VS.

Coarse vs. Fine

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Coarseadjective

Composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

Fineadjective

Senses referring to subjective quality.

Coarseadjective

Lacking refinement, taste or delicacy

‘coarse manners’; ‘coarse language’;

Fineadjective

Of superior quality.

‘The tree frog that they encountered was truly a fine specimen.’; ‘Only a really fine wine could fully complement Lucía's hand-made pasta.’;

Coarseadjective

Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; - opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse bread.

Fineadjective

(informal) Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.

‘How are you today? – Fine.’; ‘Will this one do? It's got a dent in it. – Yeah, it'll be fine, I guess.’; ‘It's fine with me if you stay out late, so long as you're back by three.’;

Coarseadjective

Not refined; rough; rude; unpolished; gross; indelicate; as, coarse manners; coarse language.

‘I feelOf what coarse metal ye are molded.’; ‘To copy, in my coarse English, his beautiful expressions.’;

Fineadjective

(informal) Good-looking, attractive.

‘That man is so fine that I'd jump into his pants without a moment's hesitation.’;

Coarseadjective

of texture; large-grained or rough to the touch;

‘coarse meal’; ‘coarse sand’; ‘a coarse weave’;

Fineadjective

Subtle, delicately balanced or discriminated.

Coarseadjective

lacking refinement or cultivation or taste;

‘he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind’; ‘behavior that branded him as common’; ‘an untutored and uncouth human being’; ‘an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy’; ‘appealing to the vulgar taste for violence’; ‘the vulgar display of the newly rich’;

Fineadjective

(obsolete) Showy; overdecorated.

Coarseadjective

of low or inferior quality or value;

‘of what coarse metal ye are molded’; ‘produced...the common cloths used by the poorer population’;

Fineadjective

Delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; dexterous.

Coarseadjective

conspicuously and tastelessly indecent;

‘coarse language’; ‘a crude joke’; ‘crude behavior’; ‘an earthy sense of humor’; ‘a revoltingly gross expletive’; ‘a vulgar gesture’; ‘full of language so vulgar it should have been edited’;

Fineadjective

An answer often used to cover an unnecessary explanation, rather to avoid conflict or an argument. Saying "I'm fine" can be used to avoid inquiry when the speaker is not really okay.

‘When a girl says she's "fine," she ain't fine.’;

Coarseadjective

rough or harsh in texture

‘a coarse woollen cloth’;

Fineadjective

Senses referring to objective quality.

Coarseadjective

consisting of large grains or particles

‘coarse sand’;

Fineadjective

Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.

‘The small scratch meant that his copy of “X-Men #2” was merely fine when it otherwise would have been “near mint”.’;

Coarseadjective

(of grains or particles) large

‘under the microscope they are seen to contain coarse grains’;

Fineadjective

(of weather) Sunny and not raining.

Coarseadjective

(of a person's features) not elegantly formed or proportioned

‘his coarse, ugly features contorted with rage’;

Fineadjective

Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.

‘Grind it into a fine powder.’; ‘When she touched the artifact, it collapsed into a heap of fine dust.’;

Coarseadjective

(of food or drink) of inferior quality

‘the wine is harsh, tannic, and coarse’;

Fineadjective

Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.

‘The threads were so fine that you had to look through a magnifying glass to see them.’;

Coarseadjective

(of a person or their speech) rude or vulgar

‘a man of coarse speech’; ‘indecent language and coarse jests’;

Fineadjective

Made of slender or thin filaments.

‘They protected themselves from the small parasites with a fine wire mesh.’;

Coarseadjective

relating to the sport of angling for coarse fish

‘coarse anglers’;

Fineadjective

Having a (specified) proportion of pure metal in its composition.

‘coins nine tenths fine’;

Fineadjective

(cricket) Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.

‘...to nudge it through the covers (or tickle it down to fine leg) for a fournb...’;

Fineadjective

(obsolete) Subtle; thin; tenuous.

Fineadverb

Expression of (typically) reluctant agreement.

Fineadverb

Well, nicely, in a positive way.

‘Everything worked out fine.’;

Fineadverb

Finely; elegantly; delicately.

Fineadverb

In a manner so that the driven ball strikes the object ball so far to one side as to be barely deflected, the object ball being driven to one side.

Finenoun

Fine champagne; French brandy.

Finenoun

Something that is fine; fine particles.

‘They filtered silt and fines out of the soil.’;

Finenoun

A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.

‘The fine for jay-walking has gone from two dollars to thirty in the last fifteen years.’;

Finenoun

(music) The end of a musical composition.

Finenoun

(music) The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.

Finenoun

(obsolete) End; conclusion; termination; extinction.

Finenoun

A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.

Finenoun

A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.

Fineverb

(transitive) To make finer, purer, or cleaner; to purify or clarify.

‘to fine gold’;

Fineverb

(intransitive) To become finer, purer, or cleaner.

Fineverb

To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.

‘to fine the soil’;

Fineverb

To change by fine gradations.

‘to fine down a ship's lines, i.e. to diminish her lines gradually’;

Fineverb

(transitive) To clarify (wine and beer) by filtration.

Fineverb

To become gradually fine; to diminish; to dwindle (with away, down, or off).

Fineverb

(transitive) To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).

‘She was fined a thousand dollars for littering, but she appealed.’;

Fineverb

(intransitive) To pay a fine.

Fineverb

To finish; to cease.

Fineverb

To cause to cease; to stop.

Fineadjective

Finished; brought to perfection; refined; hence, free from impurity; excellent; superior; elegant; worthy of admiration; accomplished; beautiful.

‘The gain thereof [is better] than fine gold.’; ‘A cup of wine that's brisk and fine.’; ‘Not only the finest gentleman of his time, but one of the finest scholars.’; ‘To soothe the sick bed of so fine a being [Keats].’;

Fineadjective

Aiming at show or effect; loaded with ornament; overdressed or overdecorated; showy.

‘He gratified them with occasional . . . fine writing.’;

Fineadjective

Nice; delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; skillful; dexterous.

‘The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine!’; ‘The nicest and most delicate touches of satire consist in fine raillery.’; ‘He has as fine a hand at picking a pocket as a woman.’;

Fineadjective

Not coarse, gross, or heavy

‘The eye standeth in the finer medium and the object in the grosser.’;

Fineadjective

Not coarse; comminuted; in small particles; as, fine sand or flour.

Fineadjective

Having (such) a proportion of pure metal in its composition; as, coins nine tenths fine.

Fineadjective

Used ironically.

‘Ye have made a fine hand, fellows.’;

Fineverb

To make fine; to refine; to purify, to clarify; as, to fine gold.

‘It hath been fined and refined by . . . learned men.’;

Fineverb

To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.; as. to fine the soil.

Fineverb

To change by fine gradations; as (Naut.), to fine down a ship's lines, to diminish her lines gradually.

‘I often sate at homeOn evenings, watching how they fined themselvesWith gradual conscience to a perfect night.’;

Fineverb

To impose a pecuniary penalty upon for an offense or breach of law; to set a fine on by judgment of a court; to punish by fine; to mulct; as, the trespassers were fined ten dollars.

Fineverb

To pay a fine. See Fine, n., 3 (b).

‘Men fined for the king's good will; or that he would remit his anger; women fined for leave to marry.’;

Fineverb

To finish; to cease; or to cause to cease.

Fineverb

To become fine (in any one of various senses); as, the ale will fine; the weather fined.

‘I watched her [the ship] . . . gradually fining down in the westward until I lost of her hull.’;

Finenoun

End; conclusion; termination; extinction.

‘Is this the fine of his fines?’;

Finenoun

A sum of money paid as the settlement of a claim, or by way of terminating a matter in dispute; especially, a payment of money imposed upon a party as a punishment for an offense; a mulct.

Finenoun

A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.

Finenoun

A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.

Fineadverb

Finely; well; elegantly; fully; delicately; mincingly.

Fineadverb

In a manner so that the driven ball strikes the object ball so far to one side as to be deflected but little, the object ball being driven to one side.

Finenoun

money extracted as a penalty

Fineverb

issue a ticket or a fine to as a penalty;

‘I was fined for parking on the wrong side of the street’; ‘Move your car or else you will be ticketed!’;

Fineadjective

superior to the average;

‘in fine spirits’; ‘a fine student’; ‘made good grades’; ‘morale was good’; ‘had good weather for the parade’;

Fineadjective

being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition;

‘an all-right movie’; ‘the passengers were shaken up but are all right’; ‘is everything all right?’; ‘everything's fine’; ‘things are okay’; ‘dinner and the movies had been fine’; ‘another minute I'd have been fine’;

Fineadjective

minutely precise especially in differences in meaning;

‘a fine distinction’;

Fineadjective

of texture; being small-grained or smooth to the touch or having fine particles;

‘wood with a fine grain’; ‘fine powdery snow’; ‘fine rain’; ‘batiste is a cotton fabric with a fine weave’; ‘covered with a fine film of dust’;

Fineadjective

being in good health;

‘he's feeling all right again’; ‘I'm fine, how are you?’;

Fineadjective

thin in thickness or diameter;

‘a fine film of oil’; ‘fine hairs’; ‘read the fine print’;

Fineadjective

characterized by elegance or refinement or accomplishment;

‘fine wine’; ‘looking fine in her Easter suit’; ‘a fine gentleman’; ‘fine china and crystal’; ‘a fine violinist’; ‘the fine hand of a master’;

Fineadjective

; free or impurities; having a high or specified degree of purity;

‘gold 21 carats fine’;

Fineadjective

(of weather) pleasant; not raining, perhaps with the sun shining;

‘a fine summer evening’;

Fineadverb

sentence-initial expression of agreement

Fineadverb

in a delicate manner;

‘finely shaped features’; ‘her fine drawn body’;

Fineadverb

in a superior and skilled manner;

‘the soldiers were fighting finely’;

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