VS.

Contempt vs. Disgust

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Contemptnoun

(uncountable) The state or act of contemning; the feeling or attitude of regarding someone or something as inferior, base, or worthless; scorn, disdain.

Disgustverb

To cause an intense dislike for something.

‘It disgusts me to see her chew with her mouth open.’;

Contemptnoun

The state of being despised or dishonored; disgrace.

Disgustnoun

An intense dislike or loathing someone feels for something bad or nasty.

‘With an air of disgust, she stormed out of the room.’;

Contemptnoun

(legal) Open disrespect or willful disobedience of the authority of a court of law or legislative body.

Disgustverb

To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; - often with at, with, or by.

‘To disgust him with the world and its vanities.’; ‘Ærius is expressly declared . . . to have been disgusted at failing.’; ‘Alarmed and disgusted by the proceedings of the convention.’;

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Contemptnoun

The act of contemning or despising; the feeling with which one regards that which is esteemed mean, vile, or worthless; disdain; scorn.

‘Criminal contempt of public feeling.’; ‘Nothing, says Longinus, can be great, the contempt of which is great.’;

Disgustnoun

Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; - said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for anything which offends the physical organs of taste; now rather of the analogous repugnance excited by anything extremely unpleasant to the moral taste or higher sensibilities of our nature; as, an act of cruelty may excite disgust.

‘The manner of doing is more consequence than the thing done, and upon that depends the satisfaction or disgust wherewith it is received.’; ‘In a vulgar hack writer such oddities would have excited only disgust.’;

Contemptnoun

The state of being despised; disgrace; shame.

‘Contempt and begarry hangs upon thy back.’;

Disgustnoun

strong feelings of dislike

Contemptnoun

An act or expression denoting contempt.

‘Little insults and contempts.’; ‘The contempt and anger of his lip.’;

Disgustverb

fill with distaste;

‘This spoilt food disgusts me’;

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Contemptnoun

Disobedience of the rules, orders, or process of a court of justice, or of rules or orders of a legislative body; disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent language or behavior in presence of a court, tending to disturb its proceedings, or impair the respect due to its authority.

Disgustverb

cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of;

‘The pornographic pictures sickened us’;

Contemptnoun

lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike;

‘he was held in contempt’; ‘the despite in which outsiders were held is legendary’;

Disgust

Disgust (Middle French: desgouster, from Latin gustus, ) is an emotional response of rejection or revulsion to something potentially contagious or something considered offensive, distasteful, or unpleasant. In The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, Charles Darwin wrote that disgust is a sensation that refers to something revolting.

‘taste’;

Contemptnoun

a manner that is generally disrespectful and contemptuous

Contemptnoun

open disrespect for a person or thing

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Contemptnoun

a willful disobedience to or disrespect for the authority of a court or legislative body

Contemptnoun

the feeling that a person or a thing is worthless or beneath consideration

‘Pam stared at the girl with total contempt’; ‘it is no wonder journalists are held in such contempt’;

Contemptnoun

disregard for something that should be considered

‘this action displays an arrogant contempt for the wishes of the majority’;

Contemptnoun

the offence of being disobedient to or disrespectful of a court of law and its officers

‘when he was found to have lied to the House this was a contempt’;

Contempt

Contempt is a pattern of attitudes and behaviour, often towards an individual or group, but sometimes towards an ideology, which has the characteristics of disgust and anger.The word originated in 1393 in Old French contempt, contemps, from the Latin word contemptus meaning . It is the past participle of contemnere and from con- intensive prefix + temnere .

‘scorn’; ‘to slight, scorn’;

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