VS.

Condition vs. Warranty

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Conditionnoun

A logical clause or phrase that a conditional statement uses. The phrase can either be true or false.

Warrantynoun

(countable) A guarantee that a certain outcome or obligation will be fulfilled; security.

Conditionnoun

A requirement or requisite.

‘Environmental protection is a condition for sustainability.’; ‘What other planets might have the right conditions for life?’; ‘The union had a dispute over sick time and other conditions of employment.’;

Warrantynoun

An obsolete legal agreement that was a real covenant and ran with the land, whereby the grantor and his heirs of a piece of real estate held in freehold were required to officially guarantee their claim and plead one’s case for the title. If evicted by someone with a superior claim (paramount title) they were also required to hand over other real estate of equal value in recompense. It has now been replaced by personal covenants and the covenant of warranty.

Conditionnoun

(legal) A clause in a contract or agreement indicating that a certain contingency may modify the principal obligation in some way.

Warrantynoun

A covenant, also called the covenant of warranty, whereby the grantor assures the grantee that he or she not be subject to the claims of someone with a paramount title, thereby guaranteeing the status of the title that is being conveyed.

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Conditionnoun

The health status of a medical patient.

‘My aunt couldn't walk up the stairs in her condition.’;

Warrantynoun

A legal agreement, either written or oral (an expressed warranty) or implied through the actions of the buyer and seller (an implied warranty), which states that the goods or property in question will be in exactly the same state as promised, such as in a sale of an item or piece of real estate.

Conditionnoun

The state or quality.

‘National reports on the condition of public education are dismal.’; ‘The condition of man can be classified as civilized or uncivilized.’;

Warrantynoun

(countable) A written guarantee, usually over a fixed period, provided to someone who buys a product or item, which states that repairs will be provided free of charge in case of damage or a fault.

‘I took out an extended warranty on my television for five years at a cost of $100.’; ‘I made sure to check the terms of my warranty for my computer to ensure I was covered in case it broke down.’; ‘It's always a good idea to get a good warranty on anything you buy that you think may break down.’;

Conditionnoun

A particular state of being.

‘Hypnosis is a peculiar condition of the nervous system.’; ‘Steps were taken to ameliorate the condition of slavery.’; ‘Security is defined as the condition of not being threatened.’; ‘Aging is a condition over which we are powerless.’;

Warrantynoun

A stipulation of an insurance policy made by an insuree, guaranteeing that the facts of the policy are true and the insurance risk is as stated, which if not fulfilled renders the policy void.

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Conditionnoun

(obsolete) The situation of a person or persons, particularly their social and/or economic class, rank.

‘A man of his condition has no place to make request.’;

Warrantynoun

Justification or mandate to do something, especially in terms of one’s personal conduct.

Conditionverb

To subject to the process of acclimation.

‘I became conditioned to the absence of seasons in San Diego.’;

Warrantyverb

To warrant; to guarantee.

Conditionverb

To subject to different conditions, especially as an exercise.

‘They were conditioning their shins in their karate class.’;

Warrantynoun

A covenant real, whereby the grantor of an estate of freehold and his heirs were bound to warrant and defend the title, and, in case of eviction by title paramount, to yield other lands of equal value in recompense. This warranty has long singe become obsolete, and its place supplied by personal covenants for title. Among these is the covenant of warranty, which runs with the land, and is in the nature of a real covenant.

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Conditionverb

(transitive) To place conditions or limitations upon.

Warrantynoun

An engagement or undertaking, express or implied, that a certain fact regarding the subject of a contract is, or shall be, as it is expressly or impliedly declared or promised to be. In sales of goods by persons in possession, there is an implied warranty of title, but, as to the quality of goods, the rule of every sale is, Caveat emptor.

Conditionverb

To shape the behaviour of someone to do something.

Warrantynoun

A stipulation or engagement by a party insured, that certain things, relating to the subject of insurance, or affecting the risk, exist, or shall exist, or have been done, or shall be done. These warranties, when express, should appear in the policy; but there are certain implied warranties.

Conditionverb

(transitive) To treat (the hair) with hair conditioner.

Warrantynoun

Justificatory mandate or precept; authority; warrant.

‘If they disobey precept, that is no excuse to us, nor gives us any warranty . . . to disobey likewise.’;

Conditionverb

(transitive) To contract; to stipulate; to agree.

Warrantynoun

Security; warrant; guaranty.

‘The stamp was a warranty of the public.’;

Conditionverb

(transitive) To test or assay, as silk (to ascertain the proportion of moisture it contains).

Warrantyverb

To warrant; to guarantee.

Conditionverb

To put under conditions; to require to pass a new examination or to make up a specified study, as a condition of remaining in one's class or in college.

‘to condition a student who has failed in some branch of study’;

Warrantynoun

a written assurance that some product or service will be provided or will meet certain specifications

Conditionverb

To impose upon an object those relations or conditions without which knowledge and thought are alleged to be impossible.

Warranty

In contract law, a warranty is a promise which is not a condition of the contract or an innominate term: (1) it is a term , and (2) which only entitles the innocent party to damages if it is breached: i.e. the warranty is not true or the defaulting party does not perform the contract in accordance with the terms of the warranty.

‘not going to the root of the contract’;

Conditionnoun

Mode or state of being; state or situation with regard to external circumstances or influences, or to physical or mental integrity, health, strength, etc.; predicament; rank; position, estate.

