VS.

Compose vs. Constitute

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Composeverb

(transitive) To make something by merging parts.

‘The editor composed a historical journal from many individual letters.’;

Constituteverb

(transitive) To set up; to establish; to enact.

Composeverb

(transitive) To make up the whole; to constitute.

‘A church is composed of its members.’;

Constituteverb

(transitive) To make up; to compose; to form.

Composeverb

To comprise.

Constituteverb

(transitive) To appoint, depute, or elect to an office; to make and empower.

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Composeverb

To construct by mental labor; to think up; particularly, to produce or create a literary or musical work.

‘The orator composed his speech over the week prior.’; ‘Nine numbered symphonies, including the Fifth, were composed by Beethoven.’; ‘It's difficult to compose without absolute silence.’;

Constitutenoun

(obsolete) An established law.

Composeverb

To calm; to free from agitation.

‘Try to compose your thoughts.’; ‘The defendant couldn't compose herself and was found in contempt.’;

Constituteverb

To cause to stand; to establish; to enact.

‘Laws appointed and constituted by lawful authority.’;

Composeverb

To arrange the elements of a photograph or other picture.

Constituteverb

To make up; to compose; to form.

‘Truth and reason constitute that intellectual gold that defies destruction.’;

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Composeverb

To settle (an argument, dispute etc.); to come to a settlement.

Constituteverb

To appoint, depute, or elect to an office; to make and empower.

‘Me didst Thou constitute a priest of thine.’;

Composeverb

To arrange in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition.

Constitutenoun

An established law.

Composeverb

To arrange (types) in a composing stick for printing; to typeset.

Constituteverb

form or compose;

‘This money is my only income’; ‘The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance’; ‘These constitute my entire belonging’; ‘The children made up the chorus’; ‘This sum represents my entire income for a year’; ‘These few men comprise his entire army’;

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Composeverb

To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.

‘Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection.’;

Constituteverb

create and charge with a task or function;

‘nominate a committee’;

Composeverb

To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute.

‘Their borrowed gold composedThe calf in Oreb.’; ‘A few useful things . . . compose their intellectual possessions.’;

Constituteverb

to compose or represent:

‘This wall forms the background of the stage setting’; ‘The branches made a roof’; ‘This makes a fine introduction’;

Composeverb

To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture.

‘Let me composeSomething in verse as well as prose.’; ‘The genius that composed such works as the "Standard" and "Last Supper".’;

Constituteverb

set up or lay the groundwork for;

‘establish a new department’;

Composeverb

To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate.

‘In a peaceful grave my corpse compose.’; ‘How in safety best we mayCompose our present evils.’;

Composeverb

To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet.

‘Compose thy mind;Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed.’;

Composeverb

To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).

Composeverb

To come to terms.

Composeverb

form the substance of;

‘Greed and ambition composed his personality’;

Composeverb

write music;

‘Beethoven composed nine symphonies’;

Composeverb

produce a literary work;

‘She composed a poem’; ‘He wrote four novels’;

Composeverb

put together out of existing material;

‘compile a list’;

Composeverb

calm (someone, especially oneself); make quiet;

‘She had to compose herself before she could reply to this terrible insult’;

Composeverb

draw up the plans or basic details for;

‘frame a policy’;

Composeverb

write or create (a work of art, especially music or poetry)

‘he composed the First Violin Sonata four years earlier’;

Composeverb

phrase (a letter or piece of writing) with great care and thought

‘the first sentence is so hard to compose’;

Composeverb

form (a whole) by ordering or arranging the parts, especially in an artistic way

‘compose and draw a still life’;

Composeverb

(of elements) constitute or make up (a whole, or a specified part of it)

‘Christians compose 40 per cent of the state's population’; ‘the National Congress is composed of ten senators’;

Composeverb

calm or settle (oneself or one's features or thoughts)

‘she tried to compose herself’;

Composeverb

settle (a dispute)

‘the king, with some difficulty, composed this difference’;

Composeverb

prepare (a text) for printing by manually, mechanically, or electronically setting up the letters and other characters in the order to be printed

‘in offices where close-set text was composed both men and women pieceworkers were normally employed’;

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