VS.

Conjure vs. Invoke

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Conjureverb

(intransitive) To perform magic tricks.

‘He started conjuring at the age of 15, and is now a famous stage magician.’;

Invokeverb

(transitive) To call upon (a person, especially a god) for help, assistance or guidance.

Conjureverb

(transitive) To summon (a devil, etc.) using supernatural power.

Invokeverb

(transitive) To appeal for validation to a (notably cited) authority.

‘In certain Christian circles, invoking the Bible constitutes irrefutable proof.’;

Conjureverb

To practice black magic.

Invokeverb

(transitive) To conjure up with incantations.

‘This satanist ritual invokes Beelzebub.’;

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Conjureverb

To enchant or bewitch.

Invokeverb

(transitive) To bring about as an inevitable consequence.

‘Blasphemy is taboo as it may invoke divine wrath.’;

Conjureverb

(transitive) To evoke. en

Invokeverb

(transitive) To solicit, petition for, appeal to a favorable attitude.

‘The envoy invoked the King of Kings's magnanimity to reduce his province's tribute after another draught.’;

Conjureverb

(transitive) To imagine or picture in the mind.

Invokeverb

To cause (a program or subroutine) to execute.

‘Interactive programs let the users enter choices and invoke the corresponding routines.’;

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Conjureverb

To make an urgent request to; to appeal to or beseech.

Invokeverb

To call on for aid or protection; to invite earnestly or solemnly; to summon; to address in prayer; to solicit or demand by invocation; to implore; as, to invoke the Supreme Being, or to invoke His and blessing.

‘Go, my dread lord, to your great grandsire's tomb, . . . Invoke his warlike spirit.’;

Conjureverb

To conspire or plot.

Invokeverb

evoke or call forth, with or as if by magic;

‘raise the specter of unemployment’; ‘he conjured wild birds in the air’; ‘stir a disturbance’; ‘call down the spirits from the mountain’;

Conjurenoun

(African American Vernacular English) The practice of magic; hoodoo; conjuration.

Invokeverb

cite as an authority; resort to;

‘He invoked the law that would save him’; ‘I appealed to the law of 1900’; ‘She invoked an ancient law’;

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Conjureverb

To call on or summon by a sacred name or in solemn manner; to implore earnestly; to adjure.

‘I conjure you, let him know,Whate'er was done against him, Cato did it.’;

Invokeverb

request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection;

‘appeal to somebody for help’; ‘Invoke God in times of trouble’;

Conjureverb

To combine together by an oath; to conspire; to confederate.

‘Drew after him the third part of Heaven's sonsConjured against the Highest.’;

Conjureverb

To affect or effect by conjuration; to call forth or send away by magic arts; to excite or alter, as if by magic or by the aid of supernatural powers.

‘The habitation which your prophet . . . conjured the devil into.’;

Conjureverb

To practice magical arts; to use the tricks of a conjurer; to juggle; to charm.

‘She conjures; away with her.’;

Conjureverb

evoke or call forth, with or as if by magic;

‘raise the specter of unemployment’; ‘he conjured wild birds in the air’; ‘stir a disturbance’; ‘call down the spirits from the mountain’;

Conjureverb

ask for or request earnestly;

‘The prophet bid all people to become good persons’;

Conjureverb

engage in plotting or enter into a conspiracy, swear together;

‘They conspired to overthrow the government’;

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