VS.

Clew vs. Sail

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Clewnoun

(obsolete) A roughly spherical mass or body.

Sailnoun

(nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.

Clewnoun

(archaic) A ball of thread or yarn.

Sailnoun

(nautical,uncountable) The concept of a sail or sails, as if a substance.

‘Take in sail, a storm is coming.’;

Clewnoun

Yarn or thread as used to guide one's way through a maze or labyrinth; a guide, a clue.

Sailnoun

(uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use this power for travel or transport.

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Clewnoun

(nautical) The lower corner(s) of a sail to which a sheet is attached for trimming the sail (adjusting its position relative to the wind); the metal loop or cringle in the corner of the sail, to which the sheet is attached. (on a triangular sail) The trailing corner relative to the wind direction.

Sailnoun

A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.

‘Let's go for a sail.’;

Clewnoun

(in the plural) The sheets so attached to a sail.

Sailnoun

(dated) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Plural sail.

‘Twenty sail were in sight.’;

Clewnoun

The cords suspending a hammock.

Sailnoun

The blade of a windmill.

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Clewverb

(transitive) to roll into a ball

Sailnoun

A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.

Clewverb

(nautical) (transitive and intransitive) to raise the lower corner(s) of (a sail)

Sailnoun

The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.

Clewnoun

A ball of thread, yarn, or cord; also, The thread itself.

‘Untwisting his deceitful clew.’;

Sailnoun

(fishing) A sailfish.

‘We caught three sails today.’;

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Clewnoun

That which guides or directs one in anything of a doubtful or intricate nature; that which gives a hint in the solution of a mystery.

‘The clew, without which it was perilous to enter the vast and intricate maze of countinental politics, was in his hands.’;

Sailnoun

(paleontology) an outward projection of the spine, occurring in certain dinosaurs and synapsids

Clewnoun

A lower corner of a square sail, or the after corner of a fore-and-aft sail.

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.

Clewverb

To direct; to guide, as by a thread.

‘Direct and clew me out the way to happiness.’;

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.

Clewverb

To move of draw (a sail or yard) by means of the clew garnets, clew lines, etc.; esp. to draw up the clews of a square sail to the yard.

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.

Clewnoun

a ball of yarn or cord or thread

Sailverb

To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.

Clewnoun

evidence that helps to solve a problem

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

‘We sail for Australia tomorrow.’;

Clewverb

roll into a ball

Sailverb

To move briskly and gracefully through the air.

Sailverb

To move briskly.

‘The duchess sailed haughtily out of the room.’;

Sailnoun

An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.

‘Behoves him now both sail and oar.’;

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.

Sailnoun

A wing; a van.

‘Like an eagle soaringTo weather his broad sails.’;

Sailnoun

The extended surface of the arm of a windmill.

Sailnoun

A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.

Sailnoun

A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water.

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power.

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl.

Sailverb

To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton.

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

Sailverb

To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird.

‘As is a winged messenger of heaven, . . .When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds,And sails upon the bosom of the air.’;

Sailverb

To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force.

‘A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea.’;

Sailverb

To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.

‘Sublime she sailsThe aërial space, and mounts the wingèd gales.’;

Sailverb

To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship.

Sailnoun

a large piece of fabric (as canvas) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel

Sailnoun

an ocean trip taken for pleasure

Sailverb

traverse or travel by ship on (a body of water);

‘We sailed the Atlantic’; ‘He sailed the Pacific all alone’;

Sailverb

move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions;

‘The diva swept into the room’; ‘Shreds of paper sailed through the air’; ‘The searchlights swept across the sky’;

Sailverb

travel in a boat propelled by wind;

‘I love sailing, especially on the open sea’;

Sailverb

travel by boat on a boat propelled by wind or by other means;

‘The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow’;

Sailnoun

a piece of material extended on a mast to catch the wind and propel a boat or ship or other vessel

‘all the sails were unfurled’; ‘the boat can no longer carry that area of sail’;

Sailnoun

the use of sailing ships as a means of transport

‘this led to bigger ships as steam replaced sail’;

Sailnoun

a sailing ship

‘sail ahoy!’;

Sailnoun

a wind-catching apparatus attached to the arm of a windmill.

Sailnoun

the broad fin on the back of a sailfish or of some prehistoric reptiles.

Sailnoun

a structure by which an animal is propelled across the surface of water by the wind, e.g. the float of a Portuguese man-of-war.

Sailnoun

a voyage or excursion in a ship, especially a sailing ship or boat

‘they went for a sail’;

Sailnoun

the conning tower of a submarine.

Sailnoun

a canvas sheet or tarpaulin

‘the sail covering the load of crates broke loose from the truck’;

Sailverb

travel in a boat with sails, especially as a sport or recreation

‘Ian took us out sailing on the lake’;

Sailverb

travel in a ship or boat using sails or engine power

‘the ferry caught fire sailing between Caen and Portsmouth’;

Sailverb

begin a voyage; leave a harbour

‘the catamaran sails at 3:30’;

Sailverb

travel by ship on or across (a sea) or on (a route)

‘plastic ships could be sailing the oceans soon’;

Sailverb

navigate or control (a boat or ship)

‘I stole a small fishing boat and sailed it to the Delta’;

Sailverb

move smoothly and rapidly or in a stately or confident manner

‘the ball sailed inside the right-hand post’;

Sailverb

succeed easily at (something, especially a test or examination)

‘Ali sailed through his exams’;

Sailverb

attack physically or verbally with force.

Sail

A sail is a tensile structure—made from fabric or other membrane materials—that uses wind power to propel sailing craft, including sailing ships, sailboats, windsurfers, ice boats, and even sail-powered land vehicles. Sails may be made from a combination of woven materials—including canvas or polyester cloth, laminated membranes or bonded filaments—usually in a three- or four-sided shape.

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