VS.

Clamp vs. Vice

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Clampnoun

A brace, band, or clasp for strengthening or holding things together.

Vicenoun

A bad habit.

‘Gluttony is a vice, not a virtue.’;

Clampnoun

(medicine) An instrument used to temporarily shut off blood vessels, etc.

Vicenoun

(legal) Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, or drugs.

Clampnoun

(UK) A parking enforcement device used to immobilise a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp.

Vicenoun

A defect in the temper or behaviour of a horse, such as to make the animal dangerous, to injure its health, or to diminish its usefulness.

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Clampnoun

A mass of bricks heaped up to be burned; or of ore for roasting, or of coal coking.

Vicenoun

A mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping or holding (also spelled vise).

Clampnoun

A pile of root vegetables stored under a layer of earth.

Vicenoun

A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.

Clampnoun

A piece of wood (batten) across the grain of a board end to keep it flat, as in a breadboard.

Vicenoun

(obsolete) A grip or grasp.

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Clampnoun

(electronics) An electronic circuit that fixes either the positive or the negative peak excursions of a signal to a defined value by shifting its DC value.

Vicenoun

(architecture) A winding or spiral staircase.

Clampnoun

(dated) A heavy footstep; a tramp.

Viceverb

To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice.

Clampverb

To fasten in place or together with (or as if with) a clamp.

Viceadjective

in place of; subordinate to; designating a person below another in rank

‘vice president’; ‘vice admiral’;

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Clampverb

(transitive) To hold or grip tightly.

Vicepreposition

instead of, in place of

‘A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned.’;

Clampverb

(transitive) To modify (a numeric value) so it lies within a specific range.

Vicenoun

A defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a horse.

‘Withouten vice of syllable or letter.’; ‘Mark the vice of the procedure.’;

Clampverb

To cover (vegetables, etc.) with earth.

Vicenoun

A moral fault or failing; especially, immoral conduct or habit, as in the indulgence of degrading appetites; customary deviation in a single respect, or in general, from a right standard, implying a defect of natural character, or the result of training and habits; a harmful custom; immorality; depravity; wickedness; as, a life of vice; the vice of intemperance.

‘I do confess the vices of my blood.’; ‘Ungoverned appetite . . . a brutish vice.’; ‘When vice prevails, and impious men bear sway,The post of honor is a private station.’;

Clampverb

To tread heavily or clumsily; to clump or clomp.

Vicenoun

The buffoon of the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice, sometimes of another, or of Vice itself; - called also Iniquity.

‘How like you the Vice in the play? . . . I would not give a rush for a Vice that has not a wooden dagger to snap at everybody.’;

Clampnoun

Something rigid that holds fast or binds things together; a piece of wood or metal, used to hold two or more pieces together.

Vicenoun

A kind of instrument for holding work, as in filing. Same as Vise.

Clampnoun

An instrument with a screw or screws by which work is held in its place or two parts are temporarily held together.

Vicenoun

A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.

Clampnoun

One of a pair of movable pieces of lead, or other soft material, to cover the jaws of a vise and enable it to grasp without bruising.

Vicenoun

A gripe or grasp.

Clampnoun

A thick plank on the inner part of a ship's side, used to sustain the ends of beams.

Viceverb

To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice.

‘The coachman's hand was viced between his upper and lower thigh.’;

Clampnoun

A mass of bricks heaped up to be burned; or of ore for roasting, or of coal for coking.

Vicepreposition

In the place of; in the stead; as, A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned.

Clampnoun

A mollusk. See Clam.

Viceadjective

Denoting one who in certain cases may assume the office or duties of a superior; designating an officer or an office that is second in rank or authority; as, vice president; vice agent; vice consul, etc.

Clampnoun

A heavy footstep; a tramp.

Vicenoun

moral weakness

Clampverb

To fasten with a clamp or clamps; to apply a clamp to; to place in a clamp.

Vicenoun

a specific form of evildoing;

‘vice offends the moral standards of the community’;

Clampverb

To cover, as vegetables, with earth.

Vice

A vice is a practice, behaviour, or habit generally considered immoral, sinful, criminal, rude, taboo, depraved, degrading, deviant or perverted in the associated society. In more minor usage, vice can refer to a fault, a negative character trait, a defect, an infirmity, or a bad or unhealthy habit.

Clampverb

To tread heavily or clumsily; to clump.

‘The policeman with clamping feet.’;

Clampnoun

a device (used by carpenters) that holds things firmly together

Clampverb

fasten or fix with a clamp;

‘clamp the chair together until the glue has hardened’;

Clampverb

impose or inflict forcefully;

‘The military government clamped a curfew onto the capital’;

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