VS.

Chappy vs. Open

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Chappynoun

A chap; a fellow.

Openadjective

(not comparable) Not closed; accessible; unimpeded.

‘Turn left after the second open door.’; ‘It was as if his body had gone to sleep standing up and with his eyes open.’;

Chappyadjective

Full of chaps; cleft; gaping; open.

Openadjective

Not drawn together, closed, or contracted; extended; expanded.

‘an open hand; an open flower; an open prospect’;

Chappyadjective

Chapped, dry.

Openadjective

(not comparable) Actively conducting or prepared to conduct business.

‘Banks are not open on bank holidays.’;

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Chappy

Full of chaps; cleft; gaping; open.

Openadjective

(comparable) Receptive.

‘I am open to new ideas.’;

Openadjective

(not comparable) Public

‘He published an open letter to the governor on a full page of the New York Times.’;

Openadjective

(not comparable) Candid, ingenuous, not subtle in character.

‘The man is an open book.’;

Openadjective

Having a free variable.

Openadjective

Which is part of a predefined collection of subsets of X, that defines a topological space on X.

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Openadjective

Whose first and last vertices are different.

Openadjective

In current use; mapped to part of memory.

‘I couldn't save my changes because another user had the same file open.’;

Openadjective

(business) Not fulfilled.

‘I've got open orders for as many containers of red durum as you can get me.’;

Openadjective

Not settled or adjusted; not decided or determined; not closed or withdrawn from consideration.

‘an open question’; ‘to keep an offer or opportunity open’;

Openadjective

Without any fingers pressing the string against the fingerboard.

Openadjective

Not of a quality to prevent communication, as by closing waterways, blocking roads, etc.; hence, not frosty or inclement; mild; used of the weather or the climate.

‘an open winter’;

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Openadjective

(phonetics) Uttered with a relatively wide opening of the articulating organs; said of vowels.

Openadjective

(phonetics) Uttered, as a consonant, with the oral passage simply narrowed without closure.

Openadjective

That ends in a vowel; not having a coda.

Openadjective

(computing) Made public, usable with a free licence.

Openadjective

(medicine) Resulting from an incision, puncture or any other process by which the skin no longer protects an internal part of the body.

Openverb

(transitive) To make something accessible or allow for passage by moving from a shut position.

‘Turn the doorknob to open the door.’;

Openverb

(transitive) To make (an open space, etc.) by clearing away an obstacle or obstacles, in order to allow for passage, access, or visibility.

‘He opened a path through the undergrowth.’;

Openverb

(transitive) To bring up, broach.

‘I don't want to open that subject.’;

Openverb

(transitive) To enter upon, begin.

‘to open a discussion’; ‘to open fire upon an enemy’; ‘to open trade, or correspondence’; ‘to open a case in court, or a meeting’;

Openverb

(transitive) To spread; to expand into an open or loose position.

‘to open a closed fist’; ‘to open matted cotton by separating the fibres’; ‘to open a map, book, or scroll’;

Openverb

(transitive) To make accessible to customers or clients.

‘I will open the shop an hour early tomorrow.’;

Openverb

(transitive) To start (a campaign).

‘Vermont will open elk hunting season next week.’;

Openverb

(intransitive) To become open.

‘The door opened all by itself.’;

Openverb

(intransitive) To begin conducting business.

‘The shop opens at 9:00.’;

Openverb

To begin a side's innings as one of the first two batsmen.

Openverb

To bet before any other player has in a particular betting round in a game of poker.

‘After the first two players fold, Julie opens for $5.’;

Openverb

To reveal one's hand.

‘Jeff opens his hand revealing a straight flush.’;

Openverb

To load into memory for viewing or editing.

Openverb

(obsolete) To disclose; to reveal; to interpret; to explain.

Opennoun

A sports event in which anybody can compete; as, the Australian Open.

Opennoun

(electronics) A wire that is broken midway.

‘The electrician found the open in the circuit after a few minutes of testing.’;

Opennoun

(with the) Open or unobstructed space; an exposed location.

