transitive) To discover the location of a person or object.

‘I tracked Joe to his friend's bedroom, where he had spent the night.’;

Courseverb

To pursue by tracking or estimating the course taken by one's prey; to follow or chase after.

Trackverb

(transitive) To leave in the form of tracks.

‘In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house.’;

Courseverb

To cause to chase after or pursue game.

‘to course greyhounds after deer’;

Trackverb

To create a musical recording (a track).

‘Lil Kyle is gonna track with that DJ next week.''’;

Courseadverb

(colloquial) lang=en

Trackverb

To create music using tracker software.

Coursenoun

The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.

‘And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais.’;

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

‘The bright track of his fiery car.’;

Coursenoun

The ground or path traversed; track; way.

‘The same horse also run the round course at Newmarket.’;

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.

‘Far from track of men.’;

Coursenoun

Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.

‘A light by which the Argive squadron steersTheir silent course to Ilium's well known shore.’; ‘Westward the course of empire takes its way.’;

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; - said of birds, etc.

Coursenoun

Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race.

Tracknoun

A road; a beaten path.

‘Behold Torquatus the same track pursue.’;

Coursenoun

Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument.

‘The course of true love never did run smooth.’;

Tracknoun

Course; way; as, the track of a comet.

Coursenoun

Customary or established sequence of events; recurrence of events according to natural laws.

‘By course of nature and of law.’; ‘Day and night,Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost,Shall hold their course.’;

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

Coursenoun

Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior.

‘My lord of York commends the plot and the general course of the action.’; ‘By perseverance in the course prescribed.’; ‘You hold your course without remorse.’;

Tracknoun

The permanent way; the rails.

Coursenoun

A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, as of land.

Coursenoun

The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

‘He appointed . . . the courses of the priests’;

Trackverb

To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in the snow.

‘It was often found impossible to track the robbers to their retreats among the hills and morasses.’;

Coursenoun

That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments.

‘He [Goldsmith] wore fine clothes, gave dinners of several courses, paid court to venal beauties.’;

Trackverb

To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to tow.

Coursenoun

A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building.

Tracknoun

a line or route along which something travels or moves;

‘the hurricane demolished houses in its path’; ‘the track of an animal’; ‘the course of the river’;

Coursenoun

The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc.

Tracknoun

evidence pointing to a possible solution;

‘the police are following a promising lead’; ‘the trail led straight to the perpetrator’;

Coursenoun

The menses.

Tracknoun

a pair of parallel rails providing a runway for wheels

Courseverb

To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue.

‘We coursed him at the heels.’;

Tracknoun

a course over which races are run

Courseverb

To cause to chase after or pursue game; as, to course greyhounds after deer.

Tracknoun

a distinct selection of music from a recording or a compact disc;

‘he played the first cut on the cd’; ‘the title track of the album’;

Courseverb

To run through or over.

‘The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.’;

Tracknoun

an endless metal belt on which tracked vehicles move over the ground

Courseverb

To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.

Tracknoun

(computer science) one of the circular magnetic paths on a magnetic disk that serve as a guide for writing and reading data

Courseverb

To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins.

Tracknoun

a groove on a phonograph recording

Coursenoun

education imparted in a series of lessons or class meetings;

‘he took a course in basket weaving’; ‘flirting is not unknown in college classes’;

Tracknoun

a bar or bars of rolled steel making a track along which vehicles can roll

Coursenoun

a connected series of events or actions or developments;

‘the government took a firm course’; ‘historians can only point out those lines for which evidence is available’;

Tracknoun

any road or path affording passage especially a rough one

Coursenoun

facility consisting of a circumscribed area of land or water laid out for a sport;

‘the course had only nine holes’; ‘the course was less than a mile’;

Tracknoun

the act of participating in an athletic competition involving running on a track

Coursenoun

a mode of action;

‘if you persist in that course you will surely fail’; ‘once a nation is embarked on a course of action it becomes extremely difficult for any retraction to take place’;

Trackverb

carry on the feet and deposit;

‘track mud into the house’;

Coursenoun

a line or route along which something travels or moves;

‘the hurricane demolished houses in its path’; ‘the track of an animal’; ‘the course of the river’;

Trackverb

observe or plot the moving path of something;

‘track a missile’;

Coursenoun

general line of orientation;

‘the river takes a southern course’; ‘the northeastern trend of the coast’;

Trackverb

go after with the intent to catch;

‘The policeman chased the mugger down the alley’; ‘the dog chased the rabbit’;

Coursenoun

part of a meal served at one time;

‘she prepared a three course meal’;

Trackverb

travel across or pass over;

‘The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day’;

Coursenoun

(construction) a layer of masonry;

‘a course of bricks’;

Trackverb

make tracks upon

Courseverb

move swiftly through or over;

‘ships coursing the Atlantic’;

Courseverb

move along, of liquids;

‘Water flowed into the cave’; ‘the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi’;

Courseverb

hunt with hounds;

‘He often courses hares’;

Courseadverb

as might be expected;

‘naturally, the lawyer sent us a huge bill’;

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