VS.

Comes vs. Come

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Comesnoun

(music) The answer to the theme, or dux, in a fugue.

Comeverb

(intransitive) To move from further away to nearer to.

‘She’ll be coming ’round the mountain when she comes...’;

Comesnoun

The answer to the theme (dux) in a fugue.

Comeverb

To move towards the speaker.

‘I called the dog, but she wouldn't come.’; ‘Stop dawdling and come here!’;

Comes

Comes ( KOH-meez), plural comites ( KOM-i-teez), is the Latin word for , either individually or as a member of a collective denominated a , especially the suite of a magnate, being in some instances sufficiently large and/or formal to justify specific denomination, e.g. a .

‘companion’; ‘comitatus’; ‘cohors amicorum’;

Comeverb

To move towards the listener.

‘Hold on, I'll come in a second.’; ‘You should ask the doctor to come to your house.’;

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Comeverb

To move towards the object that is the focus of the sentence.

‘No-one can find Bertie Wooster when his aunts come to visit.’; ‘Hundreds of thousands of people come to Disneyland every year.’;

Comeverb

(in subordinate clauses and gerunds) To move towards the agent or subject of the main clause.

‘King Cnut couldn't stop the tide coming.’; ‘He threw the boomerang, which came right back to him.’;

Comeverb

To move towards an unstated agent.

‘The butler should come when called.’;

Comeverb

(intransitive) To arrive.

Comeverb

(intransitive) To appear, to manifest itself.

‘The pain in his leg comes and goes.’;

Comeverb

(intransitive) To take a position relative to something else in a sequence.

‘Which letter comes before Y?’; ‘Winter comes after autumn.’;

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Comeverb

To achieve orgasm; to cum; to ejaculate.

‘He came after a few minutes.’;

Comeverb

To approach a state of being or accomplishment.

‘They came very close to leaving on time.’; ‘His test scores came close to perfect.’; ‘One of the screws came loose, and the skateboard fell apart.’;

Comeverb

To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.

‘He came to SF literature a confirmed technophile, and nothing made him happier than to read a manuscript thick with imaginary gizmos and whatzits.’;

Comeverb

To become, to turn out to be.

‘He was a dream come true.’;

Comeverb

(intransitive) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.

‘He's as tough as they come.’; ‘Our milkshakes come in vanilla, strawberry and chocolate flavours.’;

Comeverb

(slang) To carry through; to succeed in.

‘You can't come any tricks here.’;

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Comeverb

(intransitive) Happen.

‘This kind of accident comes when you are careless.’;

Comeverb

To have as an origin, originate.

Comeverb

To have a certain social background.

Comeverb

To be or have been a resident or native.

‘Where did you come from?’;

Comeverb

To have been brought up by or employed by.

‘She comes from a good family.’; ‘He comes from a disreputable legal firm.’;

Comeverb

To begin (at a certain location); to radiate or stem (from).

‘The river comes from Bear Lake.’; ‘Where does this road come from?’;

Comeverb

To germinate.

Comenoun

(obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.

Comenoun

Semen

Comenoun

Female ejaculatory discharge.

Comenoun

alternative form of commain its medieval use as a middot ⟨·⟩ serving as a form of colon.

Comepreposition

Used to indicate an event, period, or change in state occurring after a present time.

‘Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoction to offer your guests.’; ‘Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.’;

Comeinterjection

An exclamation to express annoyance.

‘Come come! Stop crying.’; ‘Come now! You must eat it.’;

Comeinterjection

An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.

‘Come come! You can do it.’; ‘Come now! It won't bite you.’;

Comeverb

To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker, or some place or person indicated; - opposed to go.

‘Look, who comes yonder?’; ‘I did not come to curse thee.’;

Comeverb

To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

‘When we came to Rome.’; ‘Lately come from Italy.’;

Comeverb

To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or from a distance.

‘The hour is coming, and now is.’; ‘So quick bright things come to confusion.’;

Comeverb

To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the act of another.

‘From whence come wars?’; ‘Both riches and honor come of thee !’;

Comeverb

To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear.

‘Then butter does refuse to come.’;

Comeverb

To get to be, as the result of change or progress; - with a predicate; as, to come untied.

‘How come you thus estranged?’; ‘How come her eyes so bright?’; ‘Think not that I am come to destroy.’; ‘We are come off like Romans.’; ‘The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year.’; ‘They were criedIn meeting, come next Sunday.’; ‘On better thoughts, and my urged reasons,They are come about, and won to the true side.’;

Comeverb

To carry through; to succeed in; as, you can't come any tricks here.

Comenoun

Coming.