‘I can't believe you left the lawnmower out in the open when you knew it was going to rain this afternoon!’; ‘Wary of hunters, the fleeing deer kept well out of the open, dodging instead from thicket to thicket.’;

Opennoun

(with the) Public knowledge or scrutiny; full view.

‘We have got to bring this company's corrupt business practices into the open.’;

Openadjective

Free of access; not shut up; not closed; affording unobstructed ingress or egress; not impeding or preventing passage; not locked up or covered over; - applied to passageways; as, an open door, window, road, etc.; also, to inclosed structures or objects; as, open houses, boxes, baskets, bottles, etc.; also, to means of communication or approach by water or land; as, an open harbor or roadstead.

‘Through the gate,Wide open and unguarded, Satan passed.’; ‘His ears are open unto their cry.’;

Openadjective

Free to be used, enjoyed, visited, or the like; not private; public; unrestricted in use; as, an open library, museum, court, or other assembly; liable to the approach, trespass, or attack of any one; unprotected; exposed.

‘If Demetrius . . . have a matter against any man, the law is open and there are deputies.’; ‘The service that I truly did his life,Hath left me open to all injuries.’;

Openadjective

Free or cleared of obstruction to progress or to view; accessible; as, an open tract; the open sea.

Openadjective

Not drawn together, closed, or contracted; extended; expanded; as, an open hand; open arms; an open flower; an open prospect.

‘Each, with open arms, embraced her chosen knight.’;

Openadjective

Without reserve or false pretense; sincere; characterized by sincerity; unfeigned; frank; also, generous; liberal; bounteous; - applied to personal appearance, or character, and to the expression of thought and feeling, etc.

‘With aspect open, shall erect his head.’; ‘The Moor is of a free and open nature.’; ‘The French are always open, familiar, and talkative.’;

Openadjective

Not concealed or secret; not hidden or disguised; exposed to view or to knowledge; revealed; apparent; as, open schemes or plans; open shame or guilt; open source code.

‘His thefts are too open.’; ‘That I may find him, and with secret gazeOr open admiration him behold.’;

Openadjective

Not of a quality to prevent communication, as by closing water ways, blocking roads, etc.; hence, not frosty or inclement; mild; - used of the weather or the climate; as, an open season; an open winter.

Openadjective

Not settled or adjusted; not decided or determined; not closed or withdrawn from consideration; as, an open account; an open question; to keep an offer or opportunity open.

Openadjective

Free; disengaged; unappropriated; as, to keep a day open for any purpose; to be open for an engagement.

Openadjective

Uttered with a relatively wide opening of the articulating organs; - said of vowels; as, the än fär is open as compared with the ā in sāy.

Openadjective

Not closed or stopped with the finger; - said of the string of an instrument, as of a violin, when it is allowed to vibrate throughout its whole length.

Opennoun

Open or unobstructed space; clear land, without trees or obstructions; open ocean; open water.

‘Then we got into the open.’;

Openverb

To make or set open; to render free of access; to unclose; to unbar; to unlock; to remove any fastening or covering from; as, to open a door; to open a box; to open a room; to open a letter.

‘And all the windows of my heartI open to the day.’;

Openverb

To spread; to expand; as, to open the hand.

Openverb

To disclose; to reveal; to interpret; to explain.

‘The king opened himself to some of his council, that he was sorry for the earl's death.’; ‘Unto thee have I opened my cause.’; ‘While he opened to us the Scriptures.’;

Openverb

To make known; to discover; also, to render available or accessible for settlements, trade, etc.

‘The English did adventure far for to open the North parts of America.’;

Openverb

To enter upon; to begin; as, to open a discussion; to open fire upon an enemy; to open trade, or correspondence; to open an investigation; to open a case in court, or a meeting.

Openverb

To loosen or make less compact; as, to open matted cotton by separating the fibers.

‘Poetry that had opened up so many delightful views into the character and condition of our "bold peasantry, their country's pride."’;

Openverb

To unclose; to form a hole, breach, or gap; to be unclosed; to be parted.

‘The earth opened and swallowed up Dathan, and covered the company of Abiram.’;

Openverb

To expand; to spread out; to be disclosed; as, the harbor opened to our view.

