VS.

Costume vs. Drag

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Costumenoun

A style of dress, including garments, accessories and hairstyle, especially as characteristic of a particular country, period or people.

‘The dancer was wearing Highland costume.’;

Dragnoun

(uncountable) Resistance of the air (or some other fluid) to something moving through it.

‘When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.’;

Costumenoun

An outfit or a disguise worn as fancy dress etc.

‘We wore gorilla costumes to the party.’;

Dragnoun

The bottom part of a sand casting mold.

Costumenoun

A set of clothes appropriate for a particular occasion or season.

‘The bride wore a grey going-away costume.’;

Dragnoun

(countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.

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Costumeverb

To dress or adorn with a costume or appropriate garb.

Dragnoun

A puff on a cigarette or joint.

Costumenoun

Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period.

Dragnoun

Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating, or disappointing; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.

‘Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag.’;

Costumenoun

Such an arrangement of accessories, as in a picture, statue, poem, or play, as is appropriate to the time, place, or other circumstances represented or described.

‘I began last night to read Walter Scott's Lay of the Last Minstrel . . . .I was extremely delighted with the poetical beauty of some parts . . . .The costume, too, is admirable.’;

Dragnoun

A type of horse-drawn carriage.

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Costumenoun

A character dress, used at fancy balls or for dramatic purposes.

Dragnoun

Street, as in 'main drag'.

Costumenoun

the attire worn in a play or at a fancy dress ball;

‘he won the prize for best costume’;

Dragnoun

(countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.

‘to run a drag’;

Costumenoun

unusual or period attire not characteristic of or appropriate to the time and place;

‘in spite of the heat he insisted on his woolen costume’;

Dragnoun

A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.

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Costumenoun

the prevalent fashion of dress (including accessories and hair style as well as garments)

Dragnoun

A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.

Costumenoun

the attire characteristic of a country or a time or a social class;

‘he wore his national costume’;

Dragnoun

A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.

‘a stone drag’;

Costumeverb

dress in a costume;

‘We dressed up for Halloween as pumpkins’;

Dragnoun

(metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.

Costumeverb

furnish with costumes; as for a film or play

Dragnoun

(masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

Costume

Costume is the distinctive style of dress or cosmetic of an individual or group that reflects class, gender, profession, ethnicity, nationality, activity or epoch. In short costume is a cultural visual of the people.

Dragnoun

(nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.

Dragnoun

Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.

Dragnoun

A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.

Dragnoun

Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

Dragnoun

witch house music

Dragnoun

The last position in a line of hikers.

Dragnoun

The act of suppressing wind flow to slow an aircraft in flight, as by use of flaps when landing.

Dragnoun

Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment.

‘He performed in drag.’;

Dragnoun

Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.

‘corporate drag’;

Dragverb

(transitive) To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.

Dragverb

(intransitive) To move slowly.

‘Time seems to drag when you’re waiting for a bus.’;

Dragverb

To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.

Dragverb

To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

Dragverb

To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

Dragverb

To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

Dragverb

(computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.

‘Drag the file into the window to open it.’;

Dragverb

(chiefly of a vehicle) To inadvertently rub or scrape on a surface.

‘The car was so low to the ground that its muffler was dragging on a speed bump.’;

Dragverb

(soccer) To hit or kick off target.

Dragverb

To fish with a dragnet.

Dragverb

To search for something, as a lost object or body, by dragging something along the bottom of a body of water.

Dragverb

To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.

Dragverb

(figurative) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.

Dragverb

(slang) To roast, say negative things about, or call attention to the flaws of (someone).

‘You just drag him 'cause he's got more money than you.’;

Dragverb

To perform as a drag queen or drag king.

Dragnoun

A confection; a comfit; a drug.

Dragnoun

The act of dragging; anything which is dragged.

Dragnoun

A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc.

Dragnoun

A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag.

Dragnoun

A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage.

Dragnoun

A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground.

Dragnoun

Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See Drag sail (below).

‘My lectures were only a pleasure to me, and no drag.’;

Dragnoun

Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

Dragnoun

The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope.

Dragnoun

A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

Dragnoun

The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel. See Citation under Drag, v. i., 3.

Dragverb

To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; - applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.

‘Dragged by the cords which through his feet were thrust.’; ‘The grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down.’; ‘A needless Alexandrine ends the songThat, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.’;

Dragverb

To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag.

‘Then while I dragged my brains for such a song.’;

Dragverb

To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

‘Have dragged a lingering life.’;

Dragverb

To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold.

Dragverb

To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

‘The day drags through, though storms keep out the sun.’; ‘Long, open panegyric drags at best.’;

Dragverb

To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

‘A propeller is said to drag when the sails urge the vessel faster than the revolutions of the screw can propel her.’;

Dragverb

To fish with a dragnet.