Comeverb

move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody;

‘He came singing down the road’; ‘Come with me to the Casbah’; ‘come down here!’; ‘come out of the closet!’; ‘come into the room’;

Comeverb

reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress;

‘She arrived home at 7 o'clock’; ‘She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight’;

Comeverb

come to pass; arrive, as in due course;

‘The first success came three days later’; ‘It came as a shock’; ‘Dawn comes early in June’;

Comeverb

reach a state, relation, or condition;

‘The water came to a boil’; ‘We came to understand the true meaning of life’; ‘Their anger came to a boil’; ‘I came to realize the true meaning of life’;

Comeverb

to be the product or result;

‘Melons come from a vine’; ‘Understanding comes from experience’;

Comeverb

enter or assume a condition, relation, use, or position;

‘He came into contact with a terrorist group’; ‘The shoes came untied’; ‘I came to see his point of view’; ‘her face went red with anger’; ‘The knot came loose’; ‘Your wish will come true’;

Comeverb

be found or available;

‘These shoes come in three colors; The furniture comes unassembled’;

Comeverb

come forth;

‘A scream came from the woman's mouth’; ‘His breath came hard’;

Comeverb

be a native of;

‘She hails from Kalamazoo’;

Comeverb

extend or reach;

‘The water came up to my waist’; ‘The sleeves come to your knuckles’;

Comeverb

exist or occur in a certain point in a series;

‘Next came the student from France’;

Comeverb

come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for example;

‘She was descended from an old Italian noble family’; ‘he comes from humble origins’;

Comeverb

cover a certain distance;

‘She came a long way’;

Comeverb

come under, be classified or included;

‘fall into a category’; ‘This comes under a new heading’;

Comeverb

happen as a result;

‘Nothing good will come of this’;

Comeverb

add up in number or quantity;

‘The bills amounted to $2,000’; ‘The bill came to $2,000’;

Comeverb

develop into;

‘This idea will never amount to anything’; ‘nothing came of his grandiose plans’;

Comeverb

be received;

‘News came in of the massacre in Rwanda’;

Comeverb

come to one's mind; suggest itself;

‘It occurred to me that we should hire another secretary’; ‘A great idea then came to her’;

Comeverb

proceed or get along;

‘How is she doing in her new job?’; ‘How are you making out in graduate school?’; ‘He's come a long way’;

Comeverb

experience orgasm;

‘she could not come because she was too upset’;

Comeverb

have a certain priority;

‘My family comes first’;

Comeverb

move or travel towards or into a place thought of as near or familiar to the speaker

‘Jess came into the kitchen’; ‘he came rushing out’; ‘I came here on holiday with my parents’;

Comeverb

arrive at a specified place

‘we walked along till we came to a stream’; ‘my trunk hasn't come yet’; ‘it was very late when she came back’;

Comeverb

(of a thing) reach or extend to a specified point

‘the path comes straight down’; ‘women in slim dresses that came all the way to their shoes’;

Comeverb

approach

‘she heard the train coming’; ‘someone was coming’;

Comeverb

travel in order to be with a specified person, to do a specified thing, or to be present at an event

‘the police came’; ‘the electrician came to mend the cooker’; ‘we have come a long way since Aristotle’; ‘come and live with me’;

Comeverb

join someone in participating in a specified activity or course of action

‘do you want to come fishing tomorrow?’;

Comeverb

make progress; develop

‘she asked them how their garden was coming on’; ‘he's coming along nicely’;

Comeverb

said to someone when correcting or reassuring someone

‘Come, come, child, don't thank me’;

Comeverb

occur; happen; take place

‘his father waited for a phone call that never came’; ‘twilight had not yet come’; ‘a chance like this doesn't come along every day’;

Comeverb

be heard, perceived, or experienced

‘a voice came from the kitchen’; ‘it came as a great shock’;

Comeverb

(of a quality) become apparent or noticeable through actions or performance

‘as an actor your style and personality must come through’;

Comeverb

(of a person) appear or sound in a specified way; give a specified impression

‘he'd always come across as a decent sort’;

Comeverb

(of a thought or memory) enter one's mind

‘the basic idea came to me while reading an article’; ‘a passage from a novel came back to Adam’;

Comeverb

take or occupy a specified position in space, order, or priority

‘prisons come well down the list of priorities’; ‘I make sure my kids come first’;

Comeverb

achieve a specified place in a race or contest

‘she came second among sixty contestants’;

Comeverb

pass into a specified state, especially one of separation or disunion

‘his shirt had come undone’;

Comeverb

reach or be brought to a specified situation or result

‘you will come to no harm’; ‘staff who come into contact with the public’; ‘the vehicle came to rest against a traffic signal’;

Comeverb

eventually reach a certain condition or state of mind

‘he had come to realize she was no puppet’;

Comeverb

be sold, available, or found in a specified form

‘the shirts come in three sizes’; ‘the cars come with a variety of extras’;

Comeverb

have an orgasm.

Comepreposition

when a specified time is reached or event happens

‘I don't think that they'll be far away from honours come the new season’;

Comenoun

semen ejaculated at an orgasm.

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