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Clause vs. Predicate

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Clausenoun

(grammar) A verb, its necessary grammatical arguments, and any adjuncts affecting them.

Predicatenoun

(grammar) The part of the sentence (or clause) which states something about the subject or the object of the sentence.

‘In "The dog barked very loudly", the subject is "the dog" and the predicate is "barked very loudly".’;

Clausenoun

(grammar) A verb along with its subject and their modifiers. If a clause provides a complete thought on its own, then it is an independent (superordinate) clause; otherwise, it is (subordinate) dependent.

Predicatenoun

(logic) A term of a statement, where the statement may be true or false depending on whether the thing referred to by the values of the statement's variables has the property signified by that (predicative) term.

‘A nullary predicate is a proposition.’; ‘A predicate is either valid, satisfiable, or unsatisfiable.’;

Clausenoun

(legal) A separate part of a contract, a will or another legal document.

Predicatenoun

(computing) An operator or function that returns either true or false.

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Clauseverb

To amend (a bill of lading or similar document).

Predicateadjective

(grammar) Of or related to the predicate of a sentence or clause.

Clausenoun

A separate portion of a written paper, paragraph, or sentence; an article, stipulation, or proviso, in a legal document.

‘The usual attestation clause to a will.’;

Predicateadjective

Predicated, stated.

Clausenoun

A subordinate portion or a subdivision of a sentence containing a subject and its predicate.

Predicateadjective

(law) Relating to or being any of a series of criminal acts upon which prosecution for racketeering may be predicated.

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Clausenoun

See Letters clause or Letters close, under Letter.

Predicateverb

(transitive) To announce, assert, or proclaim publicly.

Clausenoun

(grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence

Predicateverb

(transitive) To assume or suppose; to infer.

Clausenoun

a separate section of a legal document (as a statute or contract or will)

Predicateverb

to base (on); to assert on the grounds of.

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Clause

In language, a clause is a constituent that links a semantic predicand (expressed or not) and a semantic predicate. A typical clause consists of a subject and a syntactic predicate, the latter typically a verb phrase, a verb with any objects and other modifiers.

Predicateverb

To make a term (or expression) the predicate of a statement.

Predicateverb

To assert or state as an attribute or quality of something.

Predicateverb

To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow.

Predicateverb

To found; to base.

Predicateverb

To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation.

Predicatenoun

That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, "Paper is white," "Ink is not white," whiteness is the predicate affirmed of paper and denied of ink.

Predicatenoun

The word or words in a proposition which express what is affirmed of the subject.

Predicateadjective

Predicated.

Predicatenoun

(logic) what is predicated of the subject of a proposition; the second term in a proposition is predicated of the first term by means of the copula;

‘`Socrates is a man' predicates manhood of Socrates’;

Predicatenoun

one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the predicate contains the verb and its complements

Predicateverb

make the (grammatical) predicate in a proposition;

‘The predicate `dog' is predicated of the subject `Fido' in the sentence `Fido is a dog'’;

Predicateverb

affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of;

‘The speech predicated the fitness of the candidate to be President’;

Predicateverb

involve as a necessary condition of consequence; as in logic;

‘solving the problem is predicated on understanding it well’;

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