Openverb

To begin; to commence; as, the stock opened at par; the battery opened upon the enemy.

Openverb

To bark on scent or view of the game.

Opennoun

a clear or unobstructed space or expanse of land or water;

‘finally broke out of the forest into the open’;

Opennoun

where the air is unconfined;

‘he wanted to get outdoors a little’; ‘the concert was held in the open air’; ‘camping in the open’;

Opennoun

a tournament in which both professionals and amateurs may play

Opennoun

information that has become public;

‘all the reports were out in the open’; ‘the facts had been brought to the surface’;

Openverb

cause to open or to become open;

‘Mary opened the car door’;

Openverb

start to operate or function or cause to start operating or functioning;

‘open a business’;

Openverb

become open;

‘The door opened’;

Openverb

begin or set in action, of meetings, speeches, recitals, etc.;

‘He opened the meeting with a long speech’;

Openverb

spread out or open from a closed or folded state;

‘open the map’; ‘spread your arms’;

Openverb

make available;

‘This opens up new possibilities’;

Openverb

become available;

‘an opportunity opened up’;

Openverb

have an opening or passage or outlet;

‘The bedrooms open into the hall’;

Openverb

make the opening move;

‘Kasparov opened with a standard opening’;

Openverb

afford access to;

‘the door opens to the patio’; ‘The French doors give onto a terrace’;

Openverb

display the contents of a file or start an application as on a computer

Openadjective

affording unobstructed entrance and exit; not shut or closed;

‘an open door’; ‘they left the door open’;

Openadjective

affording free passage or access;

‘open drains’; ‘the road is open to traffic’; ‘open ranks’;

Openadjective

with no protection or shield;

‘the exposed northeast frontier’; ‘open to the weather’; ‘an open wound’;

Openadjective

open to or in view of all;

‘an open protest’; ‘an open letter to the editor’;

Openadjective

used of mouth or eyes;

‘keep your eyes open’; ‘his mouth slightly opened’;

Openadjective

not having been filled;

‘the job is still open’;

Openadjective

accessible to all;

‘open season’; ‘an open economy’;

Openadjective

not defended or capable of being defended;

‘an open city’; ‘open to attack’;

Openadjective

(of textures) full of small openings or gaps;

‘an open texture’; ‘a loose weave’;

Openadjective

having no protecting cover or enclosure;

‘an open boat’; ‘an open fire’; ‘open sports cars’;

Openadjective

opened out;

‘an open newspaper’;

Openadjective

of a set; containing points whose neighborhood consists of other points of the same set, or being the complement of an open set; of an interval; containing neither of its end points

Openadjective

not brought to a conclusion; subject to further thought;

‘an open question’; ‘our position on this bill is still undecided’; ‘our lawsuit is still undetermined’;

Openadjective

not sealed or having been unsealed;

‘the letter was already open’; ‘the opened package lay on the table’;

Openadjective

without undue constriction as from e.g. tenseness or inhibition;

‘the clarity and resonance of an open tone’; ‘her natural and open response’;

Openadjective

relatively empty of and unobstructed by fences or hedges or headlands or shoals;

‘in open country’; ‘the open countryside’; ‘open waters’; ‘on the open seas’;

Openadjective

open and observable; not secret or hidden;

‘an overt lie’; ‘overt hostility’; ‘overt intelligence gathering’;

Openadjective

used of string or hole or pipe of instruments

Openadjective

not requiring union membership;

‘an open shop employs nonunion workers’;

Openadjective

possibly accepting or permitting;

‘a passage capable of misinterpretation’; ‘open to interpretation’; ‘an issue open to question’; ‘the time is fixed by the director and players and therefore subject to much variation’;

Openadjective

not secret;

‘open plans’; ‘an open ballot’;

Openadjective

without any attempt at concealment; completely obvious;

‘open disregard of the law’; ‘open family strife’; ‘open hostility’; ‘a blatant appeal to vanity’; ‘a blazing indiscretion’;

Openadjective

affording free passage or view;

