VS.

Coo vs. Cop

Published:
Views: 89

Coonoun

The murmuring sound made by a dove or pigeon.

Copnoun

(obsolete) A spider.

Coonoun

(by extension) An expression of pleasure made by a person.

Copnoun

A police officer or prison guard.

Cooverb

(ambitransitive) To make a soft murmuring sound, as a pigeon.

Copnoun

(crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cooverb

(intransitive) To speak in an admiring fashion, to be enthusiastic about.

Copnoun

(obsolete) The top, summit, especially of a hill.

Cooadjective

(slang) Cool.

Copnoun

(obsolete) The crown (of the head); also the head itself.

‘The stature is bowed down in age, the cop is depressed.’;

Coointerjection

An expression of approval, fright, surprise, etc.

Copnoun

A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cooverb

To make a low repeated cry or sound, like the characteristic note of pigeons or doves.

‘The stockdove only through the forest cooes,Mournfully hoarse.’;

Copnoun

A merlon.

Cooverb

To show affection; to act in a loving way. See under Bill, v. i.

Copverb

To obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take.

Coonoun

the sound made by a pigeon

Copverb

(transitive) To (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.

‘When caught, he would often cop a vicious blow from his father’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Cooverb

speak softly or lovingly;

‘The mother who held her baby was cooing softly’;

Copverb

To see and record a railway locomotive for the first time.

Cooverb

cry softly, as of pigeons

Copverb

(transitive) To steal.

Copverb

(transitive) To adopt.

‘No need to cop an attitude with me, junior.’;

Copverb

(transitive) To earn by bad behavior.

Copverb

to admit, especially to a crime.

‘I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?’; ‘Harold copped to being known as "Dirty Harry".’;

Copnoun

The top of a thing; the head; a crest.

‘Cop they used to callThe tops of many hills.’;

Copnoun

A conical or conical-ended mass of coiled thread, yarn, or roving, wound upon a spindle, etc.

Copnoun

A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.

Copnoun

Same as Merlon.

Copnoun

A policeman.

Copnoun

uncomplimentary terms for a policeman

Copverb

take by theft;

‘Someone snitched my wallet!’;

Copverb

take into custody;

‘the police nabbed the suspected criminals’;

Copnoun

a police officer

‘a cop in a patrol car gave chase’;

Copnoun

shrewdness; practical intelligence

‘he had the cop-on to stay clear of Hugh Thornley’;

Copnoun

a conical mass of thread wound on to a spindle.

Copverb

catch or arrest (an offender)

‘he was copped for speeding’;

Copverb

incur (something unwelcome)

‘England's captain copped most of the blame’; ‘an easy journey, if we don't cop any rough weather’;

Copverb

get into trouble

‘will you cop it from your dad if you get back late?’;

Copverb

be killed

‘he almost copped it in a horrific accident’;

Copverb

receive or attain (something welcome)

‘she copped an award for her role in the film’;

Copverb

obtain (an illegal drug)

‘he copped some hash for me’;

Copverb

strike (an attitude or pose)

‘I copped an attitude—I acted real tough’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons