VS.

Correct vs. Reprimand

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Correctadjective

Free from error; true; accurate.

Reprimandnoun

A severe, formal or official reproof; reprehension, rebuke, private or public.

Correctadjective

With good manners; well behaved; conforming with accepted standards of behaviour.

Reprimandverb

To reprove in a formal or official way.

Correctverb

(transitive) To make something that was wrong become right; to remove error from.

‘The navigator corrected the course of the ship.’;

Reprimandnoun

Severe or formal reproof; reprehension, private or public.

‘Goldsmith gave his landlady a sharp reprimand for her treatment of him.’;

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Correctverb

To grade (examination papers).

Reprimandverb

To reprove severely; to reprehend; to chide for a fault; to consure formally.

‘Germanicus was severely reprimanded by Tiberius for traveling into Egypt without his permission.’;

Correctverb

(transitive) To inform (someone) of their error.

‘It's rude to correct your parents.’;

Reprimandverb

To reprove publicly and officially, in execution of a sentence; as, the court ordered him to be reprimanded.

Correctverb

(transitive) To discipline; to punish.

Reprimandnoun

an act or expression of criticism and censure;

‘he had to take the rebuke with a smile on his face’;

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Correctadjective

Set right, or made straight; hence, conformable to truth, rectitude, or propriety, or to a just standard; not faulty or imperfect; free from error; as, correct behavior; correct views.

‘Always use the most correct editions.’;

Reprimandverb

rebuke formally

Correctverb

To make right; to bring to the standard of truth, justice, or propriety; to rectify; as, to correct manners or principles.

‘This is a defect in the first make of some men's minds which can scarce ever be corrected afterwards.’;

Reprimandverb

censure severely or angrily;

‘The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car’; ‘The deputy ragged the Prime Minister’; ‘The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup’;

Correctverb

To remove or retrench the faults or errors of; to amend; to set right; as, to correct the proof (that is, to mark upon the margin the changes to be made, or to make in the type the changes so marked).

Reprimand

A reprimand is a severe, formal or official reproof. Reprimanding takes in different forms in different legal systems.

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Correctverb

To bring back, or attempt to bring back, to propriety in morals; to reprove or punish for faults or deviations from moral rectitude; to chastise; to discipline; as, a child should be corrected for lying.

‘My accuser is my 'prentice; and when I did correct him for his fault the other day, he did vow upon his knees he would be even with me.’;

Correctverb

To counteract the qualities of one thing by those of another; - said of whatever is wrong or injurious; as, to correct the acidity of the stomach by alkaline preparations.

Correctverb

make right or correct;

‘Correct the mistakes’; ‘rectify the calculation’;

Correctverb

make reparations or amends for;

‘right a wrongs done to the victims of the Holocaust’;

Correctverb

censure severely;

‘She chastised him for his insensitive remarks’;

Correctverb

adjust or make up for;

‘engineers will work to correct the effects or air resistance’;

Correctverb

punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience;

‘The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently’;

Correctverb

go down in value;

‘the stock market corrected’; ‘prices slumped’;

Correctverb

alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard;

‘Adjust the clock, please’; ‘correct the alignment of the front wheels’;

Correctverb

treat a defect;

‘The new contact lenses will correct for his myopia’;

Correctadjective

free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth;

‘the correct answer’; ‘the correct version’; ‘the right answer’; ‘took the right road’; ‘the right decision’;

Correctadjective

socially right or correct;

‘it isn't right to leave the party without saying goodbye’; ‘correct behavior’;

Correctadjective

in accord with accepted standards of usage or procedure;

‘what's the right word for this?’; ‘the right way to open oysters’;

Correctadjective

correct in opinion or judgment;

‘time proved him right’;

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