VS.

Condensed vs. Full

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Condensedverb

simple past tense and past participle of condense

Fulladjective

Containing the maximum possible amount of that which can fit in the space available.

‘The jugs were full to the point of overflowing.’;

Condensedadjective

Highly concentrated, or packed into a small space.

‘a condensed typeface’;

Fulladjective

Complete; with nothing omitted.

‘Our book gives full treatment to the subject of angling.’;

Condensed

representing two or more ideas or emotions by a single symbol; as, a condensed expression of various feelings and ideas.

Fulladjective

Total, entire.

‘She had tattoos the full length of her arms.’; ‘He was prosecuted to the full extent of the law.’;

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Condensed

shortened by rewriting with fewer words; - used of texts; as, a condensed book. Opposite of unabridged.

Fulladjective

(informal) Having eaten to satisfaction, having a "full" stomach; replete.

‘"I'm full," he said, pushing back from the table.’;

Condensed

reduced to a stronger or more concentrated form; as, condensed milk. Opposite of uncondensed.

Fulladjective

Of a garment, of a size that is ample, wide, or having ample folds or pleats to be comfortable.

‘a full pleated skirt;’; ‘She needed her full clothing during her pregnancy.’;

Condensed

narrower than usual for a particular height; - of printers' type. Opposite of expanded.

Fulladjective

Having depth and body; rich.

‘a full singing voice’;

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Fulladjective

(obsolete) Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.

Fulladjective

Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it.

‘She's full of her latest project.’;

Fulladjective

Filled with emotions.

Fulladjective

(obsolete) Impregnated; made pregnant.

Fulladjective

Said of the three cards of the same rank in a full house.

‘Nines full of aces = three nines and two aces (999AA).’; ‘I'll beat him with my kings full! = three kings and two unspecified cards of the same rank.’;

Fulladjective

(AU) Drunk, intoxicated

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Fulladverb

(archaic) Fully; quite; very; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.

Fullnoun

Utmost measure or extent; highest state or degree; the state, position, or moment of fullness; fill.

‘I was fed to the full.’;

Fullnoun

(of the moon) The phase of the moon when it is entire face is illuminated, full moon.

Fullnoun

(freestyle skiing) An aerialist maneuver consisting of a backflip in conjunction and simultaneous with a complete twist.

Fullverb

(of the moon) To become full or wholly illuminated.

Fullverb

(transitive) To baptise.

Fullverb

To make cloth denser and firmer by soaking, beating and pressing, to waulk, walk

Fulladjective

Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; - said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people.

‘Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular.’;

Fulladjective

Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture.

Fulladjective

Not wanting in any essential quality; complete; entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon.

‘It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaohdreamed.’; ‘The man commandsLike a full soldier.’; ‘I can notRequest a fuller satisfactionThan you have freely granted.’;

Fulladjective

Sated; surfeited.

‘I am full of the burnt offerings of rams.’;

Fulladjective

Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.

‘Reading maketh a full man.’;

Fulladjective

Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project.

‘Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.’;

Fulladjective

Filled with emotions.

‘The heart is so full that a drop overfills it.’;

Fulladjective

Impregnated; made pregnant.

‘Ilia, the fair, . . . full of Mars.’;

Fullnoun

Complete measure; utmost extent; the highest state or degree.

‘The swan's-down feather,That stands upon the swell at full of tide.’;

Fulladverb

Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution; with the whole force or effect; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.

‘The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.’; ‘The diapason closing full in man.’; ‘Full in the center of the sacred wood.’;

Fullverb

To become full or wholly illuminated; as, the moon fulls at midnight.

Fullverb

To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a mill.

Fullverb

To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well.