‘I am in my conditionA prince, Miranda; I do think, a king.’; ‘And O, what man's condition can be worseThan his whom plenty starves and blessings curse?’; ‘The new conditions of life.’;

Conditionnoun

Essential quality; property; attribute.

‘It seemed to us a condition and property of divine powers and beings to be hidden and unseen to others.’;

Conditionnoun

Temperament; disposition; character.

‘The condition of a saint and the complexion of a devil.’;

Conditionnoun

That which must exist as the occasion or concomitant of something else; that which is requisite in order that something else should take effect; an essential qualification; stipulation; terms specified.

‘I had as lief take her dowry with this condition, to be whipped at the high cross every morning.’; ‘Many are apt to believe remission of sins, but they believe it without the condition of repentance.’;

Conditionnoun

A clause in a contract, or agreement, which has for its object to suspend, to defeat, or in some way to modify, the principal obligation; or, in case of a will, to suspend, revoke, or modify a devise or bequest. It is also the case of a future uncertain event, which may or may not happen, and on the occurrence or non-occurrence of which, the accomplishment, recission, or modification of an obligation or testamentary disposition is made to depend.

Conditionverb

To make terms; to stipulate.

‘Pay me back my credit,And I'll condition with ye.’;

Conditionverb

To impose upon an object those relations or conditions without which knowledge and thought are alleged to be impossible.

‘To think of a thing is to condition.’;

Conditionverb

To invest with, or limit by, conditions; to burden or qualify by a condition; to impose or be imposed as the condition of.

‘Seas, that daily gain upon the shore,Have ebb and flow conditioning their march.’;

Conditionverb

To contract; to stipulate; to agree.

‘It was conditioned between Saturn and Titan, that Saturn should put to death all his male children.’;

Conditionverb

To put under conditions; to require to pass a new examination or to make up a specified study, as a condition of remaining in one's class or in college; as, to condition a student who has failed in some branch of study.

Conditionverb

To test or assay, as silk (to ascertain the proportion of moisture it contains).

Conditionverb

train; acclimate.

Conditionnoun

a state at a particular time;

‘a condition (or state) of disrepair’; ‘the current status of the arms negotiations’;

Conditionnoun

a mode of being or form of existence of a person or thing;

‘the human condition’;

Conditionnoun

an assumption on which rests the validity or effect of something else

Conditionnoun

(usually plural) a statement of what is required as part of an agreement;

‘the contract set out the conditions of the lease’; ‘the terms of the treaty were generous’;

Conditionnoun

the state of (good) health (especially in the phrases `in condition' or `in shape' or `out of condition' or `out of shape')

Conditionnoun

information that should be kept in mind when making a decision;

‘another consideration is the time it would take’;

Conditionnoun

the procedure that is varied in order to estimate a variable's effect by comparison with a control condition

Conditionverb

establish a conditioned response

Conditionverb

train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control;

‘Parents must discipline their children’; ‘Is this dog trained?’;

Conditionverb

specify as a condition or requirement in a contract or agreement; make an express demand or provision in an agreement;

‘The will stipulates that she can live in the house for the rest of her life’; ‘The contract stipulates the dates of the payments’;

Conditionverb

put into a better state;

‘he conditions old cars’;

Conditionverb

apply conditioner to in order to make smooth and shiny;

‘I condition my hair after washing it’;

Conditionnoun

the state of something with regard to its appearance, quality, or working order

‘the wiring is in good condition’; ‘the bridge is in an extremely dangerous condition’;

Conditionnoun

a person's or animal's state of health or physical fitness

‘the baby was in good condition at birth’; ‘she was in a serious condition’;

Conditionnoun

an illness or other medical problem

‘a heart condition’;

Conditionnoun

the situation in life of a particular group

‘the sorrows of the human condition’;

Conditionnoun

social position

‘those of humbler condition’;

Conditionnoun

the circumstances or factors affecting the way in which people live or work, especially with regard to their well-being

‘harsh working conditions’;

Conditionnoun

the factors or prevailing situation influencing the performance or outcome of a process

‘present market conditions’;

Conditionnoun

the prevailing state of the weather, ground, or sea at a particular time, especially as it affects a sporting event

‘the appalling conditions determined the style of play’;

Conditionnoun

a situation that must exist before something else is possible or permitted

‘all personnel should comply with this policy as a condition of employment’; ‘for a member to borrow money, three conditions have to be met’;

Conditionverb

have a significant influence on or determine (the manner or outcome of something)

‘national choices are conditioned by the international political economy’;

Conditionverb

train or accustom to behave in a certain way or to accept certain circumstances

‘our minds are heavily conditioned and circumscribed by habit’; ‘they are beliefs which he has been conditioned to accept’;

Conditionverb

bring (something) into the desired state for use

‘a product for conditioning leather’;

Conditionverb

make (a person or animal) fit and healthy

‘he was six feet two of perfectly conditioned muscle and bone’;

Conditionverb

bring (beer) to maturation after fermentation while the yeast is still present

‘cask-conditioned real ales’;

Conditionverb

(of a beer) become conditioned

‘brews that are allowed to condition in the bottle’;

Conditionverb

apply a conditioner to (the hair)

‘I condition my hair regularly’;

Conditionverb

set prior requirements on (something) before it can occur or be done

‘Congressmen have sought to limit and condition military and economic aid’;

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