VS.

Clash vs. Dash

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Clashnoun

(onomatopoeia) A loud sound, like the crashing together of metal objects.

‘I heard a clash from the kitchen, and rushed in to find the cat had knocked over some pots and pans.’;

Dashnoun

(typography) Any of the following symbols: ‒ (figure dash), – (en dash), — (em dash), or ― (horizontal bar).

Clashnoun

(military) A skirmish, a hostile encounter.

Dashnoun

(colloquial) A hyphen or minus sign.

Clashnoun

(sports) a match; a game between two sides.

Dashnoun

(by extension) The longer of the two symbols of Morse code.

Clashnoun

An angry argument

Dashnoun

A short run, flight.

‘When the feds came they did the dash.’;

Clashnoun

Opposition; contradiction; such as between differing or contending interests, views, purposes etc.

‘a clash of beliefs’; ‘a personality clash’;

Dashnoun

A rushing or violent onset.

Clashnoun

A combination of garments that do not look good together, especially because of conflicting colours.

‘She was wearing a horrible clash of red and orange.’;

Dashnoun

Violent strike; a whack.

Clashnoun

(hurling) An instance of restarting the game after a "dead ball", where it is dropped between two opposing players, who can fight for possession.

Dashnoun

A small quantity of a liquid substance etc.; less than 1/8 of a teaspoon.

‘Add a dash of vinegar.’;

Clashnoun

(Scotland) Chatter; gossip; idle talk.

Dashnoun

A slight admixture.

‘There is a dash of craziness in his personality.’;

Clashverb

(intransitive) To make a clashing sound.

‘The cymbals clashed.’;

Dashnoun

Ostentatious vigor.

‘Aren't we full of dash this morning?’;

Clashverb

(transitive) To cause to make a clashing sound.

Dashnoun

A dashboard.

Clashverb

To come into violent conflict.

‘Fans from opposing teams clashed on the streets after the game.’;

Dashnoun

A bribe or gratuity; a gift

Clashverb

(intransitive) To argue angrily.

‘My parents often clashed about minor things, such as the cleaning or shopping rota.’;

Dashnoun

A stand-in for a censored word, like "Devil" or "damn". (Compare deuce.)

Clashverb

To face each other in an important game.

Dashverb

(intransitive) To run quickly or for a short distance.

‘He dashed across the field.’;

Clashverb

To fail to look good together; to contrast unattractively; to fail to harmonize.

‘You can't wear that shirt! It clashes with your trousers.’; ‘The hotel room was ugly, and the wallpaper clashed with the carpet.’;

Dashverb

To leave or depart.

‘I have to dash now. See you soon.’;

Clashverb

To coincide, to happen at the same time, thereby rendering it impossible to attend all.

‘I can't come to your wedding because it clashes with a friend's funeral.’; ‘I wanted to take German, but it clashed with art on the timetable.’;

Dashverb

(transitive) To destroy by striking (against).

‘He dashed the bottle against the bar and turned about to fight.’;

Clashverb

To chatter or gossip.

Dashverb

(transitive) To throw violently.

‘The man was dashed from the vehicle during the accident.’;

Clashverb

To make a noise by striking against something; to dash noisily together.

Dashverb

To sprinkle; to splatter.

Clashverb

To meet in opposition; to act in a contrary direction; to come onto collision; to interfere.

‘However some of his interests might clash with those of the chief adjacent colony.’;

Dashverb

To mix, reduce, or adulterate, by throwing in something of an inferior quality.

‘to dash wine with water’;

Clashverb

To strike noisily against or together.

Dashverb

To ruin; to destroy.

‘Her hopes were dashed when she saw the damage.’;

Clashnoun

A loud noise resulting from collision; a noisy collision of bodies; a collision.

‘The roll of cannon and clash of arms.’;

Dashverb

(transitive) To dishearten; to sadden.

‘Her thoughts were dashed to melancholy.’;

Clashnoun

Opposition; contradiction; as between differing or contending interests, views, purposes, etc.

‘Clashes between popes and kings.’;

Dashverb

(transitive) To complete hastily, usually with down or off.

‘He dashed down his eggs, she dashed off her homework’;

Clashnoun

a loud resonant repeating noise;

‘he could hear the clang of distant bells’;

Dashverb

(transitive) To draw quickly; jot.

Clashnoun

a state of conflict between persons

Dashinterjection

(euphemistic) Damn!

Clashnoun

a state of conflict between colors;

‘her dress was a disturbing clash of colors’;

Dashverb

To throw with violence or haste; to cause to strike violently or hastily; - often used with against.

‘If you dash a stone against a stone in the botton of the water, it maketh a sound.’;

Clashnoun

a minor short-term fight

Dashverb

To break, as by throwing or by collision; to shatter; to crust; to frustrate; to ruin.

‘Thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.’; ‘A brave vessel, . . . Dashed all to pieces.’; ‘To perplex and dashMaturest counsels.’;

Clashverb

crash together with violent impact;

‘The cars collided’; ‘Two meteors clashed’;

Dashverb

To put to shame; to confound; to confuse; to abash; to depress.