‘a clear view’; ‘a clear path to victory’;

Openadjective

lax in enforcing laws;

‘an open town’;

Openadjective

openly straightforward and direct without reserve or secretiveness;

‘his candid eyes’; ‘an open and trusting nature’; ‘a heart-to-heart talk’;

Openadjective

sincere and free of reserve in expression;

‘Please be open with me’;

Openadjective

receptive to new ideas;

‘an open mind’; ‘open to new ideas’;

Openadjective

ready for business;

‘the stores are open’;

Openadjective

allowing access, passage, or a view through an empty space; not closed or blocked

‘he climbed through the open window’; ‘the pass is kept open by snowploughs’; ‘she was put in a cubicle with the curtains left open’;

Openadjective

(of a container) not fastened or sealed

‘the case burst open and its contents flew all over the place’;

Openadjective

(of a garment or its fastenings) not done up

‘his tie was knotted below the open collar of his shirt’;

Openadjective

(of the mouth or eyes) with lips or lids parted

‘the boy's mouth dropped open in shock’; ‘his eyes were open but he could see nothing’;

Openadjective

(of a fabric) loosely knitted or woven.

Openadjective

(of the bowels) not constipated.

Openadjective

exposed to the air or to view; not covered

‘an open fire burned in the grate’; ‘he crossed the ocean in an open boat’;

Openadjective

(of land) not covered with buildings or trees

‘the plans allow increasing numbers of new houses in open countryside’;

Openadjective

damaged by a deep cut in the surface

‘he had his arm slashed open’;

Openadjective

likely to suffer from or be affected by; vulnerable or subject to

‘the system is open to abuse’;

Openadjective

(of a goalmouth or other object of attack in a game) unprotected by defenders.

Openadjective

(of a town or city) officially declared to be undefended, and so immune under international law from bombardment.

Openadjective

with the outer edges or sides drawn away from each other; unfolded or spread out

‘the trees had buds and a few open flowers’;

Openadjective

(of a book or file) with the covers parted allowing it to be read

‘she was copying verses from an open Bible’;

Openadjective

(of a hand) not clenched into a fist.

Openadjective

(of a business, place of entertainment, etc.) admitting customers or visitors; available for business

‘parts of the castle are open to the public’; ‘the shop stays open until 9 p.m’;

Openadjective

(of a bank account) available for transactions

‘I withdrew all my money except the minimum required to keep the account open’;

Openadjective

(of a telephone line) ready to take calls

‘our free advice line is open from 8.30 to 17.30’;

Openadjective

freely available or accessible; unrestricted

‘the service is open to all students’;

Openadjective

(of an offer or opportunity) still available

‘the offer is open while stocks last’; ‘we need to consider what options are left open’;

Openadjective

with no restrictions on those allowed to participate

‘each horse had won two open races’; ‘open discussion meetings’;

Openadjective

(of a victor) having won an open competition

‘an Open champion’;

Openadjective

(of a ticket) not restricted as to day of travel

‘I have an open ticket, so I can travel any day I like’;

Openadjective

(of a cheque) not crossed.

Openadjective

(of a set) not containing any of its limit points.

Openadjective

not concealing one's thoughts or feelings; frank and communicative

‘she behaved in an open and cheerful manner’; ‘I was quite open about my views’;

Openadjective

not concealed

‘his eyes showed open admiration as they swept over her’;

Openadjective

(of conflict) fully developed and unconcealed

‘the dispute erupted into open war’;

Openadjective

welcoming public discussion, criticism, and enquiry

‘the party's commitment to open government’;

Openadjective

(of a game or style of play) characterized by action which is spread out over the field

‘both sides played fast, open rugby to produce a high-scoring game’;

Openadjective

(of a matter or decision) not finally settled; still admitting of debate

‘students' choice of degree can be kept open until the second year’;

Openadjective

(of the mind) accessible to new ideas

‘I'm keeping an open mind about my future’;

Openadjective

receptive to

‘the union was open to suggestions for improvements’;

Openadjective

admitting of; making possible

‘the message is open to different interpretations’;

Openadjective

(of a vowel) produced with a relatively wide opening of the mouth and the tongue kept low.

