VS.

Complete vs. Done

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Completeverb

(transitive) To finish; to make done; to reach the end.

‘He completed the assignment on time.’;

Doneadjective

(of food) Ready, fully cooked.

‘As soon as the potatoes are done we can sit down and eat.’;

Completeverb

(transitive) To make whole or entire.

‘The last chapter completes the book nicely.’;

Doneadjective

Having completed or finished an activity.

‘He pushed his empty plate away, sighed and pronounced "I am done."’; ‘They were done playing and were picking up the toys when he arrived.’;

Completeadjective

With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.

‘My life will be complete once I buy this new television.’; ‘She offered me complete control of the project.’; ‘After she found the rook, the chess set was complete.’;

Doneadjective

Being exhausted or fully spent.

‘When the water is done we will only be able to go on for a few days.’;

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Completeadjective

Finished; ended; concluded; completed.

‘When your homework is complete, you can go and play with Martin.’;

Doneadjective

Without hope or prospect of completion or success.

‘He is done, after three falls there is no chance he will be able to finish.’;

Completeadjective

Generic intensifier.

‘He is a complete bastard!’; ‘It was a complete shock when he turned up on my doorstep.’; ‘Our vacation was a complete disaster.’;

Doneadjective

Fashionable, socially acceptable, tasteful.

‘I can't believe he just walked up and spoke to her like that, those kind of things just aren't done!’; ‘What is the done thing these days? I can't keep up!’;

Completeadjective

In which every Cauchy sequence converges to a point within the space.

Doneverb

inflection of do||past|part

‘I have done my work.’;

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Completeadjective

In which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.

Doneverb

Used in forming the perfective aspect; have.

‘I done did my best to raise y'all.’; ‘I woke up and found out she done left.’;

Completeadjective

In which all small limits exist.

Doneverb

(obsolete) plural simple present form of do

Completeadjective

In which every semantically valid well-formed formula is provable.

Donenoun

clipping of methadone

‘on the done’;

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Completeadjective

That is in a given complexity class and is such that every other problem in the class can be reduced to it (usually in polynomial time or logarithmic space).

Done

p. p. from Do, and formerly the infinitive.

Completeadjective

Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficiency; entire; perfect; consummate.

‘Ye are complete in him.’; ‘That thou, dead corse, again in complete steelRevisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon.’;

Done

It is done or agreed; let it be a match or bargain; - used elliptically.

Completeadjective

Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete.

‘This course of vanity almost complete.’;

Doneadjective

Given; executed; issued; made public; - used chiefly in the clause giving the date of a proclamation or public act.

Completeadjective

Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil.

Doneadjective

having finished or arrived at completion;

‘certain to make history before he's done’; ‘it's a done deed’; ‘after the treatment, the patient is through except for follow-up’; ‘almost through with his studies’;

Completeverb

To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education.

‘Bred only and completed to the tasteOf lustful appetence.’; ‘And, to complete her bliss, a fool for mate.’;

Doneadjective

cooked until ready to serve

Completeverb

come or bring to a finish or an end;

‘He finished the dishes’; ‘She completed the requirements for her Master's Degree’; ‘The fastest runner finished the race in just over 2 hours; others finished in over 4 hours’;

Completeverb

bring to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements;

‘A child would complete the family’;

Completeverb

complete or carry out;

‘discharge one's duties’;

Completeverb

complete a pass

Completeverb

write all the required information onto a form;

‘fill out this questionnaire, please!’; ‘make out a form’;

Completeadjective

having every necessary or normal part or component or step;

‘a complete meal’; ‘a complete wardrobe’; ‘a complete set pf the Britannica’; ‘a complete set of china’; ‘a complete defeat’; ‘a complete accounting’; ‘an incomplete flower’;

Completeadjective

perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities;

‘a complete gentleman’; ‘consummate happiness’; ‘a consummate performance’;

Completeadjective

having all four whorls or principal parts--sepals and petals and stamens and carpels (or pistils);

‘complete flowers’;

Completeadjective

highly skilled;

‘an accomplished pianist’; ‘a complete musician’;

Completeadjective

without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers;

‘an arrant fool’; ‘a complete coward’; ‘a consummate fool’; ‘a double-dyed villain’; ‘gross negligence’; ‘a perfect idiot’; ‘pure folly’; ‘what a sodding mess’; ‘stark staring mad’; ‘a thoroughgoing villain’; ‘utter nonsense’;

Completeadjective

having come or been brought to a conclusion;

‘the harvesting was complete’; ‘the affair is over, ended, finished’; ‘the abruptly terminated interview’;

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