Dragnoun

the phenomenon of resistance to motion through a fluid

Dragnoun

something that slows or delays progress;

‘taxation is a drag on the economy’; ‘too many laws are a drag on the use of new land’;

Dragnoun

something tedious and boring;

‘peeling potatoes is a drag’;

Dragnoun

clothing that is conventionally worn by the opposite sex (especially women's clothing when worn by a man);

‘he went to the party dressed in drag’; ‘the waitresses looked like missionaries in drag’;

Dragnoun

a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke);

‘he took a puff on his pipe’; ‘he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly’;

Dragnoun

the act of dragging (pulling with force);

‘the drag up the hill exhausted him’;

Dragverb

pull, as against a resistance;

‘He dragged the big suitcase behind him’; ‘These worries were dragging at him’;

Dragverb

draw slowly or heavily;

‘haul stones’; ‘haul nets’;

Dragverb

force into some kind of situation, condition, or course of action;

‘They were swept up by the events’; ‘don't drag me into this business’;

Dragverb

move slowly and as if with great effort

Dragverb

to lag or linger behind;

‘But in so many other areas we still are dragging’;

Dragverb

suck in or take (air);

‘draw a deep breath’; ‘draw on a cigarette’;

Dragverb

use a computer mouse to move icons on the screen and select commands from a menu;

‘drag this icon to the lower right hand corner of the screen’;

Dragverb

walk without lifting the feet

Dragverb

search (as the bottom of a body of water) for something valuable or lost

Dragverb

persuade to come away from something attractive or interesting;

‘He dragged me away from the television set’;

Dragverb

proceed for an extended period of time;

‘The speech dragged on for two hours’;

Dragverb

pull (someone or something) along forcefully, roughly, or with difficulty

‘we dragged the boat up the beach’;

Dragverb

take (someone) to or from a place or event, despite their reluctance

‘my girlfriend is dragging me off to Rhodes for a week’;

Dragverb

go somewhere wearily, reluctantly, or with difficulty

‘I have to drag myself out of bed each day’;

Dragverb

move (an image or highlighted text) across a computer screen using a tool such as a mouse

‘you can move the icons into this group by dragging them in with the mouse’;

Dragverb

(of a person's clothes or an animal's tail) trail along the ground

‘the nuns walked in meditation, their habits dragging on the grassy verge’;

Dragverb

catch hold of and pull (something)

‘desperately, Jinny dragged at his arm’;

Dragverb

(of a ship) trail (an anchor) along the seabed, drifting in the process

‘the coaster was dragging her anchor in St Ives Bay’; ‘the anchor did not hold and they dragged further through the water’;

Dragverb

(of an anchor) fail to hold, causing a ship or boat to drift

‘his anchor had dragged and he found himself sailing out to sea’;

Dragverb

search the bottom of (a river, lake, or the sea) with grapnels or nets

‘frogmen had dragged the local river’;

Dragverb

(of time) pass slowly and tediously

‘the day dragged—eventually it was time for bed’;

Dragverb

(of a process or situation) continue at tedious and unnecessary length

‘the dispute between the two families dragged on for some years’;

Dragverb

protract something unnecessarily

‘he dragged out the process of serving them’;

Dragnoun

the action of pulling something forcefully or with difficulty

‘the drag of the current’;

Dragnoun

the longitudinal retarding force exerted by air or other fluid surrounding a moving object

‘the coating reduces aerodynamic drag’;

Dragnoun

a person or thing that impedes progress or development

‘Larry was turning out to be a drag on her career’;

Dragnoun

unnatural motion of a fishing fly caused by the pull of the line.

Dragnoun

an iron shoe that can be applied as a brake to the wheel of a cart or wagon.

Dragnoun

a boring or tiresome person or thing

‘working nine to five can be a drag’;

Dragnoun

an act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette

‘he took a long drag on his cigarette’;

Dragnoun

clothing more conventionally worn by the opposite sex, especially women's clothes worn by a man

‘a fashion show, complete with men in drag’;

Dragnoun

a street or road

‘the main drag is wide but there are few vehicles’;

Dragnoun

a thing that is pulled along the ground or through water.

Dragnoun

a harrow used for breaking up the surface of land.

Dragnoun

an apparatus for dredging or for recovering objects from the bottom of a river or lake.

Dragnoun

another term for dragnet

Dragnoun

a strong-smelling lure drawn before hounds as a substitute for a fox.

Dragnoun

a hunt using a drag lure.

Dragnoun

influence over other people

‘they had the education but they didn't have the drag’;

Dragnoun

one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a stroke preceded by two grace notes usually played with the other stick.

Dragnoun

short for drag race

Dragnoun

a private vehicle like a stagecoach, drawn by four horses.

Dragnoun

a car

‘a stately great drag with a smart chauffeur’;

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