VS.

Conscience vs. Intuition

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Consciencenoun

The moral sense of right and wrong, chiefly as it affects one's own behaviour.

‘Your conscience is your highest authority.’;

Intuitionnoun

Immediate cognition without the use of conscious rational processes.

Consciencenoun

(chiefly fiction) A personification of the moral sense of right and wrong, usually in the form of a person, a being or merely a voice that gives moral lessons and advices.

Intuitionnoun

A perceptive insight gained by the use of this faculty.

Consciencenoun

(obsolete) Consciousness; thinking; awareness, especially self-awareness.

Intuitionnoun

A looking after; a regard to.

‘What, no reflection on a reward! He might have an intuition at it, as the encouragement, though not the cause, of his pains.’;

Consciencenoun

Knowledge of one's own thoughts or actions; consciousness.

‘The sweetest cordial we receive, at last,Is conscience of our virtuous actions past.’;

Intuitionnoun

Direct apprehension or cognition; immediate knowledge, as in perception or consciousness; - distinguished from "mediate" knowledge, as in reasoning; as, the mind knows by intuition that black is not white, that a circle is not a square, that three are more than two, etc.; quick or ready insight or apprehension.

‘Sagacity and a nameless something more, - let us call it intuition.’;

Consciencenoun

The faculty, power, or inward principle which decides as to the character of one's own actions, purposes, and affections, warning against and condemning that which is wrong, and approving and prompting to that which is right; the moral faculty passing judgment on one's self; the moral sense.

‘My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,And every tongue brings in a several tale,And every tale condemns me for a villain.’; ‘As science means knowledge, conscience etymologically means self-knowledge . . . But the English word implies a moral standard of action in the mind as well as a consciousness of our own actions. . . . Conscience is the reason, employed about questions of right and wrong, and accompanied with the sentiments of approbation and condemnation.’;

Intuitionnoun

Any object or truth discerned by intuition.

Consciencenoun

The estimate or determination of conscience; conviction or right or duty.

‘Conscience supposes the existence of some such [i.e., moral] faculty, and properly signifies our consciousness of having acted agreeably or contrary to its directions.’;

Intuitionnoun

Any quick insight, recognized immediately without a reasoning process; a belief arrived at unconsciously; - often it is based on extensive experience of a subject.

Consciencenoun

Tenderness of feeling; pity.

Intuitionnoun

The ability to have insight into a matter without conscious thought; as, his chemical intuition allowed him to predict compound conformations without any conscious calculation; a mother's intuition often tells her what is best for her child.

Consciencenoun

motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions

Intuitionnoun

instinctive knowing (without the use of rational processes)

Consciencenoun

conformity to one's own sense of right conduct;

‘a person of unflagging conscience’;

Intuitionnoun

an impression that something might be the case;

‘he had an intuition that something had gone wrong’;

Consciencenoun

a feeling of shame when you do something immoral;

‘he has no conscience about his cruelty’;

Intuitionnoun

the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning

‘we shall allow our intuition to guide us’;

Consciencenoun

a person's moral sense of right and wrong, viewed as acting as a guide to one's behaviour

‘he had a guilty conscience about his desires’; ‘Ben was suffering a pang of conscience’;

Intuitionnoun

a thing that one knows or considers likely from instinctive feeling rather than conscious reasoning

‘your insights and intuitions as a native speaker are positively sought’;

Conscience

Conscience is a cognitive process that elicits emotion and rational associations based on an individual's moral philosophy or value system. Conscience stands in contrast to elicited emotion or thought due to associations based on immediate sensory perceptions and reflexive responses, as in sympathetic central nervous system responses.

Intuition

Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge without recourse to conscious reasoning. Different fields use the word in very different ways, including but not limited to: direct access to unconscious knowledge; unconscious cognition; inner sensing; inner insight to unconscious pattern-recognition; and the ability to understand something instinctively, without any need for conscious reasoning.The word intuition comes from the Latin verb intueri translated as or from the late middle English word intuit, .

‘intuition’; ‘consider’; ‘to contemplate’;

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