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Carol vs. Wassail

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Carolnoun

(architecture) lang=en.

Wassailnoun

A toast to health, usually on a festive occasion.

Carolnoun

A round dance.

Wassailnoun

The beverage served during a wassail, especially one made of ale or wine flavoured with spices, sugar, roasted apples, etc.

Carolnoun

A song of joy, exultation, or mirth; a lay.

‘The costly feast, the carol, and the dance.’; ‘It was the carol of a bird.’;

Wassailnoun

Revelry.

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Carolnoun

A song of praise of devotion; as, a Christmas or Easter carol.

‘Heard a carol, mournful, holy.’; ‘In the darkness sing your carol of high praise.’;

Wassailnoun

A festive or drinking song or glee.

Carolnoun

Joyful music, as of a song.

‘I heard the bells on Christmans DayTheir old, familiar carol play.’;

Wassailverb

(transitive) To toast, to drink to the health of another.

‘The next morning he much regretted the gusto with which he had wassailed the night before.’;

Carolnoun

A small closet or inclosure built against a window on the inner side, to sit in for study. The word was used as late as the 16th century. The term carrel, of the same has largely superseded its use.

‘A bay window may thus be called a carol.’;

Wassailverb

(intransitive) To drink wassail.

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Carolverb

To praise or celebrate in song.

‘The Shepherds at their festivalsCarol her goodness.’;

Wassailverb

To go from house to house at Christmastime, singing carols.

Carolverb

To sing, especially with joyful notes.

‘Hovering swans . . . carol sounds harmonious.’;

Wassailnoun

An ancient expression of good wishes on a festive occasion, especially in drinking to some one.

‘Geoffrey of Monmouth relates, on the authority of Walter Calenius, that this lady [Rowena], the daughter of Hengist, knelt down on the approach of the king, and, presenting him with a cup of wine, exclaimed, Lord king wæs heil, that is, literally, Health be to you.’;

Carolverb

To sing; esp. to sing joyfully; to warble.

‘And carol of love's high praise.’; ‘The gray linnets carol from the hill.’;

Wassailnoun

An occasion on which such good wishes are expressed in drinking; a drinking bout; a carouse.

‘The king doth wake to-night and takes his rouse,Keeps wassail.’; ‘The victors abandoned themselves to feasting and wassail.’;

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Carolnoun

joyful religious song celebrating the birth of Christ

Wassailnoun

The liquor used for a wassail; esp., a beverage formerly much used in England at Christmas and other festivals, made of ale (or wine) flavored with spices, sugar, toast, roasted apples, etc.; - called also lamb's wool.

‘A jolly wassail bowl,A wassail of good ale.’;

Carolnoun

a joyful song (usually celebrating the birth of Christ)

Wassailnoun

A festive or drinking song or glee.

‘Have you done your wassail! 'T is a handsome, drowsy ditty, I'll assure you.’;

Carolverb

sing carols;

‘They went caroling on Christmas Day’;

Wassailadjective

Of or pertaining to wassail, or to a wassail; convivial; as, a wassail bowl.

Carolnoun

a religious folk song or popular hymn, particularly one associated with Christmas

‘we sang carols by candlelight’;

Wassailverb

To hold a wassail; to carouse.

‘Spending all the day, and good part of the night, in dancing, caroling, and wassailing.’;

Carolverb

sing or say (something) happily

‘‘Goodbye,’ he carolled’; ‘she was cheerfully carolling the words of the song’;

Wassailnoun

a punch made of sweetened ale or wine heated with spices and roasted apples; especially at Christmas

Carolverb

the activity of singing Christmas carols

‘a night of Christmas carolling was traditional’; ‘we carolled from door to door’;

Wassailverb

celebrate noisily, often indulging in drinking; engage in uproarious festivities;

‘The members of the wedding party made merry all night’; ‘Let's whoop it up--the boss is gone!’;

Wassailverb

propose a toast to;

‘Let us toast the birthday girl!’; ‘Let's drink to the New Year’;

Wassail

Wassail (, WOSS-əl, -⁠ayl, most likely from Old Norse ) is a beverage made from hot mulled cider and spices, drunk traditionally as an integral part of wassailing, an ancient English Yuletide drinking ritual and salutation either involved in door-to-door charity-giving or used to ensure a good cider apple harvest the following year.

‘ves heill’;

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