VS.

Comrade vs. Compadre

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Comradenoun

A mate, companion, or associate.

Compadrenoun

A friend or companion.

Comradenoun

A companion in battle; fellow soldier.

Compadre

The compadre (Spanish: [komˈpaðɾe], Portuguese: [kõˈpaðɾɨ], [kõˈpadɾi], literally or ) relationship between the parents and godparents of a child is an important bond that originates when a child is baptised in Iberian, Latin American, Filipino Christian and Indian Christian Brahmin families. The abstract noun compadrazgo (Spanish and Filipino), compadrio (in Portuguese), both meaning is sometimes used to refer to the institutional relationship between compadres.From the moment of a baptism ceremony, the godparents (godfather and godmother, padrino and madrina in Spanish, padrinho and madrinha in Portuguese, and ninong and ninang in Filipino) share the parenting role of the baptised child with the natural parents.

‘co-father’; ‘co-parent’; ‘co-parenthood,’;

Comradenoun

(communism) A fellow socialist, communist or other similarly politically aligned person.

‘Hello, comrade. Are you going to the Communist Party meeting tonight?’;

Comradenoun

(communism) A gender-neutral title, functionally similar to "Mr.", "Mrs.", "Miss", "Ms." etc, in a communist or socialist state.

‘Comrade Lenin inspired our people to undertake great works.’;

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Comradeverb

(transitive) To associate with in a friendly way.

Comradenoun

A mate, companion, or associate.

‘And turned my flying comrades to the charge.’; ‘I abjure all roofs, and choose . . . To be a comrade with the wolf and owl.’;

Comradenoun

a person who is frequently in the company of another;

‘drinking companions’; ‘comrades in arms’;

Comradenoun

a fellow member of the Communist Party

Comradenoun

used as a term of address for those male persons engaged in the same movement;

‘Greetings, comrade!’;

Comrade

The term comrade is used to mean 'mate', 'colleague', or 'ally', and derives from the Spanish and Portuguese, term camarada, literally meaning 'chamber mate', from Latin camera, meaning 'chamber' or 'room'. Political use of the term was inspired by the French Revolution, after which it grew into a form of address between socialists and workers.

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