VS.

Capitulate vs. Concede

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Capitulateverb

(intransitive) To surrender; to end all resistance, to give up; to go along with or comply.

‘He argued and hollered for so long that I finally capitulated just to make him stop.’;

Concedeverb

To yield or suffer; to surrender; to grant

‘I have to concede the argument.’; ‘He conceded the race once it was clear he could not win.’; ‘Kendall conceded defeat once she realized she could not win in a battle of wits.’;

Capitulateverb

To draw up in chapters; to enumerate.

Concedeverb

To grant, as a right or privilege; to make concession of.

Capitulateverb

To draw up the articles of treaty with; to treat, bargain, parley.

Concedeverb

To admit to be true; to acknowledge.

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Capitulateverb

To settle or draw up the heads or terms of an agreement, as in chapters or articles; to agree.

‘There capitulates with the king . . . to take to wife his daughter Mary.’; ‘There is no reason why the reducing of any agreement to certain heads or capitula should not be called to capitulate.’;

Concedeverb

To yield or make concession.

Capitulateverb

To surrender on terms agreed upon (usually, drawn up under several heads); as, an army or a garrison capitulates.

‘The Irish, after holding out a week, capitulated.’;

Concedeverb

(sports) To have a goal or point scored against

Capitulateverb

To surrender or transfer, as an army or a fortress, on certain conditions.

Concedeverb

(cricket) (of a bowler) to have runs scored off of one's bowling.

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Capitulateverb

surrender under agreed conditions

Concedeverb

To yield or suffer; to surrender; to grant; as, to concede the point in question.

Concedeverb

To grant, as a right or privilege; to make concession of.

Concedeverb

To admit to be true; to acknowledge.

‘We concede that their citizens were those who lived under different forms.’;

Concedeverb

To yield or make concession.

‘I wished you to concede to America, at a time when she prayed concession at our feet.’;

Concedeverb

admit, make a clean breast of;

‘She confessed that she had taken the money’;

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Concedeverb

be willing to concede;

‘I grant you this much’;

Concedeverb

give over; surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another

Concedeverb

acknowledge defeat;

‘The candidate conceded after enough votes had come in to show that he would lose’;

Concedeverb

admit or agree that something is true after first denying or resisting it

‘I had to concede that I'd overreacted’; ‘‘All right then,’ she conceded’;

Concedeverb

admit (defeat) in a match or contest

‘reluctantly, Ellen conceded defeat’;

Concedeverb

admit defeat in (a match or contest)

‘they conceded the match to their opponents’;

Concedeverb

surrender or yield (a possession, right, or privilege)

‘in 475 the emperor conceded the Auvergne to Euric’;

Concedeverb

grant (a right, privilege, or demand)

‘their rights to redress of grievances were conceded once more’;

Concedeverb

(in sport) fail to prevent an opponent scoring (a goal or point)

‘they have conceded only one goal in seven matches’;

Concedeverb

allow (a lead or advantage) to slip

‘he took an early lead which he never conceded’;

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