VS.

Command vs. Imperative

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Commandnoun

An order to do something.

‘I was given a command to cease shooting.’;

Imperativeadjective

Essential; crucial; extremely important.

‘That you come here right now is imperative.’;

Commandnoun

The right or authority to order, control or dispose of; the right to be obeyed or to compel obedience.

‘to have command of an army’;

Imperativeadjective

(grammar) Of, or relating to the imperative mood.

Commandnoun

power of control, direction or disposal; mastery.

‘he had command of the situation’; ‘England has long held command of the sea’; ‘a good command of language’;

Imperativeadjective

(computing theory) Having semantics that incorporates mutable variables.

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Commandnoun

A position of chief authority; a position involving the right or power to order or control.

‘General Smith was placed in command.’;

Imperativeadjective

Expressing a command; authoritatively or absolutely directive.

‘imperative orders’;

Commandnoun

The act of commanding; exercise or authority of influence.

Imperativenoun

The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.

‘The verbs in sentences like "Do it!" and "Say what you like!" are in the imperative.’;

Commandnoun

(military) A body or troops, or any naval or military force, under the control of a particular officer; by extension, any object or body in someone's charge.

Imperativenoun

A verb in imperative mood.

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Commandnoun

Dominating situation; range or control or oversight; extent of view or outlook.

Imperativenoun

(countable) An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.

‘Visiting Berlin is an imperative.’;

Commandnoun

(computing) A directive to a computer program acting as an interpreter of some kind, in order to perform a specific task.

Imperativeadjective

Expressive of command; containing positive command; authoritatively or absolutely directive; commanding; authoritative; as, imperative orders.

‘The suit of kings are imperative.’;

Commandnoun

(baseball) The degree of control a pitcher has over his pitches.

‘He's got good command tonight.’;

Imperativeadjective

Not to be avoided or evaded; obligatory; binding; compulsory; as, an imperative duty or order.

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Commandverb

(transitive) To order, give orders; to compel or direct with authority.

‘The soldier was commanded to cease firing.’; ‘The king commanded his servant to bring him dinner.’;

Imperativeadjective

Expressive of commund, entreaty, advice, or exhortation; as, the imperative mood.

Commandverb

(transitive) To have or exercise supreme power, control or authority over, especially military; to have under direction or control.

‘to command an army or a ship’;

Imperativenoun

The imperative mood; also, a verb in the imperative mood.

Commandverb

(transitive) To require with authority; to demand, order, enjoin.

‘he commanded silence’; ‘If thou be the son of God, command that these stones be made bread. (Mat. IV. 3.)’;

Imperativenoun

a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior

Commandverb

(transitive) to dominate through ability, resources, position etc.; to overlook.

‘Bridges commanded by a fortified house. (Motley.)’;

Imperativenoun

some duty that is essential and urgent

Commandverb

(transitive) To exact, compel or secure by influence; to deserve, claim.

‘A good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.’; ‘Justice commands the respect and affections of the people.’; ‘The best goods command the best price.’; ‘This job commands a salary of £30,000.’;

Imperativeadjective

requiring attention or action;

‘as nuclear weapons proliferate, preventing war becomes imperative’; ‘requests that grew more and more imperative’;

Commandverb

(transitive) To hold, to control the use of.

‘The fort commanded the bay.’;

Imperativeadjective

relating to verbs in the imperative mood

Commandverb

To have a view, as from a superior position.

Commandverb

(obsolete) To direct to come; to bestow.

Commandverb

To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to direct; to bid; to charge.

‘We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you never read that we are commanded to forgive our friends.’; ‘Go to your mistress:Say, I command her come to me.’;

Commandverb

To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to have at one's disposal; to lead.

‘Monmouth commanded the English auxiliaries.’; ‘Such aid as I can spare you shall command.’;

Commandverb

To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.

‘Bridges commanded by a fortified house.’; ‘Up to the eastern tower,Whose height commands as subject all the vale.’; ‘One side commands a view of the finest garden.’;

Commandverb

To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price.

‘'Tis not in mortals to command success.’;

Commandverb

To direct to come; to bestow.

‘I will command my blessing upon you.’;

Commandverb

To have or to exercise direct authority; to govern; to sway; to influence; to give an order or orders.

‘And reigned, commanding in his monarchy.’; ‘For the king had so commanded concerning [Haman].’;

Commandverb

To have a view, as from a superior position.

‘Far and wide his eye commands.’;

Commandnoun

An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction.

‘Awaiting what command their mighty chiefHad to impose.’;

Commandnoun

The possession or exercise of authority.

‘Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.’;

Commandnoun

Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command.

Commandnoun

Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey.

‘The steepy standWhich overlooks the vale with wide command.’;

Commandnoun

Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge.

‘He assumed an absolute command over his readers.’;

Commandnoun

A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer.

Commandnoun

an authoritative direction or instruction to do something

Commandnoun

a military unit or region under the control of a single officer

Commandnoun

the power or authority to command;

‘an admiral in command’;

Commandnoun

availability for use;

‘the materials at the command of the potters grew’;

Commandnoun

a position of highest authority;

‘the corporation has just undergone a change in command’;

Commandnoun

great skillfulness and knowledge of some subject or activity;

‘a good command of French’;

Commandnoun

(computer science) a line of code written as part of a computer program

Commandverb

be in command of;

‘The general commanded a huge army’;

Commandverb

make someone do something

Commandverb

demand as one's due;

‘This speaker commands a high fee’; ‘The author commands a fair hearing from his readers’;

Commandverb

look down on;

‘The villa dominates the town’;

Commandverb

exercise authoritative control or power over;

‘control the budget’; ‘Command the military forces’;

Commandverb

give an authoritative or peremptory order

‘‘Stop arguing!’ he commanded’; ‘my mother commands my presence’; ‘he commanded that work should cease’; ‘a gruff voice commanded us to enter’;

Commandverb

have authority over; be in charge of (a unit)

‘he commanded a Hurricane squadron’;

Commandverb

control or restrain (oneself or one's feelings)

‘he commanded himself with an effort’;

Commandverb

dominate (a strategic position) from a superior height

‘the fortress commands the shortest Channel crossing’;

Commandverb

be in a strong enough position to have or secure

‘they command a majority in Parliament’; ‘he commanded considerable personal loyalty’;

Commandnoun

an authoritative order

‘he obeyed her commands without question’;

Commandnoun

authority, especially over armed forces

‘who's in command?’; ‘an officer took command’;

Commandnoun

a group of officers exercising control over a particular group or operation

‘a five-member general command’;

Commandnoun

a body of troops or a district under the control of a particular officer.

Commandnoun

the ability to use or control something

‘he had a brilliant command of English’;

Commandnoun

an instruction or signal causing a computer to perform one of its basic functions.

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