VS.

Carry vs. Load

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Carryverb

(transitive) To lift (something) and take it to another place; to transport (something) by lifting.

Loadnoun

A burden; a weight to be carried.

‘I struggled up the hill with the heavy load in my rucksack.’;

Carryverb

To transfer from one place (such as a country, book, or column) to another.

‘to carry the war from Greece into Asia’; ‘to carry an account to the ledger’;

Loadnoun

(figuratively) A worry or concern to be endured, especially in the phrase a load off one's mind.

Carryverb

To convey by extension or continuance; to extend.

‘The builders are going to carry the chimney through {{the roof.’; ‘}} They would have carried the road ten miles further, but ran out of materials.’;

Loadnoun

A certain number of articles or quantity of material that can be transported or processed at one time.

‘The truck overturned while carrying a full load of oil.’; ‘She put another load of clothes in the washing machine.’;

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Carryverb

To move; to convey by force; to impel; to conduct; to lead or guide.

Loadnoun

(in combination) Used to form nouns that indicate a large quantity, often corresponding to the capacity of a vehicle

Carryverb

(transitive) To stock or supply (something).

‘The corner drugstore doesn't carry his favorite brand of aspirin.’;

Loadnoun

A large number or amount.

‘I got loads of presents for my birthday!’; ‘I got a load of emails about that.’;

Carryverb

(transitive) To adopt (something); take (something) over.

‘I think I can carry Smith's work while she is out.’;

Loadnoun

The volume of work required to be performed.

‘Will our web servers be able to cope with that load?’;

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Carryverb

(transitive) To adopt or resolve upon, especially in a deliberative assembly

‘The court carries that motion.’;

Loadnoun

(engineering) The force exerted on a structural component such as a beam, girder, cable etc.

‘Each of the cross-members must withstand a tensile load of 1,000 newtons.’;

Carryverb

In an addition, to transfer the quantity in excess of what is countable in the units in a column to the column immediately to the left in order to be added there.

‘Five and nine are fourteen; carry the one to the tens place.’;

Loadnoun

(electrical engineering) The electrical current or power delivered by a device.

‘I'm worried that the load on that transformer will be too high.’;

Carryverb

(transitive) To have or maintain (something).

‘Always carry sufficient insurance to protect against a loss.’;

Loadnoun

(engineering) A resistive force encountered by a prime mover when performing work.

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Carryverb

(intransitive) To be transmitted; to travel.

‘The sound of the bells carried for miles on the wind.’;

Loadnoun

(electrical engineering) Any component that draws current or power from an electrical circuit.

‘Connect a second 24 ohm load across the power supply's output terminals.’;

Carryverb

To insult, to diss.

Loadnoun

A unit of measure for various quantities.

Carryverb

To capture a ship by coming alongside and boarding.

Loadnoun

A very small explosive inserted as a gag into a cigarette or cigar.

Carryverb

To transport (the ball) whilst maintaining possession.

Loadnoun

The charge of powder for a firearm.

Carryverb

(transitive) To have on one's person.

‘she always carries a purse;’; ‘marsupials carry their young in a pouch’;

Loadnoun

(obsolete) Weight or violence of blows.

Carryverb

To be pregnant (with).

‘The doctor said she's carrying twins.’;

Loadnoun

The contents (e.g. semen) of an ejaculation.

Carryverb

To have propulsive power; to propel.

‘A gun or mortar carries well.’;

Loadnoun

(euphemism) Nonsense; rubbish.

‘What a load!’;

Carryverb

To hold the head; said of a horse.

‘to carry well, i.e. to hold the head high, with arching neck’;

Loadnoun

(computing) The process of loading something, i.e. transferring it into memory or over a network, etc.

‘All of those uncompressed images are going to slow down the page load.’;

Carryverb

(hunting) To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.

Loadverb

(transitive) To put a load on or in (a means of conveyance or a place of storage).

‘The dock workers refused to load the ship.’;

Carryverb

To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, as a leader or principle; hence, to succeed in, as in a contest; to bring to a successful issue; to win.

‘The Tories carried the election.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To place in or on a conveyance or a place of storage.

‘The longshoremen loaded the cargo quickly.’; ‘He loaded his stuff into his storage locker.’;

Carryverb

(obsolete) To get possession of by force; to capture.

Loadverb

(intransitive) To put a load on something.

‘The truck was supposed to leave at dawn, but in fact we spent all morning loading.’;

Carryverb

To contain; to comprise; to bear the aspect of; to show or exhibit; to imply.

Loadverb

(intransitive) To receive a load.

‘The truck is designed to load easily.’;

Carryverb

(reflexive) To bear (oneself); to behave or conduct.

Loadverb

(intransitive) To be placed into storage or conveyance.

‘The containers load quickly and easily.’;

Carryverb

To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another.

‘A merchant is carrying a large stock;’; ‘a farm carries {{a mortgage;’; ‘}} a broker carries stock for {{a customer;’; ‘}} to carry a life insurance.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To fill (a firearm or artillery) with munition.

‘I pulled the trigger, but nothing happened. I had forgotten to load the gun.’;

Carryverb

(intransitive) To have a weapon on one's person; to be armed.

Loadverb

(transitive) To insert (an item or items) into an apparatus so as to ready it for operation, such as a reel of film into a camera, sheets of paper into a printer etc.

‘Now that you've loaded the film you're ready to start shooting.’;

Carrynoun

A manner of transporting or lifting something; the grip or position in which something is carried.

‘Adjust your carry from time to time so that you don't tire too quickly.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To fill (an apparatus) with raw material.

‘The workers loaded the blast furnace with coke and ore.’;

Carrynoun

A tract of land over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a portage.

Loadverb

(intransitive) To be put into use in an apparatus.

‘The cartridge was designed to load easily.’;

Carrynoun

(computing) The bit or digit that is carried in an addition operation.

Loadverb

To read (data or a program) from a storage medium into computer memory.

‘Click OK to load the selected data.’;

Carrynoun

(finance) The benefit or cost of owning an asset over time.

‘The carry on this trade is 25 basis points per annum.’;

Loadverb

To transfer from a storage medium into computer memory.

‘This program takes an age to load.’;

Carrynoun

(golf) The distance travelled by the ball when struck, until it hits the ground.

Loadverb

To put runners on first, second and third bases

‘He walks to load the bases.’;

Carrynoun

(finance) Carried interest.

Loadverb

(transitive) To tamper with so as to produce a biased outcome.

‘You can load the dice in your favour by researching the company before your interview.’; ‘The wording of the ballot paper loaded the vote in favour of the Conservative candidate.’;

Carrynoun

The sky; cloud-drift.

Loadverb

(transitive) To ask or adapt a question so that it will be more likely to be answered in a certain way.

Carryverb

To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; - often with away or off.

‘When he dieth he shall carry nothing away.’; ‘Devout men carried Stephen to his burial.’; ‘Another carried the intelligence to Russell.’; ‘The sound will be carried, at the least, twenty miles.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To encumber with something negative, to place as an encumbrance.

‘The new owners had loaded the company with debt.’; ‘The new owners loaded debt on the company.’;

Carryverb

To have or hold as a burden, while moving from place to place; to have upon or about one's person; to bear; as, to carry a wound; to carry an unborn child.

‘If the ideas . . . were carried along with us in our minds.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To provide in abundance.

‘He loaded his system with carbs before the marathon.’; ‘He loaded carbs into his system before the marathon.’;

Carryverb

To move; to convey by force; to impel; to conduct; to lead or guide.

‘Go, carry Sir John Falstaff to the Fleet.’; ‘He carried away all his cattle.’; ‘Passion and revenge will carry them too far.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To weight (a cane, whip, etc.) with lead.

Carryverb

To transfer from one place (as a country, book, or column) to another; as, to carry the war from Greece into Asia; to carry an account to the ledger; to carry a number in adding figures.

Loadverb

To adulterate or drug.

‘to load wine’;

Carryverb

To convey by extension or continuance; to extend; as, to carry the chimney through the roof; to carry a road ten miles farther.

Loadverb

To magnetize.

Carryverb

To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, as a leader or principle; hence, to succeed in, as in a contest; to bring to a successful issue; to win; as, to carry an election.

‘The carrying of our main point.’;

Loadnoun

A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.

‘He might such a loadTo town with his ass carry.’;

Carryverb

To get possession of by force; to capture.

‘The town would have been carried in the end.’;

Loadnoun

The quantity which can be carried or drawn in some specified way; the contents of a cart, barrow, or vessel; that which will constitute a cargo; lading.

Carryverb

To contain; to comprise; to bear the aspect of ; to show or exhibit; to imply.

‘He thought it carried something of argument in it.’; ‘It carries too great an imputation of ignorance.’;

Loadnoun

That which burdens, oppresses, or grieves the mind or spirits; as, a load of care.

Carryverb

To bear (one's self); to behave, to conduct or demean; - with the reflexive pronouns.

‘He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.’;

Loadnoun

A particular measure for certain articles, being as much as may be carried at one time by the conveyance commonly used for the article measured; as, a load of wood; a load of hay; specifically, five quarters.

Carryverb

To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another; as, a merchant is carrying a large stock; a farm carries a mortgage; a broker carries stock for a customer; to carry a life insurance.

Loadnoun

The charge of a firearm; as, a load of powder.

Carryverb

To act as a bearer; to convey anything; as, to fetch and carry.

Loadnoun

Weight or violence of blows.

Carryverb

To have propulsive power; to propel; as, a gun or mortar carries well.

Loadnoun

The work done by a steam engine or other prime mover when working.

Carryverb

To hold the head; - said of a horse; as, to carry well i. e., to hold the head high, with arching neck.

Loadnoun

The amount of work that a person, group, or machine is assigned to perform; as, the boss distributed the load evenly among his employees.

Carryverb

To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.

Loadnoun

The device or devices that consume power from a power supply.

Carrynoun

A tract of land, over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a carrying place; a portage.

Loadnoun

The weight or force that a structural support bears or is designed to bear; the object that creates that force.

Carrynoun

the act of carrying something

Loadverb

To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon.

‘I strive all in vain to load the cart.’; ‘I have loaden me with many spoils.’; ‘Those honors deep and broad, wherewithYour majesty loads our house.’;

Carryverb

move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body;

‘You must carry your camping gear’; ‘carry the suitcases to the car’; ‘This train is carrying nuclear waste’; ‘These pipes carry waste water into the river’;

Loadverb

To adulterate or drug; as, to load wine.

Carryverb

have with oneself; have on one's person;

‘She always takes an umbrella’; ‘I always carry money’; ‘She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains’;

Loadverb

To magnetize.

Carryverb

transmit or serve as the medium for transmission;

‘Sound carries well over water’; ‘The airwaves carry the sound’; ‘Many metals conduct heat’;

Loadnoun

weight to be borne or conveyed

Carryverb

serve as a means for expressing something;

‘The painting of Mary carries motherly love’; ‘His voice carried a lot af anger’;

Loadnoun

a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time;

‘the system broke down under excessive loads’;

Carryverb

bear or be able to bear the weight, pressure,or responsibility of;

‘His efforts carried the entire project’; ‘How many credits is this student carrying?’; ‘We carry a very large mortgage’;

Loadnoun

goods carried by a large vehicle

Carryverb

support or hold in a certain manner;

‘She holds her head high’; ‘He carried himself upright’;

Loadnoun

an amount of alcohol sufficient to intoxicate;

‘he got a load on and started a brawl’;

Carryverb

contain or hold; have within;

‘The jar carries wine’; ‘The canteen holds fresh water’; ‘This can contains water’;

Loadnoun

the power output of a generator or power plant

Carryverb

extend to a certain degree;

‘carry too far’; ‘She carries her ideas to the extreme’;

Loadnoun

an onerous or difficult concern;

‘the burden of responsibility’; ‘that's a load off my mind’;

Carryverb

continue or extend;

‘The civil war carried into the neighboring province’; ‘The disease extended into the remote mountain provinces’;

Loadnoun

a deposit of valuable ore occurring within definite boundaries separating it from surrounding rocks

Carryverb

be necessarily associated with or result in or involve;

‘This crime carries a penalty of five years in prison’;

Loadnoun

the front part of a guided missile or rocket or torpedo that carries the nuclear or explosive charge or the chemical or biological agents

Carryverb

win in an election;

‘The senator carried his home state’;

Loadnoun

electrical device to which electrical power is delivered

Carryverb

include, as on a list;

‘How many people are carried on the payroll?’;

Loadverb

fill or place a load on;

‘load a car’; ‘load the truck with hay’;

Carryverb

behave in a certain manner;

‘She carried herself well’; ‘he bore himself with dignity’; ‘They conducted themselves well during these difficult times’;

Loadverb

provide with munition;

‘He loaded his gun carefully’;

Carryverb

have on hand;

‘Do you carry kerosene heaters?’;

Loadverb

put (something) on a structure or conveyance;

‘load the bags onto the trucks’;

Carryverb

include as the content; broadcast or publicize;

‘We ran the ad three times’; ‘This paper carries a restaurant review’; ‘All major networks carried the press conference’;

Loadnoun

a heavy or bulky thing that is being carried or is about to be carried

‘in addition to their own food, they must carry a load of up to eighty pounds’;

Carryverb

propel,

‘Carry the ball’; ‘dribble the ball’;

Loadnoun

the total number or amount that can be carried in something, typically a vehicle or container

‘a lorry-load of soldiers’;

Carryverb

pass on a communication;

‘The news was carried to every village in the province’;

Loadnoun

a quantity of items washed or to be washed in a washing machine or dishwasher at one time

‘I do at least six loads of washing a week’;

Carryverb

have as an inherent or characteristic feature or have as a consequence;

‘This new washer carries a two year guarantee’; ‘The loan carries a high interest rate’; ‘this undertaking carries many dangers’; ‘She carries her mother's genes’; ‘These bonds carry warrants’; ‘The restaurant carries an unusual name’;

Loadnoun

the material carried along by a stream, glacier, ocean current, etc.

