VS.

Climb vs. Slope

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Climbverb

(intransitive) To ascend; rise; to go up.

‘Prices climbed steeply.’;

Slopenoun

An area of ground that tends evenly upward or downward.

‘I had to climb a small slope to get to the site.’;

Climbverb

(transitive) To mount; to move upwards on.

‘They climbed the mountain.’; ‘Climbing a tree’;

Slopenoun

The degree to which a surface tends upward or downward.

‘The road has a very sharp downward slope at that point.’;

Climbverb

(transitive) To scale; to get to the top of something.

Slopenoun

(mathematics) The ratio of the vertical and horizontal distances between two points on a line; zero if the line is horizontal, undefined if it is vertical.

‘The slope of this line is 0.5’;

Climbverb

(transitive) To move (especially up and down something) by gripping with the hands and using the feet.

Slopenoun

(mathematics) The slope of the line tangent to a curve at a given point.

‘The slope of a parabola increases linearly with x.’;

Climbverb

(intransitive) to practise the sport of climbing

Slopenoun

The angle a roof surface makes with the horizontal, expressed as a ratio of the units of vertical rise to the units of horizontal length (sometimes referred to as run).

‘The slope of an asphalt shingle roof system should be 4:12 or greater.’;

Climbverb

(intransitive) to jump high

Slopenoun

A person of Chinese or other East Asian descent.

Climbverb

To move to a higher position on the social ladder.

Slopeverb

(intransitive) To tend steadily upward or downward.

‘The road slopes sharply down at that point.’;

Climbverb

(botany) Of plants, to grow upwards by clinging to something.

Slopeverb

(transitive) To form with a slope; to give an oblique or slanting direction to; to incline or slant.

‘to slope the ground in a garden;’; ‘to slope a piece of cloth in cutting a garment’;

Climbnoun

An act of climbing.

Slopeverb

To try to move surreptitiously.

‘I sloped in through the back door, hoping my boss wouldn't see me.’;

Climbnoun

The act of getting to somewhere more elevated.

Slopeverb

(military) To hold a rifle at a slope with forearm perpendicular to the body in front holding the butt, the rifle resting on the shoulder.

‘The order was given to "slope arms".’;

Climbnoun

An upwards struggle

Slopeadjective

(obsolete) Sloping.

Climbverb

To ascend or mount laboriously, esp. by use of the hands and feet.

Slopeadverb

(obsolete) slopingly

Climbverb

To ascend as if with effort; to rise to a higher point.

‘Black vapors climb aloft, and cloud the day.’;

Slopenoun

An oblique direction; a line or direction including from a horizontal line or direction; also, sometimes, an inclination, as of one line or surface to another.

Climbverb

To ascend or creep upward by twining about a support, or by attaching itself by tendrils, rootlets, etc., to a support or upright surface.

Slopenoun

Any ground whose surface forms an angle with the plane of the horizon.

‘buildings the summit and slope of a hill.’; ‘Under the slopes of Pisgah.’;

Climbverb

To ascend, as by means of the hands and feet, or laboriously or slowly; to mount.

Slopenoun

The part of a continent descending toward, and draining to, a particular ocean; as, the Pacific slope.

Climbnoun

The act of one who climbs; ascent by climbing.

Slopeadjective

Sloping.

‘A bank not steep, but gently slope.’;

Climbnoun

an upward slope or grade (as in a road);

‘the car couldn't make it up the rise’;

Slopeadverb

In a sloping manner.

Climbnoun

an event that involves rising to a higher point (as in altitude or temperature or intensity etc.)

Slopeverb

To form with a slope; to give an oblique or slanting direction to; to direct obliquely; to incline; to slant; as, to slope the ground in a garden; to slope a piece of cloth in cutting a garment.

Climbnoun

the act of climbing something;

‘it was a difficult climb to the top’;

Slopeverb

To take an oblique direction; to be at an angle with the plane of the horizon; to incline; as, the ground slopes.

Climbverb

go upward with gradual or continuous progress;

‘Did you ever climb up the hill behind your house?’;

Slopeverb

To depart; to disappear suddenly.

Climbverb

move with difficulty, by grasping

Slopenoun

an elevated geological formation;

‘he climbed the steep slope’; ‘the house was built on the side of the mountain’;

Climbverb

go up or advance;

‘Sales were climbing after prices were lowered’;

Slopenoun

the property possessed by a line or surface that departs from the horizontal;

‘a five-degree gradient’;

Climbverb

slope upward;

‘The path climbed all the way to the top of the hill’;

Slopeverb

be at an angle;

‘The terrain sloped down’;

Climbverb

improve one's social status;

‘This young man knows how to climb the social ladder’;

Slopenoun

a surface of which one end or side is at a higher level than another; a rising or falling surface

‘he slithered helplessly down the slope’;

Climbverb

increase in value or to a higher point;

‘prices climbed steeply’; ‘the value of our house rose sharply last year’;

Slopenoun

a difference in level or sideways position between the two ends or sides of a thing

‘the backward slope of the chair’; ‘the roof should have a slope sufficient for proper drainage’;

Slopenoun

a part of the side of a hill or mountain, especially as a place for skiing

‘a ten-minute cable car ride delivers you to the slopes’;

Slopenoun

the gradient of a graph at any point.

Slopenoun

the mutual conductance of a valve, numerically equal to the gradient of one of the characteristic curves of the valve.

Slopenoun

a person from East Asia, especially Vietnam.

Slopeverb

(of a surface or line) be inclined from a horizontal or vertical line; slant up or down

‘the garden sloped down to a stream’; ‘the ceiling sloped’;

Slopeverb

place or arrange in a sloping position

‘Poole sloped his shoulders’;

Slopeverb

move in an idle or aimless manner

‘I had seen Don sloping about the beach’;

Slopeverb

leave unobtrusively, typically in order to evade work or duty

‘the men sloped off looking ashamed of themselves’;

Slope

In mathematics, the slope or gradient of a line is a number that describes both the direction and the steepness of the line. Slope is often denoted by the letter m; there is no clear answer to the question why the letter m is used for slope, but its earliest use in English appears in O'Brien (1844) who wrote the equation of a straight line as and it can also be found in Todhunter (1888) who wrote it as .Slope is calculated by finding the ratio of the to the between (any) two distinct points on a line.

‘y = mx + b’; ‘y = mx + c’; ‘vertical change’; ‘horizontal change’;

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