VS.

Confidence vs. Moral

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Wikipedia
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  • Confidence (noun)

    Self-assurance.

  • Confidence (noun)

    A feeling of certainty; firm trust or belief; faith.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Information held in secret.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Boldness; presumption.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behaviour, especially for teaching right behaviour.

    "moral judgments;"

    "a moral poem"

  • Moral (adjective)

    Conforming to a standard of right behaviour; sanctioned by or operative on one's conscience or ethical judgment.

    "a moral obligation"

  • Moral (adjective)

    Capable of right and wrong action.

    "a moral agent"

  • Moral (adjective)

    Probable but not proved.

    "a moral certainty"

  • Moral (adjective)

    Positively affecting the mind, confidence, or will.

    "a moral victory;"

    "moral support"

  • Moral (noun)

    The ethical significance or practical lesson.

    "The moral of w|The Boy Who Cried Wolf is that if you repeatedly lie, people won't believe you when you tell the truth."

  • Moral (noun)

    Moral practices or teachings: modes of conduct.

  • Moral (noun)

    A morality play.

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
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  • Confidence (noun)

    The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; - formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.

  • Confidence (noun)

    That in which faith is put or reliance had.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Trustful; without fear or suspicion; frank; unreserved.

  • Confidence (noun)

    The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstances; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; - often with self prefixed.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Private conversation; (pl.) secrets shared; as, there were confidences between them.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Having an excess of assurance; bold to a fault; dogmatical; impudent; presumptuous.

  • Confidence (noun)

    Giving occasion for confidence.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Relating to duty or obligation; pertaining to those intentions and actions of which right and wrong, virtue and vice, are predicated, or to the rules by which such intentions and actions ought to be directed; relating to the practice, manners, or conduct of men as social beings in relation to each other, as respects right and wrong, so far as they are properly subject to rules.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Conformed to accepted rules of right; acting in conformity with such rules; virtuous; just; as, a moral man. Used sometimes in distinction from religious; as, a moral rather than a religious life.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Capable of right and wrong action or of being governed by a sense of right; subject to the law of duty.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Acting upon or through one's moral nature or sense of right, or suited to act in such a manner; as, a moral arguments; moral considerations. Sometimes opposed to material and physical; as, moral pressure or support.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Supported by reason or probability; practically sufficient; - opposed to legal or demonstrable; as, a moral evidence; a moral certainty.

  • Moral (adjective)

    Serving to teach or convey a moral; as, a moral lesson; moral tales.

  • Moral (noun)

    The doctrine or practice of the duties of life; manner of living as regards right and wrong; conduct; behavior; - usually in the plural.

  • Moral (noun)

    The inner meaning or significance of a fable, a narrative, an occurrence, an experience, etc.; the practical lesson which anything is designed or fitted to teach; the doctrine meant to be inculcated by a fiction; a maxim.

  • Moral (noun)

    A morality play. See Morality, 5.

  • Moral (verb)

    To moralize.

Webster Dictionary
  • Confidence (noun)

    freedom from doubt; belief in yourself and your abilities;

    "his assurance in his superiority did not make him popular"

    "after that failure he lost his confidence"

    "she spoke with authority"

  • Confidence (noun)

    a feeling of trust (in someone or something);

    "I have confidence in our team"

    "confidence is always borrowed, never owned"

  • Confidence (noun)

    a state of confident hopefulness that events will be favorable;

    "public confidence in the economy"

  • Confidence (noun)

    a trustful relationship;

    "he took me into his confidence"

    "he betrayed their trust"

  • Confidence (noun)

    a secret that is confided or entrusted to another;

    "everyone trusted him with their confidences"

    "the priest could not reveal her confidences"

  • Moral (noun)

    the significance of a story or event;

    "the moral of the story is to love thy neighbor"

  • Moral (adjective)

    relating to principles of right and wrong; i.e. to morals or ethics;

    "moral philosophy"

  • Moral (adjective)

    concerned with principles of right and wrong or conforming to standards of behavior and character based on those principles;

    "moral sense"

    "a moral scrutiny"

    "a moral lesson"

    "a moral quandary"

    "moral convictions"

    "a moral life"

  • Moral (adjective)

    adhering to ethical and moral principles;

    "it seems ethical and right"

    "followed the only honorable course of action"

    "had the moral courage to stand alone"

  • Moral (adjective)

    arising from the sense of right and wrong;

    "a moral obligation"

  • Moral (adjective)

    psychological rather than physical or tangible in effect;

    "a moral victory"

    "moral support"

  • Moral (adjective)

    based on strong likelihood or firm conviction rather than actual evidence;

    "a moral certainty"

Princeton's WordNet

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