VS.

Colloquialism vs. Idiom

Published:
Views: 9,920

Colloquialismnoun

A colloquial word or phrase; a common spoken expression, often regional.

Idiomnoun

A manner of speaking, a mode of expression peculiar to a language, person, or group of people.

Colloquialismnoun

A colloquial expression, not employed in formal discourse or writing.

Idiomnoun

A language or language variety; specifically, a restricted dialect used in a given historical period, context etc.

Colloquialismnoun

a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech

Idiomnoun

An established expression whose meaning is not deducible from the literal meanings of its component words, often peculiar to a given language.

ADVERTISEMENT

Colloquialismnoun

a word or phrase that is not formal or literary and is used in ordinary or familiar conversation

‘the colloquialisms of the streets’;

Idiomnoun

An artistic style (for example, in art, architecture, or music); an instance of such a style.

Colloquialismnoun

the use of colloquialisms

‘speech allows for colloquialism and slang’;

Idiomnoun

(programming) A programming construct or phraseology that is characteristic of the language.

Colloquialism

Colloquialism or colloquial language is the linguistic style used for casual communication. It is the most common functional style of speech, the idiom normally employed in conversation and other informal contexts.

Idiomnoun

The syntactical or structural form peculiar to any language; the genius or cast of a language.

‘Idiom may be employed loosely and figuratively as a synonym of language or dialect, but in its proper sense it signifies the totality of the general rules of construction which characterize the syntax of a particular language and distinguish it from other tongues.’; ‘By idiom is meant the use of words which is peculiar to a particular language.’; ‘He followed their language [the Latin], but did not comply with the idiom of ours.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Idiomnoun

An expression conforming or appropriate to the peculiar structural form of a language.

‘Some that with care true eloquence shall teach,And to just idioms fix our doubtful speech.’;

Idiomnoun

A combination of words having a meaning peculiar to itself and not predictable as a combination of the meanings of the individual words, but sanctioned by usage; as, an idiomatic expression; less commonly, a single word used in a peculiar sense.

‘It is not by means of rules that such idioms as the following are made current: "I can make nothing of it." "He treats his subject home." Dryden. "It is that within us that makes for righteousness." M. Arnold.’; ‘Sometimes we identify the words with the object - though by courtesy of idiom rather than in strict propriety of language.’;

Idiomnoun

The phrase forms peculiar to a particular author; as, written in his own idiom.

‘Every good writer has much idiom.’;

Idiomnoun

Dialect; a variant form of a language.

Idiomnoun

a manner of speaking that is natural to native speakers of a language

Idiomnoun

the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people;

‘the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English’; ‘he has a strong German accent’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Idiomnoun

the style of a particular artist or school or movement;

‘an imaginative orchestral idiom’;

Idiomnoun

an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up

Idiomnoun

a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the moon, see the light).

Idiomnoun

a form of expression natural to a language, person, or group of people

‘he had a feeling for phrase and idiom’;

Idiomnoun

the dialect of a people or part of a country.

Idiomnoun

a characteristic mode of expression in music or art

‘they were both working in a neo-impressionist idiom’;

Idiom

An idiom is a phrase or expression that typically presents a figurative, non-literal meaning attached to the phrase; but some phrases become figurative idioms while retaining the literal meaning of the phrase. Categorized as formulaic language, an idiom's figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons