VS.

Change vs. Stability

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Changeverb

(intransitive) To become something different.

‘The tadpole changed into a frog.’; ‘Stock prices are constantly changing.’;

Stabilitynoun

The condition of being stable or in equilibrium, and thus resistant to change.

Changeverb

To make something into something else.

‘The fairy changed the frog into a prince.’; ‘I had to change the wording of the ad so it would fit.’;

Stabilitynoun

The tendency to recover from perturbations.

Changeverb

(transitive) To replace.

‘Ask the janitor to come and change the lightbulb.’; ‘After a brisk walk, I washed up and changed my shirt.’;

Stabilitynoun

The state or quality of being stable, or firm; steadiness; stableness; firmness; strength to stand without being moved or overthrown; as, the stability of a structure; the stability of a throne or a constitution.

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Changeverb

(intransitive) To replace one's clothing.

‘You can't go into the dressing room while she's changing.’; ‘The clowns changed into their costumes before the circus started.’;

Stabilitynoun

Steadiness or firmness of character; firmness of resolution or purpose; the quality opposite to fickleness, irresolution, or inconstancy; constancy; steadfastness; as, a man of little stability, or of unusual stability.

Changeverb

(intransitive) To transfer to another vehicle (train, bus, etc.)

Stabilitynoun

Fixedness; - as opposed to fluidity.

‘Since fluidness and stability are contrary qualities.’;

Changeverb

(archaic) To exchange.

Stabilitynoun

the quality or attribute of being firm and steadfast

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Changeverb

(transitive) To change hand while riding (a horse).

‘to change a horse’;

Stabilitynoun

a stable order

Changenoun

(countable) The process of becoming different.

‘The product is undergoing a change in order to improve it.’;

Stabilitynoun

the quality of being free from change or variation

Changenoun

(uncountable) Small denominations of money given in exchange for a larger denomination.

‘Can I get change for this $100 bill please?’;

Changenoun

(countable) A replacement, e.g. a change of clothes

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Changenoun

(uncountable) Money given back when a customer hands over more than the exact price of an item.

‘A customer who pays with a 10-pound note for a £9 item receives one pound in change.’;

Changenoun

(uncountable) Coins (as opposed to paper money).

‘Do you have any change on you? I need to make a phone call.’;

Changenoun

(countable) A transfer between vehicles.

‘The train journey from Bristol to Nottingham includes a change at Birmingham.’;

Changenoun

(baseball) A change-up pitch.

Changenoun

(campanology) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.

Changenoun

(dated) A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; an exchange.

Changenoun

A public house; an alehouse.

Changeverb

To alter; to make different; to cause to pass from one state to another; as, to change the position, character, or appearance of a thing; to change the countenance.

‘Therefore will I change their glory into shame.’;

Changeverb

To alter by substituting something else for, or by giving up for something else; as, to change the clothes; to change one's occupation; to change one's intention.

‘They that do change old love for new,Pray gods, they change for worse!’;

Changeverb

To give and take reciprocally; to exchange; - followed by with; as, to change place, or hats, or money, with another.

‘Look upon those thousands with whom thou wouldst not, for any interest, change thy fortune and condition.’;

Changeverb

Specifically: To give, or receive, smaller denominations of money (technically called change) for; as, to change a gold coin or a bank bill.

‘He pulled out a thirty-pound note and bid me change it.’;

Changeverb

To be altered; to undergo variation; as, men sometimes change for the better.

‘For I am Lord, I change not.’;

Changeverb

To pass from one phase to another; as, the moon changes to-morrow night.

Changenoun

Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles.

‘Apprehensions of a change of dynasty.’; ‘All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.’;

Changenoun

A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons.

‘Our fathers did for change to France repair.’; ‘The ringing grooves of change.’;

Changenoun

A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon.

Changenoun

Alteration in the order of a series; permutation.

Changenoun

That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another.

‘Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments.’;

Changenoun

Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due.

Changenoun

A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions.

Changenoun

A public house; an alehouse.

‘They call an alehouse a change.’;

Changenoun

Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.

‘Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing.’;

Changenoun

an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another;

‘the change was intended to increase sales’; ‘this storm is certainly a change for the worse’; ‘the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago’;

Changenoun

a relational difference between states; especially between states before and after some event;

‘he attributed the change to their marriage’;

Changenoun

the action of changing something;

‘the change of government had no impact on the economy’; ‘his change on abortion cost him the election’;

Changenoun

the result of alteration or modification;

‘there were marked changes in the lining of the lungs’; ‘there had been no change in the mountains’;

Changenoun

the balance of money received when the amount you tender is greater than the amount due;

‘I paid with a twenty and pocketed the change’;

Changenoun

a thing that is different;

‘he inspected several changes before selecting one’;

Changenoun

a different or fresh set of clothes;

‘she brought a change in her overnight bag’;

Changenoun

coins of small denomination regarded collectively;

‘he had a pocketful of change’;

Changenoun

money received in return for its equivalent in a larger denomination or a different currency;

‘he got change for a twenty and used it to pay the taxi driver’;

Changenoun

a difference that is usually pleasant;

‘he goes to France for variety’; ‘it is a refreshing change to meet a woman mechanic’;

Changeverb

undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature;

‘She changed completely as she grew older’; ‘The weather changed last night’;

Changeverb

cause to change; make different; cause a transformation;

‘The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city’; ‘The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue’;

Changeverb

make or become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence;

‘her mood changes in accordance with the weather’; ‘The supermarket's selection of vegetables varies according to the season’;

Changeverb

lay aside, abandon, or leave for another;

‘switch to a different brand of beer’; ‘She switched psychiatrists’; ‘The car changed lanes’;

Changeverb

change clothes; put on different clothes;

‘Change before you go to the opera’;

Changeverb

exchange or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category;

‘Could you convert my dollars into pounds?’; ‘He changed his name’; ‘convert centimeters into inches’; ‘convert holdings into shares’;

Changeverb

give to, and receive from, one another;

‘Would you change places with me?’; ‘We have been exchanging letters for a year’;

Changeverb

change from one vehicle or transportation line to another;

‘She changed in Chicago on her way to the East coast’;

Changeverb

become deeper in tone;

‘His voice began to change when he was 12 years old’; ‘Her voice deepened when she whispered the password’;

Changeverb

remove or replace the coverings of;

‘Father had to learn how to change the baby’; ‘After each guest we changed the bed linens’;

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