‘Dash the proud gamester in his gilded car.’;

Clashverb

be incompatible; be or come into conflict;

‘These colors clash’;

Dashverb

To throw in or on in a rapid, careless manner; to mix, reduce, or adulterate, by throwing in something of an inferior quality; to overspread partially; to bespatter; to touch here and there; as, to dash wine with water; to dash paint upon a picture.

‘I take care to dash the character with such particular circumstance as may prevent ill-natured applications.’; ‘The very source and fount of dayIs dashed with wandering isles of night.’;

Clashverb

disagree violently;

‘We clashed over the new farm policies’;

Dashverb

To form or sketch rapidly or carelessly; to execute rapidly, or with careless haste; - with off; as, to dash off a review or sermon.

Dashverb

To erase by a stroke; to strike out; knock out; - with out; as, to dash out a word.

Dashverb

To rush with violence; to move impetuously; to strike violently; as, the waves dash upon rocks.

‘[He] dashed through thick and thin.’; ‘On each hand the gushing waters play,And down the rough cascade all dashing fall.’;

Dashnoun

Violent striking together of two bodies; collision; crash.

Dashnoun

A sudden check; abashment; frustration; ruin; as, his hopes received a dash.

Dashnoun

A slight admixture, infusion, or adulteration; a partial overspreading; as, wine with a dash of water; red with a dash of purple.

‘Innocence when it has in it a dash of folly.’;

Dashnoun

A rapid movement, esp. one of short duration; a quick stroke or blow; a sudden onset or rush; as, a bold dash at the enemy; a dash of rain.

‘She takes upon her bravely at first dash.’;

Dashnoun

Energy in style or action; animation; spirit.

Dashnoun

A vain show; a blustering parade; a flourish; as, to make or cut a great dash.

Dashnoun

A mark or line [-], in writing or printing, denoting a sudden break, stop, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt change in its construction, a long or significant pause, or an unexpected or epigrammatic turn of sentiment. Dashes are also sometimes used instead of marks or parenthesis.

Dashnoun

The sign of staccato, a small mark [ ] denoting that the note over which it is placed is to be performed in a short, distinct manner.

Dashnoun

A short, spirited effort or trial of speed upon a race course; - used in horse racing, when a single trial constitutes the race.

Dashnoun

distinctive and stylish elegance;

‘he wooed her with the confident dash of a cavalry officer’;

Dashnoun

a quick run

Dashnoun

a footrace run at top speed;

‘he is preparing for the 100-yard dash’;

Dashnoun

a punctuation mark (-) used between parts of a compound word or between the syllables of a word when the word is divided at the end of a line of text

Dashnoun

the longer of the two telegraphic signals used in Morse code

Dashnoun

the act of moving with great haste;

‘he made a dash for the door’;

Dashverb

run or move very quickly or hastily;

‘She dashed into the yard’;

Dashverb

break into pieces, as by striking or knocking over;

‘Smash a plate’;

Dashverb

hurl or thrust violently;

‘He dashed the plate against the wall’; ‘Waves were dashing against the rock’;

Dashverb

destroy or break;

‘dashed ambitions and hopes’;

Dashverb

cause to lose courage;

‘dashed by the refusal’;

Dashverb

add an enlivening or altering element to;

‘blue paint dashed with white’;

Dashverb

run or travel somewhere in a great hurry

‘I must dash, I'm late’; ‘I dashed into the garden’;

Dashverb

strike or fling (something) somewhere with great force, especially so as to have a destructive effect; hurl

‘the ship was dashed upon the rocks’;

Dashverb

strike forcefully against something

‘a gust of rain dashed against the bricks’;

Dashverb

destroy or frustrate (hopes or expectations)

‘the budget dashed hopes of an increase in funding’;

Dashverb

cause (someone) to lose confidence; dispirit

‘I won't tell Stuart—I think he'd be dashed’;

Dashinterjection

used to express mild annoyance

‘dash it all, I am in charge’;

Dashnoun

an act of running somewhere suddenly and hastily

‘she made a dash for the door’;

Dashnoun

a journey or period of time characterized by urgency or eager haste

‘a 20-mile dash to the airport’;

Dashnoun

a short, fast race run in one heat; a sprint

‘the 100 m dash’;

Dashnoun

a small quantity of a liquid added to something else

‘whisky with a dash of soda’;

Dashnoun

a small amount of a quality that adds piquancy or distinctiveness to something else

‘a casual atmosphere with a dash of sophistication’;

Dashnoun

a horizontal stroke in writing or printing to mark a pause or break in sense or to represent omitted letters or words.

Dashnoun

the longer signal of the two used in Morse code.

Dashnoun

a short vertical mark placed above or beneath a note to indicate that it is to be performed in a very staccato manner.

Dashnoun

impetuous or flamboyant vigour and confidence; panache

‘he has youthful energy, dash, and charisma’;

Dashnoun

short for dashboard

‘an indicator on the dash tells you what gear you are in’;

Dash

The dash is a punctuation mark that is similar in appearance to the hyphen and minus sign but differs from these symbols in length and, in some fonts, height above the baseline. The most common versions of the dash are the en dash –, longer than the hyphen; the em dash —, longer than the en dash; and the horizontal bar ―, whose length varies across typefaces but tends to be between those of the en and em dashes.

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