Fullverb

beat for the purpose of cleaning and thickening;

‘full the cloth’;

Fullverb

make (a garment) fuller by pleating or gathering

Fullverb

increase in phase;

‘the moon is waxing’;

Fulladjective

containing as much or as many as is possible or normal;

‘a full glass’; ‘a sky full of stars’; ‘a full life’; ‘the auditorium was full to overflowing’;

Fulladjective

constituting the full quantity or extent; complete;

‘an entire town devastated by an earthquake’; ‘gave full attention’; ‘a total failure’;

Fulladjective

complete in extent or degree and in every particular;

‘a full game’; ‘a total eclipse’; ‘a total disaster’;

Fulladjective

filled to satisfaction with food or drink;

‘a full stomach’;

Fulladjective

(of sound) having marked depth and body;

‘full tones’; ‘a full voice’;

Fulladjective

having the normally expected amount;

‘gives full measure’; ‘gives good measure’; ‘a good mile from here’;

Fulladjective

being at a peak or culminating point;

‘broad day’; ‘full summer’; ‘high noon’;

Fulladjective

not separated into parts or shares; constituting an undivided unit;

‘an undivided interest in the property’; ‘a full share’;

Fulladjective

having ample fabric;

‘the current taste for wide trousers’; ‘a full skirt’;

Fulladverb

to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; (`full' in this sense is used as a combining form);

‘fully grown’; ‘he didn't fully understand’; ‘knew full well’; ‘full-grown’; ‘full-fledged’;

Fulladjective

containing or holding as much or as many as possible; having no empty space

‘waste bins full of rubbish’; ‘the hotel is full up’; ‘she could only nod, for her mouth was full’;

Fulladjective

having eaten to one's limits or satisfaction

‘she just ate till she was full up’;

Fulladjective

containing or holding much or many; having a large number of

‘his diary is full of entries about her’;

Fulladjective

having a lot of (a particular quality)

‘she was full of confidence’;

Fulladjective

unable to stop talking or thinking about

‘they had their photographs taken and he was full of it’;

Fulladjective

filled with intense emotion

‘his heart was full of hate’;

Fulladjective

involving many activities

‘he lived a full life’;

Fulladjective

drunk

‘we were all pretty well full when the van rolled into Mittagong’;

Fulladjective

not lacking or omitting anything; complete

‘a full range of sports facilities’;

Fulladjective

(often used for emphasis) reaching the utmost limit; maximum

‘he reached for the engine control and turned it up to full power’; ‘John made full use of all the tuition provided’;

Fulladjective

having all the privileges and status attached to a particular position

‘the country applied for full membership of the European Community’;

Fulladjective

(of a report or account) containing as much detail or information as possible

‘fuller descriptions of these varieties are available elsewhere’; ‘a full report of the conference’;

Fulladjective

used to emphasize an amount or quantity

‘he kept his fast pace going for the full 14-mile distance’;

Fulladjective

(of a covering material in bookbinding) used for the entire cover

‘bound in full cloth’;

Fulladjective

(of a person's figure or part of the body) plump or rounded

‘the fuller figure’; ‘she had full lips’;

Fulladjective

(of the hair) having body

‘volumizing products coat each strand, making hair appear thick and much fuller’;

Fulladjective

(of a garment) cut generously with gathers or folds or so as to fit loosely

‘the dress has a square neck and a full skirt’;

Fulladjective

(of a sound) strong and resonant

‘her voice had become fuller’; ‘this season's sopranos produced a full but translucent sound’;

Fulladjective

(of a flavour or colour) rich or intense

‘any unpasteurized cheese will have a fuller flavour than its treated counterpart’;

Fulladverb

straight; directly

‘she turned her head and looked full into his face’;

Fulladverb

very

‘he knew full well she was too polite to barge in’;

Fulladverb

entirely (used to emphasize an amount or quantity)

‘they talked for full half an hour’;

Fullnoun

the period, point, or state of the greatest fullness or strength.

Fullnoun

the state or time of full moon.

Fullnoun

the whole.

Fullverb

make (something) full; fill up

‘he full up the house with bawling’;

Fullverb

gather or pleat (fabric) so as to make a garment full

‘a straight piece fulled into a small band at the top’;

Fullverb

(of the moon or tide) become full

‘fulling moon aloft doth ride’;

Fullverb

clean, shrink, and felt (cloth) by heat, pressure, and moisture

‘weaving and fulling were all formerly part of the normal domestic scene’;

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