VS.

Confiscate vs. Expropriate

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Confiscateverb

(transitive) To use one's authority to lay claim to and separate a possession from its holder.

‘In schools it is common for teachers to confiscate electronic games and other distractions.’;

Expropriateverb

(transitive) To deprive a person of (their private property) for public use.

Confiscateadjective

(obsolete) Confiscated; seized and appropriated by the government for public use; forfeit.

Expropriateverb

To put out of one's possession; to surrender the ownership of; also, to deprive of possession or proprietary rights.

‘Expropriate these [bad landlords] as the monks were expropriated by Act of Parliament.’;

Confiscateadjective

Seized and appropriated by the government to the public use; forfeited.

‘Lest that your goods too soon be confiscate.’;

Expropriateverb

deprive of possessions;

‘The Communist government expropriated the landowners’;

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Confiscateverb

To seize as forfeited to the public treasury; to appropriate to the public use.

‘It was judged that he should be banished and his whole estate confiscated and seized.’;

Confiscateverb

take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority;

‘The FBI seized the drugs’; ‘The customs agents impounded the illegal shipment’; ‘The police confiscated the stolen artwork’;

Confiscateadjective

surrendered as a penalty

Confiscateadjective

taken without permission or consent especially by public authority;

‘the condemned land was used for a highway cloverleaf’; ‘the confiscated liquor was poured down the drain’;

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