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Condescend vs. Descend — What's the Difference?

Condescend vs. Descend — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Condescend and Descend

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Condescend

To do something that one regards as beneath one's social rank or dignity; lower oneself. ]

Descend

To move from a higher to a lower place; come or go down.

Condescend

(intransitive) To come down from one's superior position; to deign (to do something).

Descend

To slope, extend, or incline downward
"A rough path descended like a steep stair into the plain" (J.R.R. Tolkien).

Condescend

(intransitive) To treat (someone) as though inferior; to be patronizing (toward someone); to talk down (to someone).
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Descend

To be related by genetic descent from an individual or individuals in a previous generation
He descends from Norwegian immigrants.

Condescend

To treat (someone) as though inferior; to be patronizing toward (someone); to talk down to (someone).

Descend

To come down from a source; derive
A tradition descending from colonial days.

Condescend

To consent, agree.

Descend

To pass by inheritance
The house has descended through four generations.

Condescend

To come down.

Descend

To lower oneself; stoop
"She, the conqueror, had descended to the level of the conquered" (James Bryce).

Condescend

To stoop or descend; to let one's self down; to submit; to waive the privilege of rank or dignity; to accommodate one's self to an inferior.
Can they think me so broken, so debasedWith corporal servitude, that my mind everWill condescend to such absurd commands?
Spain's mighty monarch,In gracious clemency, does condescend,On these conditions, to become your friend.
Those who thought they were honoring me by condescending to address a few words to me.

Descend

To proceed or progress downward, as in rank, pitch, or scale
Titles listed in descending order of importance.
Notes that descended to the lower register.

Condescend

To consent.
All parties willingly condescended heruento.

Descend

To arrive or attack in a sudden or overwhelming manner
Summer tourists descending on the seashore village.

Condescend

Behave in a patronizing and condescending manner

Descend

To move from a higher to lower part of; go down
I descended the staircase into the basement.

Condescend

Do something that one considers to be below one's dignity

Descend

To extend or proceed downward along
A road that descended the mountain in sharp curves.

Condescend

Debase oneself morally, act in an undignified, unworthy, or dishonorable way;
I won't stoop to reading other people's mail

Descend

(intransitive) To pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, for example by falling, flowing, walking, climbing etc.

Condescend

Treat condescendingly

Descend

To enter mentally; to retire.

Descend

To make an attack, or incursion, as if from a vantage ground; to come suddenly and with violence.
And on the suitors let thy wrath descend.

Descend

(intransitive) To come down to a lower, less fortunate, humbler, less virtuous, or worse, state or rank; to lower or abase oneself
He descended from his high estate.

Descend

(intransitive) To pass from the more general or important to the specific or less important matters to be considered.

Descend

(intransitive) To come down, as from a source, original, or stock

Descend

To be derived (from)

Descend

To proceed by generation or by transmission; to happen by inheritance.
The beggar may descend from a prince.
A crown descends to the heir.

Descend

To move toward the south, or to the southward.

Descend

To fall in pitch; to pass from a higher to a lower tone.

Descend

(transitive) To go down upon or along; to pass from a higher to a lower part of
They descended the river in boats; to descend a ladder

Descend

To pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, as by falling, flowing, walking, etc.; to plunge; to fall; to incline downward; - the opposite of ascend.
The rain descended, and the floods came.
We will here descend to matters of later date.

Descend

To enter mentally; to retire.
[He] with holiest meditations fed,Into himself descended.

Descend

To make an attack, or incursion, as if from a vantage ground; to come suddenly and with violence; - with on or upon.
And on the suitors let thy wrath descend.

Descend

To come down to a lower, less fortunate, humbler, less virtuous, or worse, state or station; to lower or abase one's self; as, he descended from his high estate.

Descend

To pass from the more general or important to the particular or less important matters to be considered.

Descend

To come down, as from a source, original, or stock; to be derived; to proceed by generation or by transmission; to fall or pass by inheritance; as, the beggar may descend from a prince; a crown descends to the heir.

Descend

To move toward the south, or to the southward.

Descend

To fall in pitch; to pass from a higher to a lower tone.

Descend

To go down upon or along; to pass from a higher to a lower part of; as, they descended the river in boats; to descend a ladder.
But never tears his cheek descended.

Descend

Move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way;
The temperature is going down
The barometer is falling
The curtain fell on the diva
Her hand went up and then fell again

Descend

Come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for example;
She was descended from an old Italian noble family
He comes from humble origins

Descend

Do something that one considers to be below one's dignity

Descend

Come as if by falling;
Night fell
Silence fell

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