‘the streams deposited their loads, leaving thin sheets of gravel or sand’;

Carryverb

be conveyed over a certain distance;

‘Her voice carries very well in this big opera house’;

Loadnoun

a weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something

‘the increased load on the heart caused by a raised arterial pressure’; ‘the arch has hollow spandrels to lighten the load on the foundations’;

Carryverb

keep up with financial support;

‘The Federal Government carried the province for many years’;

Loadnoun

the amount of work to be done by a person or machine

‘Arthur has a light teaching load’;

Carryverb

have or possess something abstract;

‘I carry her image in my mind's eye’; ‘I will carry the secret to my grave’; ‘I carry these thoughts in the back of my head’; ‘I carry a lot of life insurance’;

Loadnoun

a burden of responsibility, worry, or grief.

Carryverb

win approval or support for;

‘Carry all before one’; ‘His speech did not sway the voters’;

Loadnoun

a lot of

‘she was talking a load of rubbish’;

Carryverb

compensate for a weaker partner or member by one's own performance;

‘I resent having to carry her all the time’;

Loadnoun

plenty

‘there's loads to see here, even when it rains’; ‘she spends loads of money on clothes’;

Carryverb

take further or advance;

‘carry a cause’;

Loadnoun

the amount of power supplied by a source; the resistance of moving parts to be overcome by a motor

‘if the wire in the fuse is too thin to accept the load it will melt’;

Carryverb

have on the surface or on the skin;

‘carry scars’;

Loadnoun

the amount of electricity supplied by a generating system at any given time.

Carryverb

capture after a fight;

‘The troops carried the town after a brief fight’;

Loadnoun

an impedance or circuit that receives or develops the output of a transistor or other device.

Carryverb

transfer (entries) from one account book to another

Loadverb

fill (a vehicle, ship, container, etc.) with a large amount of something

‘they go to Calais to load up their vans with cheap beer’;

Carryverb

transfer (a number, cipher, or remainder) to the next column or unit's place before or after, in addition or multiplication;

‘put down 5 and carry 2’;

Loadverb

place (a load or large quantity of something) on or in a vehicle, ship, container, etc.

‘stolen property from a burglary was loaded into a taxi’;

Carryverb

pursue a line of scent or be a bearer;

‘the dog was taught to fetch and carry’;

Loadverb

(of a ship or vehicle) take on a load

‘when we came to the quay the ship was still loading’;

Carryverb

bear (a crop);

‘this land does not carry olives’;

Loadverb

take, buy, or consume a large amount of

‘I just went down to the store and loaded up on beer’;

Carryverb

propel or give impetus to;

‘The sudden gust of air propelled the ball to the other side of the fence’;

Loadverb

make (someone or something) carry or hold a large or excessive quantity of heavy things

‘Elaine was loaded down with bags full of shopping’;

Carryverb

drink alcohol without showing ill effects;

‘He can hold his liquor’; ‘he had drunk more than he could carry’;

Loadverb

supply someone or something with (something) in overwhelming abundance or to excess

‘the King and Queen loaded Columbus with wealth and honours’;

Carryverb

be able to feed;

‘This land will carry ten cows to the acre’;

Loadverb

bias towards a particular outcome

‘the odds were loaded against them before the match’;

Carryverb

have a certain range;

‘This rifle carries for 3,000 feet’;

Loadverb

charge (a firearm) with ammunition

‘he began to load the gun’;

Carryverb

cover a certain distance or advance beyond;

‘The drive carried to the green’;

Loadverb

insert something into (a device) so that it can be operated

‘load your camera before you start’; ‘following breakfast we clear the table and load the dishwasher’;

Carryverb

secure the passage or adoption (of bills and motions);

‘The motion carried easily’;

Loadverb

insert (something) into a device so that it will operate

‘load the cassette into the camcorder’;

Carryverb

be successful in;

‘She lost the game but carried the match’;

Loadverb

transfer (a program or data) into memory, or into the central processor from storage

‘when the program is loaded into the microcomputer, the CPU carries out each instruction’;

Carryverb

sing or play against other voices or parts;

‘He cannot carry a tune’;

Loadverb

add an extra charge to (an insurance premium) to take account of a factor that increases the risk.

Carryverb

be pregnant with;

‘She is bearing his child’; ‘The are expecting another child in January’; ‘I am carrying his child’;

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