Openadjective

(of a syllable) ending in a vowel.

Openadjective

(of a string) allowed to vibrate along its whole length.

Openadjective

(of a pipe) unstopped at each end.

Openadjective

(of a note) sounded from an open string or pipe.

Openadjective

(of an electric circuit) having a break in the conducting path.

Openverb

move (a door or window) so as to leave a space allowing access and vision

‘‘Open up!’ he said’; ‘she opened the door and went in’;

Openverb

(of a door or window) be moved to leave a space allowing access

‘the door opened and a man came out’;

Openverb

undo or remove the lid, cover, or fastening of (a container, package, letter, etc.) to get access to the contents

‘can we open the presents now?’; ‘he opened a bottle inexpertly, spilling some of the wine’;

Openverb

part the lips or lids of (one's mouth or eye)

‘she opened her mouth to argue’;

Openverb

(of the mouth or eyes) have the lips or lids parted

‘her eyes slowly opened’;

Openverb

come apart; lose or lack its protective covering

‘old wounds opened and I bled a little bit’;

Openverb

(of a room, door, or window) give access to

‘the kitchen opened into a pleasant sitting room’;

Openverb

cause evacuation of (the bowels).

Openverb

unfold or be unfolded; spread out

‘the eagle opened its wings and circled up into the air’; ‘the tail looks like a fan when it is opened out fully’; ‘the flowers only open during bright weather’;

Openverb

part the covers of (a book or file) to read it

‘she opened her book at the prologue’;

Openverb

become wider

‘the path opened out into a glade’;

Openverb

(of a prospect) extend into view

‘stop to marvel at the views that open out below’;

Openverb

achieve a clear view of (a place) by sailing past a headland or other obstruction

‘we shall open Torbay shortly’;

Openverb

make or become formally ready for customers, visitors, or business

‘she raised $731 by opening her home and selling coffee and tea’; ‘the shops didn't open until 10’;

Openverb

ceremonially declare (a building, road, etc.) to be completed and ready for use

‘the Queen opened the power plant on 17 October 1956’;

Openverb

make possible access to or passage through

‘the President announced that his government would open the border’;

Openverb

formally establish or begin (a new business, movement, or enterprise)

‘she began to teach and opened her own school’; ‘we opened up a branch in Madrid’;

Openverb

(of an enterprise, meeting, or event) begin or be formally established

‘two new restaurants open this week’;

Openverb

take the action required to begin using

‘click twice to open a file for the software selected’; ‘they have the £10 necessary to open a savings account’;

Openverb

(of a piece of writing or music) begin

‘the chapter opens with a discussion of Anglo-Irish relations’;

Openverb

(of a process) start to develop

‘a new and dramatic phase was opening up’;

Openverb

(of a counsel in a law court) make a preliminary statement in (a case) before calling witnesses

‘Comyn opened for the plaintiff’; ‘Bernard had opened the case’;

Openverb

another term for open the batting below

Openverb

make (the first bid) in the auction

‘West opened 2NT’; ‘do not open with fewer than twelve points’;

Openverb

make available or more widely known

‘new technologies open up thousands of different opportunities’; ‘the move may force the company to open up its plans for the future’;

Openverb

become more communicative or confiding

‘he was very reserved and only opened out to her slowly’;

Openverb

make (one's mind) more receptive or sympathetic

‘open your mind to what is going on around you’;

Openverb

make someone vulnerable to

‘the process is going to open them to a legal threat’;

Openverb

break the conducting path of (an electric circuit)

‘the switch opens the motor circuit’;

Openverb

(of an electric circuit or device) suffer a break in its conducting path

‘the problem was caused when a switch opened at the substation’;

Opennoun

outdoors or in the countryside

‘guests were sitting in the open on the terrace’;

Opennoun

not subject to concealment; made public

‘we have never let our dislike for him come into the open’;

Opennoun

a championship or competition with no restrictions on who may compete

‘his victory in the 2003 Australian Open’;

Opennoun

an accidental break in the conducting path for an electric current.

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