VS.

Conflate vs. Elide

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Conflateverb

To bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity.

Elideverb

To leave out or omit (something).

Conflateverb

To mix together different elements.

Elideverb

To cut off, as a vowel or a syllable.

Conflateverb

(by extension) To fail to properly distinguish or keep separate (things); to mistakenly treat (them) as equivalent.

‘“Bacon was Lord Chancellor of England and the first European to experiment with gunpowder.” — “No, you are conflating Francis Bacon and Roger Bacon.”’;

Elideverb

To conflate; to smear together; to blur the distinction between.

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Conflateadjective

(biblical criticism) Combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.

Elideverb

To break or dash in pieces; to demolish; as, to elide the force of an argument.

Conflatenoun

(biblical criticism) A conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together.

Elideverb

To cut off, as a vowel or a syllable, usually the final one; to subject to elision.

Conflateverb

To blow together; to bring together; to collect; to fuse together; to join or weld; to consolidate.

‘The State-General, created and conflated by the passionate effort of the whole nation.’;

Elideverb

leave or strike out;

‘This vowel is usually elided before a single consonant’;

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Conflateverb

to ignore distinctions between, by treating two or more distinguishable objects or ideas as one; to confuse.

Conflateverb

mix together different elements;

‘The colors blend well’;

Conflateverb

combine (two or more sets of information, texts, ideas, etc.) into one

‘the urban crisis conflates a number of different economic, political, and social issues’;

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